American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

New Hampshire

Senate

Judd Gregg

  • Frank Barca
  • Kevin Bargo
  • Jacqueline Cooney
  • David Fisher
  • Jennifer French
  • Scott Gudes
  • Steven Irizarry
  • Kevin Koonce
  • Tracy Locklin
  • Joel Maiula
  • John Mashburn
  • Gary Matzke
  • Denzel Mcguire
  • Townsend Mcnitt
  • Kim Monk
  • Stephanie Monroe
  • Luke Nachbar
  • David Thompson
  • Vince Ventimiglia
  • Richard Weiblinger
  • Anne White
  • Frank Zhang

    Robert Smith

  • Kenneth Adler
  • Sharla Beall
  • Dave Canover
  • Dave Conover
  • Dan Corbett
  • Melinda Cross
  • Stephanie Daigle
  • John Denning
  • Patricia Doerr
  • Genevieve Erny
  • Thomas Gibson
  • Martin Hall
  • Chelsea Henderson
  • Chris Hessler
  • Paul Jensen
  • Jennifer Johnson
  • Ann Klee
  • M Kirstin Kohrer
  • John Lang
  • Edward Michaels
  • John Pemberton
  • John Pombri
  • Kirstin Rohrer
  • Jeffrey Rose
  • Alex Shively
  • Megan Stanley
  • Ellen Stein
  • Russell Thomasson
  • David Tille
  • House

    Charles Bass

  • John Billings
  • Darwin Cusack
  • Francis Furtado
  • Tad Furtado
  • Neil Levesque
  • Alissa Southworth
  • Jennifer Warren
  • Virginia Wilbert
  • Virginia Witbert

    Jeb Bradley

    John Sununu

  • James Burnett
  • David Cuzzi
  • Pamela Kocher
  • Christiana Laventure
  • Michael O'rielly
  • John Richardson
  • Barbara Riley


  • American RadioWorks |
    teaching-teachers

    Teaching Teachers

    Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

    Recent Posts

    • 08.27.15

      An American way of teaching

      In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
    • 08.27.15

      Rethinking teacher preparation

      In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
    • 08.27.15

      A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

      In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
    • 08.27.15

      Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

      "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball