American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

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Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Nebraska

Senate

Chuck Hagel

  • Melissa Allen
  • Dorothy Anderson
  • Dan Archer
  • A Kent Banhan
  • Michael Buttry
  • Terry Campbell
  • Abigail Clark
  • Michael Considine
  • Michael Coulter
  • Joe Cwiklinski
  • Josh Denney
  • Joy Ditto
  • Deb Fiddelke
  • Keith Hand
  • Steven Irizarry
  • Thomas Janssen
  • Jamie Karl
  • Jill Konz
  • Jill Kosch
  • Joseph Lai
  • Lou Ann Linehan
  • Theresa Mcniel
  • Nathan Mick
  • Lyndsy Mlady
  • Amy Muhlberg
  • Dale Nellor
  • Henry Nickel
  • James Nygren
  • Andrew Parasiliti
  • Kenneth Peel
  • William Protexter
  • Cory Taylor
  • Brian Thomas
  • Heather West
  • Chad Wolf
  • Randel Zeller

    J. Robert Kerrey

    Ben Nelson

  • Jason Briggs
  • David Culver
  • David Dimartino
  • Ben Hansen
  • Eric Pierce
  • Amy Tejral
  • James Vavricek
  • Kim Zimmerman
  • House

    Bill Barrett

    Doug Bereuter

  • Jodi Detwiler
  • Alan Feyerherm
  • Kyle Gilster
  • Carol Lawrence
  • Laura Marks
  • Alicia O'donnell
  • Susan Olson
  • Jon Peterson
  • Jodi Smith
  • Michelle Spence

    Jeff Fortenberry

  • Benjamin Sasse

    Tom Osborne

  • Erin Duncan

    Lee Terry

  • Mark Anderson
  • Daniel Arlhetz
  • Caroline Baird
  • Dana Hanson
  • D Eric Hultman
  • Jamie Karl
  • Perry Pirsch
  • Dawn Sears
  • Jeffrey Shapiro
  • Robert Stien


  • American RadioWorks |
    Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

    Can how you move change how you think?

    Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

    Recent Posts

    • 05.12.15

      Forest Schools

      What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
    • 05.06.15

      Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

      There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
    • 04.29.15

      Green Teachers

      A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
    • 04.22.15

      The First Gen Movement

      Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.