American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.

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Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Nebraska

Senate

Chuck Hagel

  • Melissa Allen
  • Dorothy Anderson
  • Dan Archer
  • A Kent Banhan
  • Michael Buttry
  • Terry Campbell
  • Abigail Clark
  • Michael Considine
  • Michael Coulter
  • Joe Cwiklinski
  • Josh Denney
  • Joy Ditto
  • Deb Fiddelke
  • Keith Hand
  • Steven Irizarry
  • Thomas Janssen
  • Jamie Karl
  • Jill Konz
  • Jill Kosch
  • Joseph Lai
  • Lou Ann Linehan
  • Theresa Mcniel
  • Nathan Mick
  • Lyndsy Mlady
  • Amy Muhlberg
  • Dale Nellor
  • Henry Nickel
  • James Nygren
  • Andrew Parasiliti
  • Kenneth Peel
  • William Protexter
  • Cory Taylor
  • Brian Thomas
  • Heather West
  • Chad Wolf
  • Randel Zeller

    J. Robert Kerrey

    Ben Nelson

  • Jason Briggs
  • David Culver
  • David Dimartino
  • Ben Hansen
  • Eric Pierce
  • Amy Tejral
  • James Vavricek
  • Kim Zimmerman
  • House

    Bill Barrett

    Doug Bereuter

  • Jodi Detwiler
  • Alan Feyerherm
  • Kyle Gilster
  • Carol Lawrence
  • Laura Marks
  • Alicia O'donnell
  • Susan Olson
  • Jon Peterson
  • Jodi Smith
  • Michelle Spence

    Jeff Fortenberry

  • Benjamin Sasse

    Tom Osborne

  • Erin Duncan

    Lee Terry

  • Mark Anderson
  • Daniel Arlhetz
  • Caroline Baird
  • Dana Hanson
  • D Eric Hultman
  • Jamie Karl
  • Perry Pirsch
  • Dawn Sears
  • Jeffrey Shapiro
  • Robert Stien


  • American RadioWorks |
    (Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

    The First Family of Radio

    When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

    Recent Posts

    • 11.17.14

      The Utility of a PhD

      Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
    • 11.10.14

      Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

      President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
    • 11.12.14

      The Roosevelts as a political team

      Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
    • 11.10.14

      Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

      Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.