American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

North Dakota

Senate

Kent Conrad

  • Stephen Bailey
  • Mary Jennifer Cantrell
  • Rock Cheung
  • Neleen Eisinger
  • Jim Esquea
  • Robert Foust
  • Timothy Galvin
  • Lindsey Henjum
  • Aaron Hunter
  • Kirk Johnson
  • James Klumpner
  • Sarah Kuehl
  • Lisa Linnell
  • Thomas Mahr
  • Sean Neany
  • Sue Nelson
  • Anissa Rogness
  • Kelsey Rood
  • Wallace Rustad
  • Chris Thorne
  • Zabyn Towner
  • Bob Van Heuvelen

    Byron Dorgan

  • Gabriel Adler
  • Jeremy Bratt
  • Jose Cerda
  • Mike Eggl
  • Ladeene Freimuth
  • Maynard Friesz
  • Niles Godes
  • Elizabeth Gore
  • Brian Griffin
  • Brian Griffith
  • Pam Gulleson
  • F Jerome Hinkle
  • Curtis Jabs
  • Nicole Kroetsch
  • Jim Messina
  • Stephanie Mohl
  • Brian Moran
  • Emmett O'keefe
  • Emmett Okeefe
  • Daphna Peled
  • David Roll
  • Lindsey Runge
  • Toby Short
  • Dale Thoranson
  • Bob Valeu
  • G Franklin Walker
  • Lori Way
  • Dan Wogsland
  • Ian Woodward
  • House

    Earl Pomeroy

  • Alane Allman-Dent
  • Aleta Botts
  • Karen Frederickson
  • Joel Fremstad
  • H Clare Jenkins
  • Heather Miller
  • Diane Oakley
  • Carissa Page
  • Melanie Rhinehart
  • A J Wojciak


  • American RadioWorks |
    teaching-teachers

    Teaching Teachers

    Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

    Recent Posts

    • 08.27.15

      An American way of teaching

      In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
    • 08.27.15

      Rethinking teacher preparation

      In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
    • 08.27.15

      A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

      In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
    • 08.27.15

      Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

      "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball