American RadioWorks |
Image: Sweet Briar College web site

Sweet Briar Returns

Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.

Recent Posts

  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.
  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Sweet Briar College web site

Sweet Briar Returns

Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.

Recent Posts

  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.
  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

North Dakota

Senate

Kent Conrad

  • Stephen Bailey
  • Mary Jennifer Cantrell
  • Rock Cheung
  • Neleen Eisinger
  • Jim Esquea
  • Robert Foust
  • Timothy Galvin
  • Lindsey Henjum
  • Aaron Hunter
  • Kirk Johnson
  • James Klumpner
  • Sarah Kuehl
  • Lisa Linnell
  • Thomas Mahr
  • Sean Neany
  • Sue Nelson
  • Anissa Rogness
  • Kelsey Rood
  • Wallace Rustad
  • Chris Thorne
  • Zabyn Towner
  • Bob Van Heuvelen

    Byron Dorgan

  • Gabriel Adler
  • Jeremy Bratt
  • Jose Cerda
  • Mike Eggl
  • Ladeene Freimuth
  • Maynard Friesz
  • Niles Godes
  • Elizabeth Gore
  • Brian Griffin
  • Brian Griffith
  • Pam Gulleson
  • F Jerome Hinkle
  • Curtis Jabs
  • Nicole Kroetsch
  • Jim Messina
  • Stephanie Mohl
  • Brian Moran
  • Emmett O'keefe
  • Emmett Okeefe
  • Daphna Peled
  • David Roll
  • Lindsey Runge
  • Toby Short
  • Dale Thoranson
  • Bob Valeu
  • G Franklin Walker
  • Lori Way
  • Dan Wogsland
  • Ian Woodward
  • House

    Earl Pomeroy

  • Alane Allman-Dent
  • Aleta Botts
  • Karen Frederickson
  • Joel Fremstad
  • H Clare Jenkins
  • Heather Miller
  • Diane Oakley
  • Carissa Page
  • Melanie Rhinehart
  • A J Wojciak


  • American RadioWorks |
    Image: Sweet Briar College web site

    Sweet Briar Returns

    Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.

    Recent Posts

    • 07.15.15

      The Future of Historically Black Colleges

      Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
    • 07.07.15

      Talking About Race in Schools

      Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
    • 07.02.15

      Minorities and Special Ed

      For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.
    • 06.23.15

      Learning from Video Games

      A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.