American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

North Carolina

Senate

Elizabeth Dole

  • Alfred Garesche
  • Gregory Gross
  • Frank Hill
  • Scott Quesenberry
  • Danielle Turnipseed

    John Edwards

  • Victoria Basseth
  • Crystal Bennett
  • Michael Briggs
  • Erica Buehrens
  • Derek Chollet
  • Laura Godwin
  • Kate Heath
  • Stephanie Jones
  • Miles Lackey
  • Jeffrey Lane
  • Maureen Mahon
  • Kathryn Marks
  • Kevin Monroe

    Jesse Helms

  • Sara Elizabeth Battaglia
  • Chess Bedsole
  • Wayne Boyles
  • James Broughton
  • Brian Fox
  • Adam Frey
  • Philip Griffin
  • George Holding
  • Mark Lagon
  • Matt Leggert
  • Matthew Leggett
  • Walter Lohman
  • Kristen Madison
  • Patricia Mcnerney
  • Brian Meyers
  • Roger Noriega
  • Kelly O'neal
  • Maurice Perkins
  • Mary Lynn Qurnell
  • David Rouzer
  • Jedidiah Royal
  • Natasha Watson
  • David Whitney
  • Susan Williams
  • House

    Frank Ballance

  • Dana Hopings

    Cass Ballenger

  • Dan Gurley
  • Roberta Hood
  • Rebecca Linder
  • Timothy Linko
  • Ben Moser
  • Roberta Myers
  • Heath Weems

    Richard Burr

  • Alicia Clark
  • Jennifer Hansen
  • Peter Hars
  • Amelia Meli
  • Kimrey Rhinehardt
  • Brian Vanderbloemen
  • John Versaggi

    G.K. Butterfield

  • Adria Crutchfield
  • Robert Harris
  • Saul Hernandez

    Eva Clayton

  • Johnny Barnes
  • Dollie Burwell
  • Corliss Clemonts-James
  • Darryl Smith

    Howard Coble

  • Sarah Birch
  • Robbie Boone
  • Missy Branson
  • Amanda Hamilton
  • Chris Katopis
  • Nancy Mazza
  • Ed Mcdonald
  • Blaine Merritt
  • Andrew Moretl
  • Anna Sagely
  • Jane Scott

    Bob Etheridge

  • Julie Dwyer
  • Jennifer Eberhardt
  • Margaret Fisher
  • Patricia Lawler
  • Christopher Ogilvie
  • Lindy Paull
  • Ida Pleasants
  • Carolyn Smith

    Virginia Foxx

  • Deana Funderburk
  • Robert Honold
  • Richard Hudson

    Robin Hayes

  • Jon Causey
  • Andrew Duke
  • Neil Mahoney
  • Andy Munn
  • Timothy Peters
  • Thomas Sevier
  • Jennifer Thompson
  • Jana Weir

    Walter Jones

  • Michael Araman
  • Joshua Bowlen
  • Geoff Bowman
  • Glen Downs
  • John Weaver
  • Katie Woodruff
  • Whitley Worthington

    Patrick Mchenry

  • Douglas Stewart

    Mike Mcintyre

  • Caroline Barbee
  • Jeff Hogg
  • Audrey Lesesne
  • Martha Ann Mclean
  • Blair Milligan

    Brad Miller

  • Thomas Koonce
  • Bryan Mitchell

    Sue Myrick

  • Lisa Bos
  • Neil Bradley
  • Stephen Flippin
  • Elizabeth Hoy
  • Bradley Jones
  • Jayda Justus
  • Sheila Moloney
  • Richard Priest
  • Becci Roberts
  • David Spoonet
  • Paul Teller
  • Lisa Waltzman

    David Price

  • Doug Bend
  • Susan Carr
  • Susan Gossman
  • Asher Hildebrand
  • Susan Howard
  • Jodi Keyserling
  • Elizabeth Kirhland
  • Elizabeth Kirkland
  • Susan Mers
  • Eric Safp

    Charles Taylor

  • Sean Dalton
  • Roger France
  • Rex Shepherd

    Mel Watt

  • Andrew Barwig
  • Andrew Berwig
  • Paul Brathwaite
  • Joyce Brayboy
  • Keven Brough
  • Laura Hooper
  • Jewel James
  • Erika Jeffers
  • William Johnson
  • Jesse Price
  • Christal Sheppard


  • American RadioWorks |
    (Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

    The First Family of Radio

    When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

    Recent Posts

    • 12.16.14

      Rising prices on the poorest

      In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
    • 12.08.14

      How Much Will College Cost My Family?

      In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
    • 12.01.14

      Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

      There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
    • 12.01.14

      Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

      I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.