American RadioWorks |
Image: Sweet Briar College web site

Sweet Briar Returns

Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.

Recent Posts

  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.
  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Sweet Briar College web site

Sweet Briar Returns

Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.

Recent Posts

  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.
  • 06.23.15

    Learning from Video Games

    A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Mississippi

Senate

Thad Cochran

  • Rebecca Benn
  • Emily Brunini
  • Ann Copland
  • Patricia Doty
  • Win Ellington
  • Harvey Fisher
  • Warren Harper
  • Thomas Hawks
  • Clayton Heil
  • Stephen Higginbothom
  • Stewart Holmes
  • David Johnson
  • Rachelle Johnson
  • Mark Keenum
  • Lance Kotschwar
  • Josh Manley
  • William Mcclendon
  • Andrew Morton
  • Kimberly Nelson
  • Matthew O'mara
  • Nancy Olkewicz
  • Molly Phillips
  • Martha Poindexter
  • Brad Prewitt
  • Jenny Reeves
  • Rachelle Schroeder
  • Thomas Shipman
  • Les Spivey
  • Eric Steiner
  • Dawn Stump
  • Doug Sullivan
  • Marvin Sullivan
  • Marie Thomas
  • James Thompson
  • Doris Wagley
  • Virginia Wallace
  • Tyler Wegmeyer
  • Margaret Wicker
  • Andrew Willison

    Trent Lott

  • Renee Bennett
  • Steve Browning
  • Angel Campbell
  • Jennifer Casademont
  • Brandon Cobianchi
  • Thomas Elwjin
  • William Gottshall
  • Virginia Gregory
  • Dave Hoppe
  • Susan Irby
  • Rohit Kumar
  • Hardy Lott
  • John Mashburn
  • Jack Norris
  • Laura O'neill
  • Carol Ross
  • Elizabeth Ross
  • Emanuel Rossman
  • James Sartucci
  • Beth Spivey
  • Mitch Waldman
  • Steven Wall
  • Susan Wells
  • Clay Williams
  • Brian Wilson
  • Eric Womble
  • House

    Charles Pickering

  • Susan Butler
  • Michael Chappell
  • David Hurst
  • Cade King
  • Michael Lipski
  • John Rounsaville

    Ronnie Shows

  • Kacey Guy

    Gene Taylor

  • Stephen Peranich
  • Wayne Weider
  • Wayne Weidie

    Bennie Thompson

  • I Lanier Avant
  • Carla Buckner
  • Christopher Espy
  • Steve Gavin
  • Todd Gee
  • Constance Olivia Harvey
  • Jessica Herrera
  • Calvin Humphrey
  • Minnie Langham
  • Marsha Mccraven
  • Sue Ramanathan
  • Walter Vinson
  • Timla Washington

    Roger Wicker

  • Bradley Ayers
  • Michelle Barlow
  • Jennifer Biggy
  • Kim Chamberlin
  • John Keast
  • Aubert Kimbrell
  • James Perry
  • Lemuel Smith
  • Susan Sweat
  • Erskine Wells


  • American RadioWorks |
    Image: Sweet Briar College web site

    Sweet Briar Returns

    Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.

    Recent Posts

    • 07.15.15

      The Future of Historically Black Colleges

      Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
    • 07.07.15

      Talking About Race in Schools

      Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
    • 07.02.15

      Minorities and Special Ed

      For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.
    • 06.23.15

      Learning from Video Games

      A lot of parents worry about whether their kids' video game habits are harmful - especially when gaming gets in the way of homework or reading. But writer Greg Toppo says gaming can be a great way to learn.