American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.24.14

    Academic Fraud and College Athletics

    Last month the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill released a report that showed evidence of nearly two decades of academic fraud perpetuated by the school’s Afro-American Studies Department. An investigation found certain professors and administrators had an unwritten policy of “propping up” student athletes. This week on the podcast, we look at academic fraud at colleges with high-stakes sports programs.
  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.24.14

    Academic Fraud and College Athletics

    Last month the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill released a report that showed evidence of nearly two decades of academic fraud perpetuated by the school’s Afro-American Studies Department. An investigation found certain professors and administrators had an unwritten policy of “propping up” student athletes. This week on the podcast, we look at academic fraud at colleges with high-stakes sports programs.
  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Mississippi

Senate

Thad Cochran

  • Rebecca Benn
  • Emily Brunini
  • Ann Copland
  • Patricia Doty
  • Win Ellington
  • Harvey Fisher
  • Warren Harper
  • Thomas Hawks
  • Clayton Heil
  • Stephen Higginbothom
  • Stewart Holmes
  • David Johnson
  • Rachelle Johnson
  • Mark Keenum
  • Lance Kotschwar
  • Josh Manley
  • William Mcclendon
  • Andrew Morton
  • Kimberly Nelson
  • Matthew O'mara
  • Nancy Olkewicz
  • Molly Phillips
  • Martha Poindexter
  • Brad Prewitt
  • Jenny Reeves
  • Rachelle Schroeder
  • Thomas Shipman
  • Les Spivey
  • Eric Steiner
  • Dawn Stump
  • Doug Sullivan
  • Marvin Sullivan
  • Marie Thomas
  • James Thompson
  • Doris Wagley
  • Virginia Wallace
  • Tyler Wegmeyer
  • Margaret Wicker
  • Andrew Willison

    Trent Lott

  • Renee Bennett
  • Steve Browning
  • Angel Campbell
  • Jennifer Casademont
  • Brandon Cobianchi
  • Thomas Elwjin
  • William Gottshall
  • Virginia Gregory
  • Dave Hoppe
  • Susan Irby
  • Rohit Kumar
  • Hardy Lott
  • John Mashburn
  • Jack Norris
  • Laura O'neill
  • Carol Ross
  • Elizabeth Ross
  • Emanuel Rossman
  • James Sartucci
  • Beth Spivey
  • Mitch Waldman
  • Steven Wall
  • Susan Wells
  • Clay Williams
  • Brian Wilson
  • Eric Womble
  • House

    Charles Pickering

  • Susan Butler
  • Michael Chappell
  • David Hurst
  • Cade King
  • Michael Lipski
  • John Rounsaville

    Ronnie Shows

  • Kacey Guy

    Gene Taylor

  • Stephen Peranich
  • Wayne Weider
  • Wayne Weidie

    Bennie Thompson

  • I Lanier Avant
  • Carla Buckner
  • Christopher Espy
  • Steve Gavin
  • Todd Gee
  • Constance Olivia Harvey
  • Jessica Herrera
  • Calvin Humphrey
  • Minnie Langham
  • Marsha Mccraven
  • Sue Ramanathan
  • Walter Vinson
  • Timla Washington

    Roger Wicker

  • Bradley Ayers
  • Michelle Barlow
  • Jennifer Biggy
  • Kim Chamberlin
  • John Keast
  • Aubert Kimbrell
  • James Perry
  • Lemuel Smith
  • Susan Sweat
  • Erskine Wells


  • American RadioWorks |
    (Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

    The First Family of Radio

    When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

    Recent Posts

    • 11.24.14

      Academic Fraud and College Athletics

      Last month the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill released a report that showed evidence of nearly two decades of academic fraud perpetuated by the school’s Afro-American Studies Department. An investigation found certain professors and administrators had an unwritten policy of “propping up” student athletes. This week on the podcast, we look at academic fraud at colleges with high-stakes sports programs.
    • 11.17.14

      The Utility of a PhD

      Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
    • 11.10.14

      Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

      President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
    • 11.12.14

      The Roosevelts as a political team

      Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.