American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Mississippi

Senate

Thad Cochran

  • Rebecca Benn
  • Emily Brunini
  • Ann Copland
  • Patricia Doty
  • Win Ellington
  • Harvey Fisher
  • Warren Harper
  • Thomas Hawks
  • Clayton Heil
  • Stephen Higginbothom
  • Stewart Holmes
  • David Johnson
  • Rachelle Johnson
  • Mark Keenum
  • Lance Kotschwar
  • Josh Manley
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  • Andrew Morton
  • Kimberly Nelson
  • Matthew O'mara
  • Nancy Olkewicz
  • Molly Phillips
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  • Brad Prewitt
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  • Rachelle Schroeder
  • Thomas Shipman
  • Les Spivey
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  • Dawn Stump
  • Doug Sullivan
  • Marvin Sullivan
  • Marie Thomas
  • James Thompson
  • Doris Wagley
  • Virginia Wallace
  • Tyler Wegmeyer
  • Margaret Wicker
  • Andrew Willison

    Trent Lott

  • Renee Bennett
  • Steve Browning
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  • Jennifer Casademont
  • Brandon Cobianchi
  • Thomas Elwjin
  • William Gottshall
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  • Dave Hoppe
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  • Hardy Lott
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  • Jack Norris
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  • Carol Ross
  • Elizabeth Ross
  • Emanuel Rossman
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  • Beth Spivey
  • Mitch Waldman
  • Steven Wall
  • Susan Wells
  • Clay Williams
  • Brian Wilson
  • Eric Womble
  • House

    Charles Pickering

  • Susan Butler
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  • Cade King
  • Michael Lipski
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    Ronnie Shows

  • Kacey Guy

    Gene Taylor

  • Stephen Peranich
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    Bennie Thompson

  • I Lanier Avant
  • Carla Buckner
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  • Constance Olivia Harvey
  • Jessica Herrera
  • Calvin Humphrey
  • Minnie Langham
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  • Walter Vinson
  • Timla Washington

    Roger Wicker

  • Bradley Ayers
  • Michelle Barlow
  • Jennifer Biggy
  • Kim Chamberlin
  • John Keast
  • Aubert Kimbrell
  • James Perry
  • Lemuel Smith
  • Susan Sweat
  • Erskine Wells


  • American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
    science-smart

    The Science of Smart

    Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

    Recent Posts

    • 08.20.14

      Variation is key to deeper learning

      Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
    • 08.19.14

      Learning to love tests

      If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
    • 08.19.14

      Paul Tough on how children succeed

      Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
    • 08.18.14

      This is your brain on language

      For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.