American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

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Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Minnesota

Senate

Dean Barkley

Norm Coleman

  • Ben Anderson
  • Deborah Anderson
  • David Bowell
  • Patrick Connolly
  • Alan Elias
  • Steven Groves
  • John Halverson
  • Jeff Harrison
  • Lauri Hettinger
  • Jayne Jones
  • Lucia Lebens
  • Michelle Mackey
  • Tom Mason
  • Susan Mcdonald
  • Erich Mische
  • Andrew Siracuse
  • Jim Smith
  • Michelle Spence
  • Phillip Thomas
  • Lorianne Woodrow

    Mark Dayton

  • Sarah Dahlin
  • Erin Mcguire
  • Anne Olson

    Rod Grams

    Paul David Wellstone

  • Mark Anderson
  • John Gilman
  • Rachel Gragg
  • Perry Lange
  • Colin Mcginnis
  • Richard Mckeon
  • House

    Gil Gutknecht

  • Douglas Altrichter
  • Bryan Anderson
  • James Beabout
  • Stephanie Brand
  • Sam Diehl
  • Eric Keber
  • Amanda Krueger
  • Richard Larson
  • Brandon Lerch
  • Ryan Mclaughlin
  • Malachi Mcneilus
  • Brent Orrell
  • Julie Philp
  • Verna Regier
  • Lee Van Wychen
  • Charles Willett

    Mark Kennedy

  • Glynda Becker
  • Emily Jungwirth
  • Mark Matuska
  • Deborah Steiskal

    John Kline

  • Jean Hinz
  • Monica Jirik
  • Steven Sutton

    Bill Luther

  • Robert Decheine
  • Christina Field
  • Christian Fjeld
  • Steven Heuer
  • Katherine Kaufer
  • Amanda Pezalla

    Betty Mccollum

  • John Donald Burton
  • Bill Harper
  • Dany Khy
  • Anna Koeckeritz
  • Emily Lawrence
  • Chad Lord
  • Brittny Mccarthy
  • Jonathan Moore
  • Nora Smith
  • Constance Warhol

    David Minge

  • Randy Maluchnik
  • Aaron Peterson
  • Curtis Yoakum

    James Oberstar

  • Trinita Brown
  • Art Chan
  • Jack Danielson
  • Michael Freiberg
  • Charles Gardiner
  • Melody Hamoud
  • Kipp Johnson
  • Mary Kerr
  • Frances Mulvey
  • Aaron Peterson

    Collin Peterson

  • Steven Bekkerus
  • Christine Birdsong
  • William Black
  • Chip Conley
  • Nona Darrell
  • April Demert
  • Robin Gioracke
  • Robin Goracke
  • Earnest Goule
  • Chris Iacaruso
  • Tony Jackson
  • Martha Josephson
  • Robert Larew
  • Andrew Martin
  • Russell Middleton
  • Christopher Ogilvie
  • John Riley
  • Anne Simmons
  • Katherine Telleen

    Jim Ramstad

  • Darren Bearson
  • Dan Elling
  • David Fisher
  • Karin Hope
  • Megan Ivory
  • Michelle Mackey
  • Andrew Mckechnie
  • Valerie Nelson
  • Adam Peterman
  • Dean Peterson
  • Yelena Voynberg

    Martin Olav Sabo

  • Marjorie Duske
  • Robyn Hiestand
  • Allison Skowronski
  • Travis Talvitie
  • Lisa Tomlinson
  • Sharon Wagener

    Bruce Vento

  • Kirsten Johnson-Obey
  • Scott Shrum
  • Gia Vitali


  • American RadioWorks |
    Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

    Can how you move change how you think?

    Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

    Recent Posts

    • 05.12.15

      Forest Schools

      What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
    • 05.06.15

      Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

      There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
    • 04.29.15

      Green Teachers

      A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
    • 04.22.15

      The First Gen Movement

      Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.