American RadioWorks |
living-legacy

The Living Legacy

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.15

    The history of HBCUs in America

    Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
  • 08.20.15

    Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

    Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
  • 08.20.15

    Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

    Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
  • 08.20.15

    The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

    Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?

American RadioWorks |
living-legacy

The Living Legacy

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.15

    The history of HBCUs in America

    Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
  • 08.20.15

    Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

    Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
  • 08.20.15

    Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

    Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
  • 08.20.15

    The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

    Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?

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Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Minnesota

Senate

Dean Barkley

Norm Coleman

  • Ben Anderson
  • Deborah Anderson
  • David Bowell
  • Patrick Connolly
  • Alan Elias
  • Steven Groves
  • John Halverson
  • Jeff Harrison
  • Lauri Hettinger
  • Jayne Jones
  • Lucia Lebens
  • Michelle Mackey
  • Tom Mason
  • Susan Mcdonald
  • Erich Mische
  • Andrew Siracuse
  • Jim Smith
  • Michelle Spence
  • Phillip Thomas
  • Lorianne Woodrow

    Mark Dayton

  • Sarah Dahlin
  • Erin Mcguire
  • Anne Olson

    Rod Grams

    Paul David Wellstone

  • Mark Anderson
  • John Gilman
  • Rachel Gragg
  • Perry Lange
  • Colin Mcginnis
  • Richard Mckeon
  • House

    Gil Gutknecht

  • Douglas Altrichter
  • Bryan Anderson
  • James Beabout
  • Stephanie Brand
  • Sam Diehl
  • Eric Keber
  • Amanda Krueger
  • Richard Larson
  • Brandon Lerch
  • Ryan Mclaughlin
  • Malachi Mcneilus
  • Brent Orrell
  • Julie Philp
  • Verna Regier
  • Lee Van Wychen
  • Charles Willett

    Mark Kennedy

  • Glynda Becker
  • Emily Jungwirth
  • Mark Matuska
  • Deborah Steiskal

    John Kline

  • Jean Hinz
  • Monica Jirik
  • Steven Sutton

    Bill Luther

  • Robert Decheine
  • Christina Field
  • Christian Fjeld
  • Steven Heuer
  • Katherine Kaufer
  • Amanda Pezalla

    Betty Mccollum

  • John Donald Burton
  • Bill Harper
  • Dany Khy
  • Anna Koeckeritz
  • Emily Lawrence
  • Chad Lord
  • Brittny Mccarthy
  • Jonathan Moore
  • Nora Smith
  • Constance Warhol

    David Minge

  • Randy Maluchnik
  • Aaron Peterson
  • Curtis Yoakum

    James Oberstar

  • Trinita Brown
  • Art Chan
  • Jack Danielson
  • Michael Freiberg
  • Charles Gardiner
  • Melody Hamoud
  • Kipp Johnson
  • Mary Kerr
  • Frances Mulvey
  • Aaron Peterson

    Collin Peterson

  • Steven Bekkerus
  • Christine Birdsong
  • William Black
  • Chip Conley
  • Nona Darrell
  • April Demert
  • Robin Gioracke
  • Robin Goracke
  • Earnest Goule
  • Chris Iacaruso
  • Tony Jackson
  • Martha Josephson
  • Robert Larew
  • Andrew Martin
  • Russell Middleton
  • Christopher Ogilvie
  • John Riley
  • Anne Simmons
  • Katherine Telleen

    Jim Ramstad

  • Darren Bearson
  • Dan Elling
  • David Fisher
  • Karin Hope
  • Megan Ivory
  • Michelle Mackey
  • Andrew Mckechnie
  • Valerie Nelson
  • Adam Peterman
  • Dean Peterson
  • Yelena Voynberg

    Martin Olav Sabo

  • Marjorie Duske
  • Robyn Hiestand
  • Allison Skowronski
  • Travis Talvitie
  • Lisa Tomlinson
  • Sharon Wagener

    Bruce Vento

  • Kirsten Johnson-Obey
  • Scott Shrum
  • Gia Vitali


  • American RadioWorks |
    living-legacy

    The Living Legacy

    Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

    Recent Posts

    • 08.20.15

      The history of HBCUs in America

      Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
    • 08.20.15

      Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

      Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
    • 08.20.15

      Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

      Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
    • 08.20.15

      The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

      Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?