American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Massachusetts

Senate

Edward Kennedy

  • David Bowen
  • Stephanie Cotte
  • David Dorsey
  • Amelia Dungan
  • Dora Hughes
  • Kathleen Kruse
  • Christopher Loftis
  • Kara Marchione
  • David Nexon
  • Jane Oates
  • Esther Olavarria
  • David Oliveria
  • Danica Petroshius
  • Ngozi Pole
  • Elizabeth Prescott
  • Kevin Richards
  • Roberto Rodriguez
  • Stacey Sachs
  • John Samuelian
  • David Sutphen
  • Marty Walsh
  • Sharon Waxman
  • Portia Wu

    John Kerry

  • George Abar
  • Kelly Bovio
  • John Dasilva
  • Gregory Dean
  • Jere Glover
  • Jeff Hamond
  • Celes Hughes
  • James Hunter
  • James Jones
  • Barry Lasala
  • Matthew Martin
  • Ryan Mccormick
  • David Mckean
  • Jonathan Miller
  • John Phillips
  • Nelson Reyneri
  • Lisa Rosenberg
  • Gregg Rothschild
  • Kevin Wheeler
  • James Wise
  • House

    Michael Capuano

  • Kate Auspitz
  • Bret Freedman
  • Lucy Heenan
  • Chris Huckleberry
  • Michelle Mancini
  • Kaitlin Mccolgan
  • Daniel Muroff
  • Jon Skarin
  • Jose Vaquerano

    William Delahunt

  • Mark Agrast
  • Julie Carr
  • Cliff Etammerman
  • Michele Jalbert
  • Christine Leonard
  • Steven Schwadron
  • Cliff Stammerman

    Barney Frank

  • Todd Cranford
  • Ricardo Delfin
  • Bob Foster
  • Bruno Freitas
  • Sandra Gibbs
  • Erika Jeffers
  • Jaime Lizarraga
  • Daniel Mcglinchey
  • Scott Morris
  • Roger Olson
  • Jeff Riky
  • Jeanne Roslanowick
  • Lawranne Stewart
  • Kenneth Swab

    Stephen Lynch

  • Kerry Lawrence
  • Kerry Mcginn
  • Caroline Powers
  • Robert Ryan
  • Alexandra Toma

    Edward Markey

  • Colin Crowell
  • Joseph Dalton
  • Jeffrey Duncan
  • Michal Freedhoff
  • Michal Freedhorr
  • David Moulton
  • Angelique Skoulas
  • Ana Unruh

    James Mcgovern

  • Edward Augustus
  • Cindy Buhl
  • Daniel Holt
  • Michael Meishon
  • Michael Mershon
  • Gladys Parker
  • Christopher Philbin
  • Keith Stern
  • Ryan Thrasher

    Marty Meehan

  • Suzanne Dumont
  • Amy Ford
  • Lori Loureiro
  • Joshua Lynn

    Joe Moakley

  • George Crawford
  • Stephen Larose

    Richard Neal

  • Daniel Houton
  • Ann Jablon
  • Bridgette Johnson
  • Ryan Kelly
  • Margaret Mcglinch
  • Melissa Mueller
  • Michael Prucker

    John Olver

  • Blair Anderson
  • Suzanne Dumont
  • Robert Gatehouse
  • Peter Irvine
  • Abbie Meador
  • Tricia Pistone
  • Meghan Riley
  • Ann Russo
  • Kristin Wood

    John Tierney

  • Toni Cooper
  • David Sewell


  • American RadioWorks |
    (Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

    The First Family of Radio

    When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

    Recent Posts

    • 12.16.14

      Rising prices on the poorest

      In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
    • 12.08.14

      How Much Will College Cost My Family?

      In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
    • 12.01.14

      Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

      There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
    • 12.01.14

      Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

      I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.