American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Massachusetts

Senate

Edward Kennedy

  • David Bowen
  • Stephanie Cotte
  • David Dorsey
  • Amelia Dungan
  • Dora Hughes
  • Kathleen Kruse
  • Christopher Loftis
  • Kara Marchione
  • David Nexon
  • Jane Oates
  • Esther Olavarria
  • David Oliveria
  • Danica Petroshius
  • Ngozi Pole
  • Elizabeth Prescott
  • Kevin Richards
  • Roberto Rodriguez
  • Stacey Sachs
  • John Samuelian
  • David Sutphen
  • Marty Walsh
  • Sharon Waxman
  • Portia Wu

    John Kerry

  • George Abar
  • Kelly Bovio
  • John Dasilva
  • Gregory Dean
  • Jere Glover
  • Jeff Hamond
  • Celes Hughes
  • James Hunter
  • James Jones
  • Barry Lasala
  • Matthew Martin
  • Ryan Mccormick
  • David Mckean
  • Jonathan Miller
  • John Phillips
  • Nelson Reyneri
  • Lisa Rosenberg
  • Gregg Rothschild
  • Kevin Wheeler
  • James Wise
  • House

    Michael Capuano

  • Kate Auspitz
  • Bret Freedman
  • Lucy Heenan
  • Chris Huckleberry
  • Michelle Mancini
  • Kaitlin Mccolgan
  • Daniel Muroff
  • Jon Skarin
  • Jose Vaquerano

    William Delahunt

  • Mark Agrast
  • Julie Carr
  • Cliff Etammerman
  • Michele Jalbert
  • Christine Leonard
  • Steven Schwadron
  • Cliff Stammerman

    Barney Frank

  • Todd Cranford
  • Ricardo Delfin
  • Bob Foster
  • Bruno Freitas
  • Sandra Gibbs
  • Erika Jeffers
  • Jaime Lizarraga
  • Daniel Mcglinchey
  • Scott Morris
  • Roger Olson
  • Jeff Riky
  • Jeanne Roslanowick
  • Lawranne Stewart
  • Kenneth Swab

    Stephen Lynch

  • Kerry Lawrence
  • Kerry Mcginn
  • Caroline Powers
  • Robert Ryan
  • Alexandra Toma

    Edward Markey

  • Colin Crowell
  • Joseph Dalton
  • Jeffrey Duncan
  • Michal Freedhoff
  • Michal Freedhorr
  • David Moulton
  • Angelique Skoulas
  • Ana Unruh

    James Mcgovern

  • Edward Augustus
  • Cindy Buhl
  • Daniel Holt
  • Michael Meishon
  • Michael Mershon
  • Gladys Parker
  • Christopher Philbin
  • Keith Stern
  • Ryan Thrasher

    Marty Meehan

  • Suzanne Dumont
  • Amy Ford
  • Lori Loureiro
  • Joshua Lynn

    Joe Moakley

  • George Crawford
  • Stephen Larose

    Richard Neal

  • Daniel Houton
  • Ann Jablon
  • Bridgette Johnson
  • Ryan Kelly
  • Margaret Mcglinch
  • Melissa Mueller
  • Michael Prucker

    John Olver

  • Blair Anderson
  • Suzanne Dumont
  • Robert Gatehouse
  • Peter Irvine
  • Abbie Meador
  • Tricia Pistone
  • Meghan Riley
  • Ann Russo
  • Kristin Wood

    John Tierney

  • Toni Cooper
  • David Sewell


  • American RadioWorks |
    teaching-teachers

    Teaching Teachers

    Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

    Recent Posts

    • 08.27.15

      Rethinking teacher preparation

      In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
    • 08.27.15

      An American way of teaching

      In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
    • 08.27.15

      Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

      "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball
    • 08.27.15

      A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

      In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.