American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

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Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Kentucky

Senate

Jim Bunning

  • Bill Beaver
  • Jennifer Bonar
  • Jack Deuser
  • Lauren Hayden
  • Ann Liebschutz
  • John Mechem
  • Steve Patterson
  • Kim Taylor
  • David Young

    Mitch Mcconnell

  • John Abegg
  • Brytt Brooks
  • Larry Cox
  • Laura Haney
  • Brian Lewis
  • Robert Lewis
  • Charles Marshall
  • Malloy Mcdaniel
  • Scott O'malice
  • Laura Pemberton
  • Billy Piper
  • K Scott Raab
  • Leon Sequeira
  • Kyle Simmons
  • Pamela Simpson
  • Michael Solon
  • Tamars Somerville
  • Robert Steurer
  • Amy Swonger
  • Mason Wiggins
  • Mary Young
  • Michael Zehr
  • House

    Ben Chandler

  • James Creevy
  • Amy Hille
  • David Macknight
  • Alexis Rickher
  • Jason Sauer
  • Jennifer Spalding

    Geoff Davis

    Ernie Fletcher

  • Matthew Bassett
  • Phillip Brown
  • Bradford Campbell
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  • Matthew Mccullough
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    Ron Lewis

  • Kelley Ayers
  • Eric Bergren
  • Michael Dodge
  • Justin Groenert
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  • Richard Henkle
  • Daniel London
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  • Katherine Reding
  • Megan Spindel
  • Megan Tuck

    Ken Lucas

  • Jason Baird
  • Cheryl Brownell
  • Joe Clabes
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  • Mike Malaise
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    Anne Northup

  • Elizabeth Barr
  • Clinton Blair
  • Susan Brown
  • Kristi Craig
  • Sherri Craig
  • Alan Hanson
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    Harold Rogers

  • Shannon Boles
  • Leslie Cupp
  • Victoria Ewing
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  • Michael Higdon
  • Roger Libby
  • Sarah Paff
  • William Smith

    Edward Whitfield

  • Benjamin Beaton
  • Emily Chandler
  • Brent Dolen
  • Brett Hale
  • John Halliwell
  • Cory Hicks
  • Melissa Joiner
  • Erica Landrum
  • Karen Long
  • Jeff Miles
  • Michael Pape
  • Sandra Simpson
  • Lesley Stout
  • Jason Van Pelt


  • American RadioWorks |
    A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

    Ready to Work

    Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

    Recent Posts

    • 09.17.14

      A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

      At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
    • 09.11.14

      A 21st-century vocational high school

      For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
    • 09.10.14

      Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

      Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
    • 09.09.14

      The troubled history of vocational education

      Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.