American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Kentucky

Senate

Jim Bunning

  • Bill Beaver
  • Jennifer Bonar
  • Jack Deuser
  • Lauren Hayden
  • Ann Liebschutz
  • John Mechem
  • Steve Patterson
  • Kim Taylor
  • David Young

    Mitch Mcconnell

  • John Abegg
  • Brytt Brooks
  • Larry Cox
  • Laura Haney
  • Brian Lewis
  • Robert Lewis
  • Charles Marshall
  • Malloy Mcdaniel
  • Scott O'malice
  • Laura Pemberton
  • Billy Piper
  • K Scott Raab
  • Leon Sequeira
  • Kyle Simmons
  • Pamela Simpson
  • Michael Solon
  • Tamars Somerville
  • Robert Steurer
  • Amy Swonger
  • Mason Wiggins
  • Mary Young
  • Michael Zehr
  • House

    Ben Chandler

  • James Creevy
  • Amy Hille
  • David Macknight
  • Alexis Rickher
  • Jason Sauer
  • Jennifer Spalding

    Geoff Davis

    Ernie Fletcher

  • Matthew Bassett
  • Phillip Brown
  • Bradford Campbell
  • Daniel Groves
  • James Hightower
  • Matthew Mccullough
  • Nicholas Mirisis

    Ron Lewis

  • Kelley Ayers
  • Eric Bergren
  • Michael Dodge
  • Justin Groenert
  • Philip Hays
  • Richard Henkle
  • Daniel London
  • Kevin Modlin
  • Katherine Reding
  • Megan Spindel
  • Megan Tuck

    Ken Lucas

  • Jason Baird
  • Cheryl Brownell
  • Joe Clabes
  • Scott Kuschmider
  • Mike Malaise
  • Kathryn Ray
  • Danielle Vizgirda

    Anne Northup

  • Elizabeth Barr
  • Clinton Blair
  • Susan Brown
  • Kristi Craig
  • Sherri Craig
  • Alan Hanson
  • Johanna Kenny
  • David Rogers
  • John Smith
  • Brandon Steinmann
  • Christin Tinsworth

    Harold Rogers

  • Shannon Boles
  • Leslie Cupp
  • Victoria Ewing
  • Kevin Fromer
  • Michael Higdon
  • Roger Libby
  • Sarah Paff
  • William Smith

    Edward Whitfield

  • Benjamin Beaton
  • Emily Chandler
  • Brent Dolen
  • Brett Hale
  • John Halliwell
  • Cory Hicks
  • Melissa Joiner
  • Erica Landrum
  • Karen Long
  • Jeff Miles
  • Michael Pape
  • Sandra Simpson
  • Lesley Stout
  • Jason Van Pelt


  • American RadioWorks |
    boots-to-books

    From Boots to Books

    The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

    Recent Posts

    • 09.03.15

      The history of the GI Bill

      A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
    • 09.03.15

      The front lines of the long journey home

      Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
    • 09.03.15

      The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

      The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
    • 08.27.15

      A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

      In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.