American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

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Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Kansas

Senate

Sam Brownback

  • Courtney Anderson
  • J Thomas Brady
  • Doug Branch
  • Joshua Carter
  • Glen Chambers
  • Landon Fulmer
  • Cherie Harder
  • Sara Hessenflow
  • Erik Hotunire
  • Karen Knutson
  • Kevin Krufky
  • John Miller
  • Maggie Nelson
  • Jana Novak
  • Brent Orrell
  • Sharon Payt
  • Jim Rowland
  • Hannah Royal
  • Anna Shopey
  • George Stafford
  • Howard Waltzman
  • Rob Wasinger
  • Katherine Weyforth
  • Heather Wingate
  • James Wolff
  • La Rochelle Young

    Pat Roberts

  • Victor Baleo
  • James Beauchamp
  • Jennifer Cook
  • Jackie Cottrell
  • Ashleigh Dela Torre
  • Darren Dick
  • Todd Halstead
  • Matthew Howe
  • John Livingston
  • Michael Seyfert
  • Harold Stones
  • Jennifer Swenson
  • Chad Tenpenny
  • Caroline Walling
  • Keith Yehle
  • House

    Dennis Moore

  • Christie Appelhant
  • Howard Bauleke
  • Jason Cole
  • John Compton
  • Jana Denning
  • Becky Fast
  • Laura Hall
  • Peter Kay
  • Andrew Lewin
  • Julie Merz
  • Adam Pase
  • Jennifer Pechar

    Jerry Moran

  • Jennie Guttery
  • Thomas Hemmer
  • Jon Hixson
  • Kelli Ludlum
  • Trevor Mckeeman
  • Travis Murphy
  • Kip Peterson
  • Tyler Wegmeyer

    Jim Ryun

  • Nathaniel Bennett
  • Rebecca Elmore
  • Mark Kelly
  • Daniel Schneider

    Todd Tiahrt

  • Bradley Ayers
  • Kevin Bruce
  • Amy Brusch
  • Jeff Kahrs
  • Matt Rowden
  • Sam Sackett
  • Matt Schlapp


  • American RadioWorks |
    Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

    Can how you move change how you think?

    Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

    Recent Posts

    • 05.12.15

      Forest Schools

      What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
    • 05.06.15

      Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

      There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
    • 04.29.15

      Green Teachers

      A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
    • 04.22.15

      The First Gen Movement

      Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.