American RadioWorks |
living-legacy

The Living Legacy

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.15

    The history of HBCUs in America

    Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
  • 08.20.15

    Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

    Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
  • 08.20.15

    Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

    Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
  • 08.20.15

    The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

    Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?

American RadioWorks |
living-legacy

The Living Legacy

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.15

    The history of HBCUs in America

    Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
  • 08.20.15

    Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

    Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
  • 08.20.15

    Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

    Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
  • 08.20.15

    The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

    Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Kansas

Senate

Sam Brownback

  • Courtney Anderson
  • J Thomas Brady
  • Doug Branch
  • Joshua Carter
  • Glen Chambers
  • Landon Fulmer
  • Cherie Harder
  • Sara Hessenflow
  • Erik Hotunire
  • Karen Knutson
  • Kevin Krufky
  • John Miller
  • Maggie Nelson
  • Jana Novak
  • Brent Orrell
  • Sharon Payt
  • Jim Rowland
  • Hannah Royal
  • Anna Shopey
  • George Stafford
  • Howard Waltzman
  • Rob Wasinger
  • Katherine Weyforth
  • Heather Wingate
  • James Wolff
  • La Rochelle Young

    Pat Roberts

  • Victor Baleo
  • James Beauchamp
  • Jennifer Cook
  • Jackie Cottrell
  • Ashleigh Dela Torre
  • Darren Dick
  • Todd Halstead
  • Matthew Howe
  • John Livingston
  • Michael Seyfert
  • Harold Stones
  • Jennifer Swenson
  • Chad Tenpenny
  • Caroline Walling
  • Keith Yehle
  • House

    Dennis Moore

  • Christie Appelhant
  • Howard Bauleke
  • Jason Cole
  • John Compton
  • Jana Denning
  • Becky Fast
  • Laura Hall
  • Peter Kay
  • Andrew Lewin
  • Julie Merz
  • Adam Pase
  • Jennifer Pechar

    Jerry Moran

  • Jennie Guttery
  • Thomas Hemmer
  • Jon Hixson
  • Kelli Ludlum
  • Trevor Mckeeman
  • Travis Murphy
  • Kip Peterson
  • Tyler Wegmeyer

    Jim Ryun

  • Nathaniel Bennett
  • Rebecca Elmore
  • Mark Kelly
  • Daniel Schneider

    Todd Tiahrt

  • Bradley Ayers
  • Kevin Bruce
  • Amy Brusch
  • Jeff Kahrs
  • Matt Rowden
  • Sam Sackett
  • Matt Schlapp


  • American RadioWorks |
    living-legacy

    The Living Legacy

    Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

    Recent Posts

    • 08.20.15

      The history of HBCUs in America

      Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
    • 08.20.15

      Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

      Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
    • 08.20.15

      Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

      Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
    • 08.20.15

      The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

      Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?