American RadioWorks |
President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

Goodbye, College Ratings (For Now)

The Obama administration recently declared that it would no longer pursue a college ratings system based on accessibility, affordability and student success. And college presidents everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

Recent Posts

  • 07.23.15

    Sweet Briar Returns

    Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.
  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.

American RadioWorks |
President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

Goodbye, College Ratings (For Now)

The Obama administration recently declared that it would no longer pursue a college ratings system based on accessibility, affordability and student success. And college presidents everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

Recent Posts

  • 07.23.15

    Sweet Briar Returns

    Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.
  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Indiana

Senate

Evan Bayh

  • Aisha Carlisle
  • Andrew Cullen
  • Genevieve Cullen
  • Emily Duncan
  • Rob Ehrich
  • Joel Elliott
  • Elizabeth Fay
  • Desiree Filippone
  • Alastair Fitzpayne
  • Linda Forbes
  • Sohini Gupta-Jindal
  • Sohini Gyota
  • Jeff Hamond
  • Heidi Inman
  • Sonini Jindal
  • Mark Komblau
  • Megan Martin
  • Mary Meagher
  • David Menotti
  • David Mevotti
  • Michael Patterson
  • Phoebe Riner
  • Todd Rosenblum
  • Charles Salem
  • Tom Sugar
  • Cynthia Walker
  • Catherine Wojtasik
  • Dan Zipp

    Richard Lugar

  • Jessica Fugate
  • Andrew Semmel
  • Paul Sinders
  • Manisha Singh
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    Dan Burton

  • Heather Bailey
  • Kevin Binger
  • David Burian
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  • Jonathan Dilley
  • Garry Ewing
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  • Randall Kaplan
  • Caroline Katzin
  • Claudia Keller
  • Connie Lausten
  • Marlo Lewis
  • Toni Lightle
  • Kevin Long
  • Gloria Markus
  • Diane Menorca
  • Daniel Moll
  • Bill O'neill
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  • Kimberly Reed
  • George Rogers
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  • Mary Udovich
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  • William Waller
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    Chris Chocola

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    Baron Hill

  • Ryan Guthrie
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    John Hostettler

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    David Mcintosh

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    Edward Pease

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    Mike Sodrel

    Mark Souder

  • Andrew Coats
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  • James Harris
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  • Erika Heikkila
  • Tiffany Mulligan
  • Mark Pfundstein
  • Elizabeth Rogers

    Peter Visclosky

  • Heather Miller
  • Martin Muaky


  • American RadioWorks |
    President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

    Goodbye, College Ratings (For Now)

    The Obama administration recently declared that it would no longer pursue a college ratings system based on accessibility, affordability and student success. And college presidents everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

    Recent Posts

    • 07.23.15

      Sweet Briar Returns

      Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.
    • 07.15.15

      The Future of Historically Black Colleges

      Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
    • 07.07.15

      Talking About Race in Schools

      Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
    • 07.02.15

      Minorities and Special Ed

      For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.