American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.
  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.
  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.

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Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Indiana

Senate

Evan Bayh

  • Aisha Carlisle
  • Andrew Cullen
  • Genevieve Cullen
  • Emily Duncan
  • Rob Ehrich
  • Joel Elliott
  • Elizabeth Fay
  • Desiree Filippone
  • Alastair Fitzpayne
  • Linda Forbes
  • Sohini Gupta-Jindal
  • Sohini Gyota
  • Jeff Hamond
  • Heidi Inman
  • Sonini Jindal
  • Mark Komblau
  • Megan Martin
  • Mary Meagher
  • David Menotti
  • David Mevotti
  • Michael Patterson
  • Phoebe Riner
  • Todd Rosenblum
  • Charles Salem
  • Tom Sugar
  • Cynthia Walker
  • Catherine Wojtasik
  • Dan Zipp

    Richard Lugar

  • Jessica Fugate
  • Andrew Semmel
  • Paul Sinders
  • Manisha Singh
  • House

    Dan Burton

  • Heather Bailey
  • Kevin Binger
  • David Burian
  • J Vincent Chase
  • Jonathan Dilley
  • Garry Ewing
  • Brian Fauls
  • Dan Getz
  • Lawrence Halloran
  • Barbara Kahlow
  • Randall Kaplan
  • Caroline Katzin
  • Claudia Keller
  • Connie Lausten
  • Marlo Lewis
  • Toni Lightle
  • Kevin Long
  • Gloria Markus
  • Diane Menorca
  • Daniel Moll
  • Bill O'neill
  • R Nicholas Palarino
  • Kimberly Reed
  • George Rogers
  • Stephen Schatz
  • Dan Skopec
  • Brenda Summers
  • Robert Taub
  • Mary Udovich
  • Mary Valentino
  • Mark Walker
  • William Waller
  • Nathaniel Wienecke
  • Corinne Zaccagnini

    Steve Buyer

  • Danelle Bowsher
  • Michael Copher
  • Kelly Craven
  • Myrna Dugan
  • Daniel Garcia
  • Kathryn Mcnabb
  • Laura Zuckerman

    Julia Carson

  • Richard Allen
  • Melody Barber
  • Marti Doneghy
  • Adairius Gardner
  • Chris Goldfarb
  • Erin Kraabel
  • Teri Morgan
  • Deron Roberson
  • Susan Role
  • Stephen Visher
  • Michael Wallace

    Chris Chocola

  • Sarah Anderson
  • Brooks Kochvar
  • Brooks Kochvas
  • Katie Pike
  • Robert Vernon

    Baron Hill

  • Ryan Guthrie
  • Anne Keller
  • Jeannette Murray-Mount
  • Matt Pierce
  • Lisa Shelton
  • Eugene Wilk
  • John Williams

    John Hostettler

  • Alison Applegate-Slatter
  • Erin Berry

    Brian Kerns

  • David Clark
  • William Maxam

    David Mcintosh

  • Krista Kafer
  • John Steele

    Edward Pease

  • William Maxam

    Mike Pence

  • Ron Arnold
  • Skip Brown
  • Sheila Cole
  • Ryan Fisher
  • Leanne Holdman
  • Matt Lloyd
  • William Smith
  • Paul Teller
  • Patrick Wilson

    Tim Roemer

  • Mark Brown
  • Margaret Mcdow
  • Sarah Schultz
  • Pete Spiro

    Mike Sodrel

    Mark Souder

  • Andrew Coats
  • Amy Davenport
  • Angela Flood
  • James Harris
  • Teri Hasdorff
  • Erika Heikkila
  • Tiffany Mulligan
  • Mark Pfundstein
  • Elizabeth Rogers

    Peter Visclosky

  • Heather Miller
  • Martin Muaky


  • American RadioWorks |
    (Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

    The First Family of Radio

    When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

    Recent Posts

    • 12.23.14

      Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

      The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.
    • 12.16.14

      Rising prices on the poorest

      In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
    • 12.08.14

      How Much Will College Cost My Family?

      In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
    • 12.01.14

      Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

      There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.