American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Iowa

Senate

Charles Grassley

  • Jonathan Blum
  • Patrick Bousliman
  • Richard Chriss
  • Andrea Cohen
  • Faith Cristol
  • Kolan Davis
  • Mary Day
  • Janet Drew
  • Linda Fishman
  • Kate Kirchynabe
  • Kurt Kovarik
  • Sherry Kuntz
  • Ed Mcclellan
  • Christy Mistr
  • Kathy Nuebel
  • William Olson
  • Elizabeth Paris
  • Mark Prater
  • Colin Roskey
  • Carolyn Smith

    Tom Harkin

  • Brian Ahlberg
  • Richard Bender
  • Sabrina Corlette
  • William Even
  • Michele Evermore
  • Alison Fox
  • Adam Gluck
  • Maria Gutierrez
  • Kristofer Hagglund
  • Mark Halverson
  • Eric Juzenas
  • Susan Keith
  • Dianne Liepa
  • Stephanie Mercier
  • Alisa Mocris
  • Doug O'brien
  • Peter Reinecke
  • Lloyd Ritter
  • Bev Schroeder
  • Chani Wiggins
  • House

    Leonard Boswell

  • Sally Bowzer
  • Jay Byers
  • Elizabeth Carter
  • Heather Matson
  • Tammy Mcathey

    Greg Ganske

    Steve King

  • Nicole Gustafson
  • Paul Raak
  • Brandon Renz

    Tom Latham

  • Kevin Berents
  • Michael Gruber

    Jim Leach

  • Mary Andrus
  • Michael Borden
  • Amy Butler
  • Julie Duhme
  • James Mccormick
  • Gary Parker
  • David Renkel
  • Gregory Wierzynski
  • Naomi Zeff

    Jim Nussle

  • James Bater
  • James Cantwell
  • Rich Meade
  • Jeremy Miller
  • Edward Puccerella
  • Ryan Romito
  • Sean Spicer
  • Joe Wheeler
  • Tom Wolfe


  • American RadioWorks |
    teaching-teachers

    Teaching Teachers

    Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

    Recent Posts

    • 08.27.15

      An American way of teaching

      In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
    • 08.27.15

      Rethinking teacher preparation

      In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
    • 08.27.15

      A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

      In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
    • 08.27.15

      Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

      "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball