American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 12.16.14

    Rising prices on the poorest

    In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
  • 12.08.14

    How Much Will College Cost My Family?

    In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
  • 12.01.14

    Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

    There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
  • 12.01.14

    Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

    I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Florida

Senate

Bob Graham

  • Paul Anderson
  • Caroline Berver
  • Peter Dorn
  • Robert Filippone
  • Kasey Gillette
  • Robert Greenawalt
  • J Bryant Hall
  • James Hall
  • Christopher Jackson
  • Rori Kramer
  • Lisa Layman
  • Henry Menn
  • Melanie Nathanson
  • Zeviel Simpser
  • Tiffany Smith
  • Dana Stefanelli
  • Amanda Wood

    Connie Mack

  • Andrew Cantor
  • James Carter
  • Kevin Doyle
  • Chris Edwards
  • Christopher Frenze
  • Wendy Grubbs
  • James Gwartney
  • Lee Johnson
  • C K Lee
  • Peter Levin
  • Jordan Paul
  • Howard Rosen
  • Kurt Schulet
  • Mark Smith
  • Victor Wolski

    Mel Martinez

  • Frederick Baird
  • Michael Bassett
  • Brian Darling
  • Brydon Ross

    Bill Nelson

  • Jaime Allentuck
  • Shahra Anderson
  • Rashahra Andreson
  • Celeste Brown
  • Peter Contostavlos
  • Jon Cooper
  • Leanna Gutierrez
  • Erin Hatch
  • Reg Leichty
  • Kim Luckey
  • Daniel Mclaughlin
  • Sheila Nix
  • Dan Shapiro
  • Michael Sozan
  • Caroline Tess
  • Bridget Walsh
  • House

    Michael Bilirakis

  • Jeremy Allen
  • Anne Elizabeth Esposito
  • Rebecca Hyder
  • Carrie Melvin
  • Erin Ockunzzi
  • Sarah Owen
  • Christy Stefadouros
  • Steven Tilton
  • Matthew Tuten

    F. Allen Boyd

  • Jennifer Cannon
  • Elizabeth Green
  • Elizabeth Greer
  • Colleen Kroll
  • Jim Norton
  • Charla Penn
  • Robert Pickels
  • Diane Pratt
  • Christopher Schloesser
  • Craig Stevens
  • Matt Sulkala

    Corrine Brown

  • Gretchen Hitchner
  • Roshan Hodge
  • Nicholas Martinelli
  • Yvonne Reed
  • Monica Sheffield
  • Elias Simmons
  • David Simon
  • Adrian Wright

    Ginny Brown-Waite

  • Shirley Anderson
  • Serena Underwood
  • Brian Walsh
  • Amie Woeber

    Charles Canady

  • John Delmore
  • Karen Williams
  • Stacey Windham

    Ander Crenshaw

  • John Ariale
  • Francis Gibbs
  • Michelle Presson
  • Nathan Riska
  • Ray Smith
  • Erica Striebel
  • Susan Warner
  • Ronald Whitaker

    Jim Davis

  • Tricia Barrentine
  • Suzanne Farmer
  • Tracy Nagelbush
  • J J Piskadlo

    Peter Deutsch

  • Elizabeth Assey
  • Matthew Chiller
  • Howard Hechler
  • Frank Hirst
  • Fritz Hirst
  • Rebecca Iannotta
  • Eric Lynn
  • Robin Rorapaugh
  • Anne Wilson

    Lincoln Diaz-Balart

  • Ana Carbonell
  • Stephen Cote
  • Mark Gaspers
  • Cesar Gonzalez
  • Elizabeth Humphrey
  • Jordan Paul

    Mario Diaz-Balart

  • Charles Cooper
  • Omar Franco
  • Lauren Robitaille

    Tom Feeney

  • Jennifer Chester
  • Sherry Dudley
  • Myal Greene
  • Cheryl Moore
  • Jason Roe
  • Brandon Steinmann
  • Jessica Taylor
  • Ryan Visco
  • Netonis Wybensinger

    Mark Foley

  • Parker Altman
  • Lisa Barkovic
  • Ramona Bean
  • Walter Ditto
  • Thomas Donhauser
  • Tod Donhauser
  • Michele Famiglietti
  • Kirk Fordham
  • Amy Freeman
  • John Hildreth
  • John Mac
  • Steve Martino
  • Elizabeth Nicolson

    Tillie Fowler

  • David Gilliland
  • Stephanie Kopelousos

    Porter Goss

  • Anna Raymond
  • Darren Willcox
  • Sheryl Wooley

    Katherine Harris

  • Geoffrey Harriman
  • Benjamin Mckay
  • Benjamin Mckey
  • Jennifer Platt
  • Miguel Romano
  • Christopher Schons
  • Ryan Work

    Alcee Hastings

  • David Goldenberg
  • Jason Harris
  • Fred Turner

    Ric Keller

  • Dana Johnson
  • Bryan Malenius
  • Jaclyn Norris
  • Michael Shutley
  • Brandon Steinmann

    Connie Mack

  • Francis Gibbs
  • Frederick Leatherwood
  • Connie Mack

    Bill Mccollum

  • Sarah Dumont
  • Jennifer Sikora

    Carrie Meek

  • Leticia Mederos
  • Cecelia Morton
  • John Schelble
  • Sumitra Siram
  • Shashrina Thomas
  • Tola Thompson

    Kendrick Meek

  • Tasha Cole
  • Sabrina Nawalrai
  • Joyce Postell
  • John Schelble
  • Clarence Williams

    John Mica

  • Gary Burns
  • Miguel Cosio
  • James Deck
  • Joshua Gaboton
  • Sharon Pinkerton
  • Mikell Reynolds
  • Russell Roberts

    Dan Miller

  • Jennifer Biggy
  • Thad Bingel
  • Paul Pisano
  • Amy Steinmann
  • Ronald Whitaker
  • Glenda Wright

    Jeff Miller

  • Justin Hamilton
  • Daniel Mcfaul
  • Anne Pizzato

    Adam Putnam

  • Timothy Coleman
  • John Hambel
  • Christopher Shields
  • Corinne Stevens
  • Casey Welch
  • Karen Williams

    Ileana Ros-Lehtinen

  • Alex Cruz
  • Arthur Estopinan
  • Lucille Lewis
  • Julie Philp
  • Rodolfo Pina
  • Frederick Ratliff
  • Mariia Zimmerman

    Joe Scarborough

  • Jennifer Hemingway

    E. Clay Shaw

  • Bob Castro
  • Chad Davis
  • Eric Eikenberg
  • Tanner Gilreath
  • Michael Harrington
  • Christine Pollack
  • Michael Sewell

    Cliff Stearns

  • Ali Amirhooshmand
  • Lana Breeden
  • Veronica Crowe
  • Nick Dietzer
  • David Hickey
  • James Hill
  • Kevin Holmgren
  • Matthew Mandel
  • Jack Seum
  • Lauren Smith
  • Joan Smutko

    Karen Thurman

  • Robert Dobek
  • Amanda Newman
  • Jonathan Poverud
  • Seth Radus

    Debbie Wasserman Schultz

  • Jonathan Beeton

    Dave Weldon

  • W Burns
  • David Christensen
  • Erin Coyle
  • Brendan Curry
  • Dana Gartzke
  • Jaillene Honter
  • Eric Keber

    Robert Wexler

  • Debra Armentrout
  • Eva Cargill
  • James De Jesus
  • Eric Johnson
  • Jonathan Katz
  • Jacob Kurtz
  • Jacob Kurtzer
  • Lale Mamaux
  • Ellen Mclaren
  • Joshua Rogin
  • Halie Soifer
  • Suzanne Stoll
  • Halie Suifer
  • Lisa White
  • Eugene Wilk

    C.W. Young

  • Loretta Beaumont
  • Susan Firth
  • Tad Gallion
  • Dennis Kern
  • Dale Oak
  • Charles Parkinson
  • Francine Salvador
  • John Scofield
  • Nicq Snyder
  • Michael Stephens


  • American RadioWorks |
    (Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

    The First Family of Radio

    When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

    Recent Posts

    • 12.16.14

      Rising prices on the poorest

      In January 2014 nearly a hundred college presidents gathered at the White House for a summit on the rising cost of college. But data show that those same institutions have been raising their prices fastest for the poorest students than for wealthier ones. This week on the podcast, we talk to a reporter who has been following the rising college cost burden on poor families.
    • 12.08.14

      How Much Will College Cost My Family?

      In 2011 the federal government required colleges and universities to publish “net price calculators” on their web sites. These tools are supposed to help families figure out which colleges they can afford. The calculators take into account family income, number of kids in college, state of residency, and other factors. But they’re often hard to use and time-consuming. Our guest this week has made this process simpler and more accessible.
    • 12.01.14

      Bridging the “Middle Skills” Gap

      There’s a paradox in today’s job market: even though there are millions of people looking for work, employers say they can’t find enough qualified workers. That’s due to an abundance of what economists call “middle skills” jobs – jobs that require specialized training beyond high school, but not a four-year college degree.
    • 12.01.14

      Commentary: Turning the tables on the vocational ed debate

      I’m not arguing that all education should be about acquiring job skills ... I’m saying that good vocational high schools have figured out how to bring college prep into their curriculum. And it’s time that traditional academic high schools brought more vocational education into theirs.