American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.

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Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Connecticut

Senate

Christopher Dodd

  • Ben Berwick
  • Sheryl Cohen
  • Sheila Duffy
  • Marvin Fast
  • James Fenton
  • Kennie Gill
  • Karin Heitert
  • Julius Horwish
  • Shawn Maher
  • Mary Ellen Mcguire
  • Robert Zarnetske

    Joseph Lieberman

  • Michael Alexander
  • William Andresen
  • Deborah Bager
  • William Bonvillian
  • Sherry Brown
  • Alyssondra Campaigne
  • Kiersten Coon
  • Kirsten Cutler
  • Frederick Downey
  • Deborah Forrest
  • Sara Haeigh
  • Adam Kovacevich
  • Yul Kwon
  • Kevin Landy
  • Cynthia Lemek
  • Hadassah Lieberman
  • Peter Ludgin
  • Charles Ludlam
  • Merrilea Mayo
  • Michelle Mcmurry
  • James O'connell
  • Tim Profeta
  • Susan Propper
  • Joyce Rechtschaffen
  • Clarine Riddle
  • Laurie Rubenstein
  • Aaron Scholer
  • Michele Stockwell
  • John Tagami
  • Melissa Winter
  • Andrew Young
  • House

    Rosa Delauro

  • Joshua Farrelman
  • Brigid O'brien
  • Rebecca Salay
  • Sarah Walkling
  • Elizabeth Westbrook
  • James Wise

    Sam Gejdenson

  • Sean Carroll
  • Amos Hochstein
  • Steven Keenan
  • Robert King
  • Tanya Shamson
  • Peter Yeo

    Nancy Johnson

  • Suanna Bruinooge
  • Jaime Cheshire
  • Susan Christensen
  • Dan Elling
  • Todd Funk
  • Dave Karvelas
  • Douglas Lathrop
  • Shane Lieberman
  • Christopher Morgan
  • Michele Nellenbach
  • Brian Schubert

    John Larson

  • William Cable
  • Holly Canevari
  • Elliot Ginsberg
  • Brian Mahar
  • Ellen Mccarthy
  • Tiffani Mendivil
  • Jonathan Renfrew
  • George Shevlin
  • Sterling Spriggs

    James Maloney

  • Ayal Frank
  • James Nastus
  • Thomas Santos
  • Catherine Wojtasik

    Christopher Shays

  • Amy Bahel
  • Kristina Crooks
  • Hagar Hajjar
  • Elisabeth Hawkings
  • Larry Holden
  • Catherine Levinson
  • Katie Levinson
  • Matthew Meyer
  • Elena Padin
  • R Nicholas Palarino
  • Paul Pimentel
  • Jordan Press
  • Danielle Rosengarten
  • Diana Washington

    Robert Simmons

  • Jennifer Diggins
  • Michael Dillon
  • Shauna Hewes
  • Michael Liles
  • James Mitchell
  • Jeff Nelson
  • Amy Pellegrino


  • American RadioWorks |
    (Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

    The First Family of Radio

    When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

    Recent Posts

    • 11.17.14

      The Utility of a PhD

      Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
    • 11.10.14

      Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

      President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
    • 11.12.14

      The Roosevelts as a political team

      Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
    • 11.10.14

      Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

      Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.