American RadioWorks |
living-legacy

The Living Legacy

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.15

    The history of HBCUs in America

    Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
  • 08.20.15

    Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

    Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
  • 08.20.15

    Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

    Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
  • 08.20.15

    The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

    Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?

American RadioWorks |
living-legacy

The Living Legacy

Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.15

    The history of HBCUs in America

    Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
  • 08.20.15

    Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

    Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
  • 08.20.15

    Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

    Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
  • 08.20.15

    The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

    Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Connecticut

Senate

Christopher Dodd

  • Ben Berwick
  • Sheryl Cohen
  • Sheila Duffy
  • Marvin Fast
  • James Fenton
  • Kennie Gill
  • Karin Heitert
  • Julius Horwish
  • Shawn Maher
  • Mary Ellen Mcguire
  • Robert Zarnetske

    Joseph Lieberman

  • Michael Alexander
  • William Andresen
  • Deborah Bager
  • William Bonvillian
  • Sherry Brown
  • Alyssondra Campaigne
  • Kiersten Coon
  • Kirsten Cutler
  • Frederick Downey
  • Deborah Forrest
  • Sara Haeigh
  • Adam Kovacevich
  • Yul Kwon
  • Kevin Landy
  • Cynthia Lemek
  • Hadassah Lieberman
  • Peter Ludgin
  • Charles Ludlam
  • Merrilea Mayo
  • Michelle Mcmurry
  • James O'connell
  • Tim Profeta
  • Susan Propper
  • Joyce Rechtschaffen
  • Clarine Riddle
  • Laurie Rubenstein
  • Aaron Scholer
  • Michele Stockwell
  • John Tagami
  • Melissa Winter
  • Andrew Young
  • House

    Rosa Delauro

  • Joshua Farrelman
  • Brigid O'brien
  • Rebecca Salay
  • Sarah Walkling
  • Elizabeth Westbrook
  • James Wise

    Sam Gejdenson

  • Sean Carroll
  • Amos Hochstein
  • Steven Keenan
  • Robert King
  • Tanya Shamson
  • Peter Yeo

    Nancy Johnson

  • Suanna Bruinooge
  • Jaime Cheshire
  • Susan Christensen
  • Dan Elling
  • Todd Funk
  • Dave Karvelas
  • Douglas Lathrop
  • Shane Lieberman
  • Christopher Morgan
  • Michele Nellenbach
  • Brian Schubert

    John Larson

  • William Cable
  • Holly Canevari
  • Elliot Ginsberg
  • Brian Mahar
  • Ellen Mccarthy
  • Tiffani Mendivil
  • Jonathan Renfrew
  • George Shevlin
  • Sterling Spriggs

    James Maloney

  • Ayal Frank
  • James Nastus
  • Thomas Santos
  • Catherine Wojtasik

    Christopher Shays

  • Amy Bahel
  • Kristina Crooks
  • Hagar Hajjar
  • Elisabeth Hawkings
  • Larry Holden
  • Catherine Levinson
  • Katie Levinson
  • Matthew Meyer
  • Elena Padin
  • R Nicholas Palarino
  • Paul Pimentel
  • Jordan Press
  • Danielle Rosengarten
  • Diana Washington

    Robert Simmons

  • Jennifer Diggins
  • Michael Dillon
  • Shauna Hewes
  • Michael Liles
  • James Mitchell
  • Jeff Nelson
  • Amy Pellegrino


  • American RadioWorks |
    living-legacy

    The Living Legacy

    Before the civil rights movement, African Americans were largely barred from white-dominated institutions of higher education. And so black Americans, and their white supporters, founded their own schools, which came to be known as Historically Black Colleges and Universities. HBCU graduates helped launch the civil rights movement, built the black middle class, and staffed the pulpits of black churches and the halls of almost every black primary school before the 1960s. But after desegregation, some people began to ask whether HBCUs had outlived their purpose. Yet for the students who attend them, HBCUs still play a crucial -- and unique -- role. In this documentary, we hear first-person testimony from students about why they chose an HBCU; and we travel to an HBCU that’s in the process of reinventing itself wholesale.

    Recent Posts

    • 08.20.15

      The history of HBCUs in America

      Zach Hubert came out of slavery with an adage that he would pass on to his children, and his children's children, and their children down the line. "Get your education," he would always say to them when his family gathered together in later years. "It's the one thing they can't take away from you."
    • 08.20.15

      Lilian Spriggs: ‘When I look at HBCUs, I think of independence’

      Lilian Spriggs is an audio production major at Howard University, from Jackson, Mississippi. After graduation, she wants to work as an on-air personality at a radio station.
    • 08.20.15

      Lysious Ogolo: ‘I didn’t know what a historically black college was’

      Lysious Ogolo is an audio production major at Howard University. He's originally from Nigeria, and moved to the United States with his family in 2008 when he was 18 years old.
    • 08.20.15

      The reinvention of Paul Quinn College

      Paul Quinn College was a sorry sight when Michael Sorrell, the school's fifth president in as many years, drove onto the Dallas campus to see what he was dealing with. As Sorrell looked around campus, he had one thought. How do you save a school that everyone thinks is already dead?