American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

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Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Colorado

Senate

Wayne Allard

  • Janet Bowers
  • Roger Brown
  • John Carson
  • Andrew Colosimo
  • Sean Conway
  • Charles Cozar
  • Doug Flanders
  • Cory Gardner
  • Erik Heilman
  • Robin Landauer
  • Ian Lyle
  • Amanda Mckinley
  • Brooke Morton
  • Jayson Roehl
  • Ryan Vitkus
  • Derek Wagner
  • Tewana Wilkerson

    Ben Nighthorse Campbell

  • Frank Fannan

    Ken Salazar

  • Melissa Koenigsberg
  • House

    Bob Beauprez

  • Christopher Allen
  • Danielle Devere
  • Sean Murphy
  • Amy Warder

    Diana Degette

  • Shannon Good
  • Dawn Patrice Jackson
  • Meghan Taira

    Joel Hefley

  • Rebecca Anfinson
  • Mary Suzanne Archuleta
  • Sarah Shelden
  • Reed Slack

    Scott Mcinnis

  • Christopher Allen
  • Mitchell Butler
  • Christopher Hatcher
  • Michael Hesse
  • Jon Hrobsky
  • J. Karen Paulson
  • Jason Reese
  • David Sprenger

    Marilyn Musgrave

  • Krista Brinkley
  • Jacob Leis
  • Betty Nikkel
  • Craig Rushing
  • Guy Short

    John Salazar

  • Richard Baca
  • Peter Hinga
  • Laura Marquez
  • Brian Ross
  • Shane Schulz

    Bob Schaffer

  • Krista Brinkley
  • Oleh Chernyk
  • Brandi Graham
  • Xenia Horczakiwskyj
  • Aaron Johnson
  • Marjorie Klein
  • Erika Lestelle
  • Doug Mesecar
  • Jonathan Palmer

    Thomas Tancredo

  • James Bergeron
  • Matthew Knoedler
  • Dan Kopelman
  • Greg Meyer
  • Molly Miller
  • Jacqueline Ponder
  • Jacque Powder
  • Christopher Rorick
  • Edmund Van Keuren
  • Mac Arthur Zimmerman
  • Macarthur Zimmernan

    Mark Udall

  • Jennifer Barrett
  • Cookab Hashemi
  • Jodanna Haskins
  • Kaitlyn O'hara
  • Lawrence Pacheco


  • American RadioWorks |
    Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

    Can how you move change how you think?

    Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

    Recent Posts

    • 05.12.15

      Forest Schools

      What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
    • 05.06.15

      Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

      There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
    • 04.29.15

      Green Teachers

      A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
    • 04.22.15

      The First Gen Movement

      Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.