American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Alaska

Senate

Frank Murkowski

  • James Beirne
  • Joseph Brenckle
  • Colleen Deegan
  • Christine Drager
  • David Dye
  • Isaac Edwards
  • Kathleen Elder
  • Ivette Fernandez
  • Charles Freeman
  • David Garman
  • Joel Gilbertson
  • Kelly Johnson
  • Daniel Kish
  • Andrew Lundquist
  • Brian Malnak
  • Nancy Murkowski
  • Kristin Phillips
  • Howard Useem
  • William Woolf

    Lisa Murkowski

  • Isaac Edwards
  • Ivette Fernandez
  • Charles Kleeschulte

    Ted Stevens

  • M Sidney Ashworth
  • Christine Drager
  • Ruth Ernst
  • Andrew Givens
  • Tom Hawkins
  • James Hayes
  • Lesley Kalan
  • Christine Kurth
  • George Lowe
  • Jennifer Lowe
  • Jason Mulvihill
  • Matthew Paxton
  • Mitch Rose
  • David Russell
  • Justin Stiefel
  • Lisa Sutherland
  • Brian Wilson
  • John Young
  • House

    Don Young

  • Cynthia Ahwinona
  • John Anderson
  • Michael Anderson
  • Sharon Barkeloo
  • James Berard
  • Susan Bodine
  • Geoff Bowman
  • Levon Boyagian
  • John Brennan
  • Trinita Brown
  • Art Chan
  • Colin Chapman
  • Kurt Christensen
  • Charles Cogar
  • William Condit
  • James Coon
  • Doug Crandell
  • Amy Denicore
  • Kathie Donnelly
  • Raga Elim
  • Jennifer Esposito
  • Robert Faber
  • Ken Fisher
  • Jean Flemma
  • Allen Freemyer
  • Ann Gibson
  • Duane Gibson
  • Giles Giovinazzi
  • Joe Graziano
  • Michael Henry
  • John Herren
  • David Heymsfeld
  • Graham Hill
  • Kenneth House
  • Robert Howarth
  • Matthew Hyde
  • David Jansen
  • Joshua Johnson
  • Lloyd Jones
  • Kenneth Kopacis
  • Kenneth Kopocis
  • John Lawrence
  • Holly Lyons
  • Karen Maldarelli
  • Ralph Marshall
  • Ward Mccarragher
  • Elizabeth Megginson
  • Derek Miller
  • James Miller
  • Frances Mulvey
  • Roger Nober
  • Sara Parsons
  • Jonathan Pawlow
  • John Rishel
  • Joyce Rose
  • Glenn Scammel
  • David Schaffer
  • John Scheib
  • Ryan Seiger
  • Jess Sharp
  • Dan Shulman
  • Anastasia Soumbeniotis
  • Justin Sprinzen
  • Mike Strachn
  • Suzanne Te Beau
  • Gregory Thom
  • Grant Thompson
  • Adam Tsao
  • James Tymon
  • Jonathan Upchurch
  • Fraser Vernisio
  • Fraser Verrusio
  • Matthew Wallen
  • David Whaley
  • Clyde Woodle
  • Holly Woodruff
  • Holly Woodruff Lyons
  • Mark Zachares
  • Kathleen Zeen


  • American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
    Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

    Greater Expectations

    The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

    Recent Posts

    • 08.29.14

      Greater Expectations transcript

    • 08.28.14

      A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

      New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
    • 08.28.14

      Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

      New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
    • 08.28.14

      Questioning the Common Core tests

      In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.