American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.24.14

    Academic Fraud and College Athletics

    Last month the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill released a report that showed evidence of nearly two decades of academic fraud perpetuated by the school’s Afro-American Studies Department. An investigation found certain professors and administrators had an unwritten policy of “propping up” student athletes. This week on the podcast, we look at academic fraud at colleges with high-stakes sports programs.
  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.24.14

    Academic Fraud and College Athletics

    Last month the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill released a report that showed evidence of nearly two decades of academic fraud perpetuated by the school’s Afro-American Studies Department. An investigation found certain professors and administrators had an unwritten policy of “propping up” student athletes. This week on the podcast, we look at academic fraud at colleges with high-stakes sports programs.
  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.

Back to The Data

Congresspersons and traveling staff for

Alaska

Senate

Frank Murkowski

  • James Beirne
  • Joseph Brenckle
  • Colleen Deegan
  • Christine Drager
  • David Dye
  • Isaac Edwards
  • Kathleen Elder
  • Ivette Fernandez
  • Charles Freeman
  • David Garman
  • Joel Gilbertson
  • Kelly Johnson
  • Daniel Kish
  • Andrew Lundquist
  • Brian Malnak
  • Nancy Murkowski
  • Kristin Phillips
  • Howard Useem
  • William Woolf

    Lisa Murkowski

  • Isaac Edwards
  • Ivette Fernandez
  • Charles Kleeschulte

    Ted Stevens

  • M Sidney Ashworth
  • Christine Drager
  • Ruth Ernst
  • Andrew Givens
  • Tom Hawkins
  • James Hayes
  • Lesley Kalan
  • Christine Kurth
  • George Lowe
  • Jennifer Lowe
  • Jason Mulvihill
  • Matthew Paxton
  • Mitch Rose
  • David Russell
  • Justin Stiefel
  • Lisa Sutherland
  • Brian Wilson
  • John Young
  • House

    Don Young

  • Cynthia Ahwinona
  • John Anderson
  • Michael Anderson
  • Sharon Barkeloo
  • James Berard
  • Susan Bodine
  • Geoff Bowman
  • Levon Boyagian
  • John Brennan
  • Trinita Brown
  • Art Chan
  • Colin Chapman
  • Kurt Christensen
  • Charles Cogar
  • William Condit
  • James Coon
  • Doug Crandell
  • Amy Denicore
  • Kathie Donnelly
  • Raga Elim
  • Jennifer Esposito
  • Robert Faber
  • Ken Fisher
  • Jean Flemma
  • Allen Freemyer
  • Ann Gibson
  • Duane Gibson
  • Giles Giovinazzi
  • Joe Graziano
  • Michael Henry
  • John Herren
  • David Heymsfeld
  • Graham Hill
  • Kenneth House
  • Robert Howarth
  • Matthew Hyde
  • David Jansen
  • Joshua Johnson
  • Lloyd Jones
  • Kenneth Kopacis
  • Kenneth Kopocis
  • John Lawrence
  • Holly Lyons
  • Karen Maldarelli
  • Ralph Marshall
  • Ward Mccarragher
  • Elizabeth Megginson
  • Derek Miller
  • James Miller
  • Frances Mulvey
  • Roger Nober
  • Sara Parsons
  • Jonathan Pawlow
  • John Rishel
  • Joyce Rose
  • Glenn Scammel
  • David Schaffer
  • John Scheib
  • Ryan Seiger
  • Jess Sharp
  • Dan Shulman
  • Anastasia Soumbeniotis
  • Justin Sprinzen
  • Mike Strachn
  • Suzanne Te Beau
  • Gregory Thom
  • Grant Thompson
  • Adam Tsao
  • James Tymon
  • Jonathan Upchurch
  • Fraser Vernisio
  • Fraser Verrusio
  • Matthew Wallen
  • David Whaley
  • Clyde Woodle
  • Holly Woodruff
  • Holly Woodruff Lyons
  • Mark Zachares
  • Kathleen Zeen


  • American RadioWorks |
    (Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

    The First Family of Radio

    When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

    Recent Posts

    • 11.24.14

      Academic Fraud and College Athletics

      Last month the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill released a report that showed evidence of nearly two decades of academic fraud perpetuated by the school’s Afro-American Studies Department. An investigation found certain professors and administrators had an unwritten policy of “propping up” student athletes. This week on the podcast, we look at academic fraud at colleges with high-stakes sports programs.
    • 11.17.14

      The Utility of a PhD

      Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
    • 11.10.14

      Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

      President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
    • 11.12.14

      The Roosevelts as a political team

      Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.