American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

Back to The Data

Office of

Thomas Carper


Total cost of 51 office trips: $74,844.60


Trips by Thomas Carper
Total cost of congressperson's 12 trips: $21,220.27

Destination: LAS VEGAS, NV-PHILADELPHIA, PA
Sponsor: Edison Electric Institute
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT FOR EDISON ELECTRIC INSTITUTE CONFERENCE, ATTEND BROOKINGS INSTITUTE CONFERENCE
Date: Jan 9, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $651.81
source

Destination: MACKINAC ISLAND, MI
Sponsor: Democratic Leadership Council
Purpose: DLC RESCHEDULED SPRING MEETING
Date: Sep 12, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $1,604.63
source

Destination: BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS
Sponsor: American Bar Association
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT AT NATIONAL CLASS ACTION CLE PROGRAM (CONTINUING LEGAL EDUCATION) GOOD FAITH ESTIMATE FILED ON 11/3/03, DELAY IN GETTING ACTUAL REIMBURSEMENT AMOUNT FROM THE ABA
Date: Oct 3, 2003
Expense: $451.50
source

Destination: THE GREENBRIER, WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, WEST VIRGINIA
Sponsor: Business-Government Relations Council
Purpose: THE BUSINESS GOVERNMENT RELATIONS COUNCIL ANNUAL CONFERENCE, SENATOR CARPER SPOKE ON A PANEL REGARDING CLASS ACTION REFORM, WITH A NUMBER OF OTHER MEMBERS OF CONGRESS
Date: Oct 17, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $1,486.60
source

Destination: NEW YORK CITY, NY
Sponsor: Democratic Leadership Council
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN NATIONAL STAKEHOLDERS MEETINGS TO DISCUSS POLICY/MESSAGE STRATEGY FOR THE COMING YEAR
Date: Dec 11, 2003
Expense: $392.01
source

Destination: DETROIT, MICHIGAN
Sponsor: Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers Inc
Purpose: FACT FINDING MEETING IN DETROIT
Date: Jan 3, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,554.79
source

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: Securities Industry Association
Purpose: MEETINGS WITH HIGH LEVEL EXECUTIVES OF FINANCIAL SERVICES COMPANIES, ARRANGED BY SIA. NOTE: A PORTION OF THE TRAVEL EXPENSES INCLUDE 1/3 THE COST OF A SHARED PRIVATE CAR USED FOR TRANSPORTATION IN NYC
Date: Mar 18, 2004
Expense: $412.36
source

Destination: AMELIA ISLAND, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Democratic Leadership Council
Purpose: DLC SPRING RETREAT, SENATOR CARPER WAS A SPEAKER AT A BREAKFAST PANEL ON 3/27
Date: Mar 26, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,662.98
source

Destination: JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Railway Supply Institute
Purpose: SENATOR CARPER ADDRESSED THE 2004 RSI SPRING LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE
Date: Apr 14, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,971.04
source

Destination: WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, WV
Sponsor: Business-Government Relations Council
Purpose: ANNUAL MEETING, SENATOR CARPER ADDRESSED ATTENDEES REGARDING ISSUES FACING CONGRESS. (NOTE: COST OF MEALS INCLUDED IN THE COST OF THE ROOM, NOT AN ITEMIZED CHARGE)
Date: Oct 15, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $2,141.10
source

Destination: ISRAEL
Sponsor: American Israel Education Foundation
Purpose: EDUCATION MISSION
Date: Mar 25, 2005 (6 days)
Expense: $8,458.32
source

Destination: NEW ORLEANS, LA
Sponsor: Democratic Leadership Council
Purpose: SENATOR CARPER PARTICIPATED AS A FEATURED SPEAKER AT THE DEMOCRATIC LEADERSHIP COUNCIL SPRING RETREAT
Date: Apr 29, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $433.13
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Thomas Carper

Sean Barney
Stephen Gardner
Hilary Jochmans
J Jonathan Jones
John Kilvington
Tom Lawler
Sheila Murphy
Tony Park
James Reilly
Margaret Simmons



American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.