American RadioWorks |
Josipa Roksa and Richard Arum, co-authors of Aspiring Adults Adrift. (Photo:  Social Science Research Council)

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can't find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
Josipa Roksa and Richard Arum, co-authors of Aspiring Adults Adrift. (Photo:  Social Science Research Council)

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can't find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Office of

Thomas Carper


Total cost of 51 office trips: $74,844.60


Trips by Thomas Carper
Total cost of congressperson's 12 trips: $21,220.27

Destination: LAS VEGAS, NV-PHILADELPHIA, PA
Sponsor: Edison Electric Institute
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT FOR EDISON ELECTRIC INSTITUTE CONFERENCE, ATTEND BROOKINGS INSTITUTE CONFERENCE
Date: Jan 9, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $651.81
source

Destination: MACKINAC ISLAND, MI
Sponsor: Democratic Leadership Council
Purpose: DLC RESCHEDULED SPRING MEETING
Date: Sep 12, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $1,604.63
source

Destination: BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS
Sponsor: American Bar Association
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT AT NATIONAL CLASS ACTION CLE PROGRAM (CONTINUING LEGAL EDUCATION) GOOD FAITH ESTIMATE FILED ON 11/3/03, DELAY IN GETTING ACTUAL REIMBURSEMENT AMOUNT FROM THE ABA
Date: Oct 3, 2003
Expense: $451.50
source

Destination: THE GREENBRIER, WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, WEST VIRGINIA
Sponsor: Business-Government Relations Council
Purpose: THE BUSINESS GOVERNMENT RELATIONS COUNCIL ANNUAL CONFERENCE, SENATOR CARPER SPOKE ON A PANEL REGARDING CLASS ACTION REFORM, WITH A NUMBER OF OTHER MEMBERS OF CONGRESS
Date: Oct 17, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $1,486.60
source

Destination: NEW YORK CITY, NY
Sponsor: Democratic Leadership Council
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN NATIONAL STAKEHOLDERS MEETINGS TO DISCUSS POLICY/MESSAGE STRATEGY FOR THE COMING YEAR
Date: Dec 11, 2003
Expense: $392.01
source

Destination: DETROIT, MICHIGAN
Sponsor: Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers Inc
Purpose: FACT FINDING MEETING IN DETROIT
Date: Jan 3, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,554.79
source

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: Securities Industry Association
Purpose: MEETINGS WITH HIGH LEVEL EXECUTIVES OF FINANCIAL SERVICES COMPANIES, ARRANGED BY SIA. NOTE: A PORTION OF THE TRAVEL EXPENSES INCLUDE 1/3 THE COST OF A SHARED PRIVATE CAR USED FOR TRANSPORTATION IN NYC
Date: Mar 18, 2004
Expense: $412.36
source

Destination: AMELIA ISLAND, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Democratic Leadership Council
Purpose: DLC SPRING RETREAT, SENATOR CARPER WAS A SPEAKER AT A BREAKFAST PANEL ON 3/27
Date: Mar 26, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,662.98
source

Destination: JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Railway Supply Institute
Purpose: SENATOR CARPER ADDRESSED THE 2004 RSI SPRING LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE
Date: Apr 14, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,971.04
source

Destination: WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, WV
Sponsor: Business-Government Relations Council
Purpose: ANNUAL MEETING, SENATOR CARPER ADDRESSED ATTENDEES REGARDING ISSUES FACING CONGRESS. (NOTE: COST OF MEALS INCLUDED IN THE COST OF THE ROOM, NOT AN ITEMIZED CHARGE)
Date: Oct 15, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $2,141.10
source

Destination: ISRAEL
Sponsor: American Israel Education Foundation
Purpose: EDUCATION MISSION
Date: Mar 25, 2005 (6 days)
Expense: $8,458.32
source

Destination: NEW ORLEANS, LA
Sponsor: Democratic Leadership Council
Purpose: SENATOR CARPER PARTICIPATED AS A FEATURED SPEAKER AT THE DEMOCRATIC LEADERSHIP COUNCIL SPRING RETREAT
Date: Apr 29, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $433.13
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Thomas Carper

Sean Barney
Stephen Gardner
Hilary Jochmans
J Jonathan Jones
John Kilvington
Tom Lawler
Sheila Murphy
Tony Park
James Reilly
Margaret Simmons



American RadioWorks |
Josipa Roksa and Richard Arum, co-authors of Aspiring Adults Adrift. (Photo:  Social Science Research Council)

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can't find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.