American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Office of

Eleanor Holmes Norton


Total cost of 19 office trips: $21,406.43


Trips by Eleanor Holmes Norton
Total cost of congressperson's 17 trips: $19,180.47

Destination: PHILADELPHIA, PA
Sponsor: Historical Society of US District Court Eastern District of Pennsylvania
Purpose: PARTICIPATING IN THE UNVEILING CEREMONY FOR CHIEF JUDGE LEON HIGGINBOTHAM, JR.'S PORTRAIT
Date: Oct 26, 2000
Expense: $242.00
source

Destination: ALBANY, GA
Sponsor: Albany State University
Purpose: GIVING THE 2000 FALL COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS AT ALBANY STATE UNIVERSITY
Date: Dec 8, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $689.00
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Sponsor: City University Television
Purpose: PARTICIPATED IN A PANEL DISCUSSION ON THE LEGACY OF JOHN LINDSAY.
Date: Jan 9, 2001
Expense: $228.75
source

Destination: THE GREENBRIER IN WHITE SULPHER SPRING, WV
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: 2001 BIPARTISAN CONGRESSIONAL RETREAT
Date: Mar 9, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $786.00
source

Destination: SAN JOSE, CA
Sponsor: AMERICAN AIRLINES/AT&T MICROSOFT
Purpose: TO ATTEND TECHNOLOGY PRESENTATIONS & TOUR COMPANY FACILITIES AS PART OF THE 2001 CBC RETREAT.
Date: Mar 15, 2001 (4 days)
Expense: $4,771.00
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Sponsor: American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and state affiliates
Purpose: MAIN SPEAKER AT THE RETIREMENT GALA FOR IRA GLASSER.
Date: Apr 27, 2001
Expense: $245.75
source

Destination: CAMBRIDGE, MA
Sponsor: American Bar Association
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE ON A PANEL DURING THE WOMEN LEADERSHIP SUMMIT.
Date: Apr 28, 2001
Expense: $121.50
source

Destination: PITTSBURG, PENNSYLVANIA
Sponsor: Chatham College
Purpose: TO DELIVER THE 2001 COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS & RECEIVE AN HONORARY DEGREE
Date: May 19, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $760.06
source

Destination: PALO ALTO, CA
Sponsor: Stanford University
Purpose: TO SPEAK DURING THEIR COMMORATION OF BLACK LIBERATIN MONTH.
Date: Feb 14, 2002 (6 days)
Expense: $1,025.25
source

Destination: NEW HAVEN, CT
Sponsor: Yale University
Purpose: TO DELIVER THE OPENING ADDRESS AT THE RACE, VALUES AND THE AMERICAN LEGAL PROCESS: A SCHOLAR WORKING CONFERENCE IN HONOR OF THE LEGACY OF THE HONORABLE A. LEON HIGGINBOTHAM, JR. DINNER.
Date: Feb 22, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $410.58
source

Destination: SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO
Sponsor: Congressional Black Caucus
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN THE 2003 CONGRESSIONAL TRI-CAUCUS RETREAT
Date: Oct 24, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,475.96
source

Destination: WASHINGTON NATIONAL AIRPORT TO NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Sponsor: Carib News Corporation
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN THE 8TH ANNUAL CARIBBEAN MULTI-NATIONAL BUSINESS CONFERENCE
Date: Nov 7, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,518.50
source

Destination: ATLANTA, GEORGIA
Sponsor: Gate City Bar Association
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT THE GATE CITY BAR ASSOCIATION'S 2003 HALL OF FAME DINNER
Date: Nov 12, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,969.00
source

Destination: ATHENS, OHIO-WILBERFORCE, OHIO-YELLOW SPRINGS, OHIO
Sponsor: Antioch College Ohio
Purpose: CHATTERJEE PEACE LECTURE KEYNOTE SPEAKER AND CAMPUS SPEAKER
Date: Feb 17, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $963.15
source

Destination: SAN FRANCISCO, CA-LOS ANGELES, CA
Sponsor: Equal Rights Advocates
Purpose: EQUAL RIGHTS ADVOCATES 30TH ANNIVERSARY LUNCHEON KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Date: Jun 3, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $2,876.00
source

Destination: WASHINGTON, DC TO QUEENSTOWN, MD
Sponsor: Public Governance Institute
Purpose: TO EXAMINE ISSUES RELEVANT TO THE HOMELAND SECURITY COMMITTEE'S RESPONSIBILITIES, AND IN THE PROCESS IMPROVE THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT OF THE COMMITTEE AND ITS MEMBERS
Date: Mar 7, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $404.00
source

Destination: HARTFORD, CO
Sponsor: Yale University
Purpose: YALE UNIVERSITY CLASS DAY SPEAKER
Date: May 21, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $693.97
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Eleanor Holmes Norton

Julia Hudson
Aaron Ward



American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.