American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

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American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

Back to The Data

Office of

Michael Enzi


Total cost of 55 office trips: $96,640.96


Trips by Michael Enzi
Total cost of congressperson's 6 trips: $28,599.92

Destination: INDIAN WELLS, CALIFORNIA
Sponsor: Fay Improvement Company
Purpose: SPEECHES
Date: Nov 8, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $2,744.00
source

Destination: CORAL GABLES, FLORIDA
Sponsor: American Bankers Association
Purpose: CONVENTION SPEAKER
Date: Feb 21, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $5,935.00
source

Destination: IRELAND
Sponsor: US-Ireland Alliance
Purpose: TRIP TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE IRISH ECONOMY AND TO DISCUSS U.S. BUSINESSES AND THEIR IMPACT ON THE IRISH ECONOMY
Date: May 25, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $8,056.00
source

Destination: MUNICH, GERMANY
Sponsor: German Marshall Fund of the United States
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Apr 12, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $8,338.90
source

Destination: CAPE COD, MASSACHUSSETTS
Sponsor: Invest to Compete Alliance
Purpose: TO ATTEND THE "INVEST TO COMPETE ALLIANCE" CONFERENCE
Date: Jul 3, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $2,635.18
source

Destination: KETCHIKAN, ALASKA
Sponsor: Waterfall Committee
Purpose: SPEAKER
Date: Aug 13, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $890.84
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Michael Enzi

Kathryn Barr
Candice Cotton
Gregory Dean
Michelle Dirst
Christine Dodd
Andrew Emrich
Allen Fleming
Raissa Geary
Benjamin Ling
Flip Mcconnaughey
Katherine Mcguire
Stephen Northrup
Joel Oswald
Wendy Rasmussen Gnehm
Dallas Scholes
Elizabeth Smith
John Snowden
Michael Thompson
Christopher Tomassi



American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.