American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Office of

Thomas Bliley


Total cost of 88 office trips: $116,793.72


Trips by Thomas Bliley
Total cost of congressperson's 3 trips: $33,668.58

Destination: LAS VEGAS, NV
Sponsor: Consumer Electronics Association
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Jan 6, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $2,025.70
source

Destination: INTERNET PRIVACY SUMMIT
Sponsor: Chamber of Commerce for the USA
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL-LEGISLATIVE ISSUES ON ONLINE PRIVACY
Date: May 19, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $472.12
source

Destination: LONDON, ENGLAND
Sponsor: Brown & Williamson Tobacco
Purpose: TOUR/SPEAK TO SENIOR MANAGEMENT OF BRITISH AMERICAN TOBACCO; MEET WITH CEO OF BRITISH TRADE INTERNATIONAL
Date: Jul 6, 2000 (4 days)
Expense: $31,170.76
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Thomas Bliley

Jason Bentley
Ramsen Betfarhad
Dwight Cates
David Cavicke
Kevin Cook
Brent Del Monte
James Derderian
Amy Droskoski
Miriam Erickson
Dennis Fitzgibbons
Dick Frandsen
Carrie Gavorga
Tom Giles
Robert Gordon
Curry Hagerty
Hugh Halpern
Curry Haperty
Patricia Higgins
Joseph Kelliher
Nandan Kenkeremath
Rick Kessler
Chris Knauer
Jason Lee
Andy Levin
Justin Lilley
Robert Meyers
John Monthei
Michael O'rielly
Linda Rich
Amii Sachdev
Paul Scolese
Sue Sheridan
Robert Simison
Joseph Stanko
Alison Taylor
Bridgett Taylor
Cathy Vanway
Lori Wall
Consuela Washington



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.