American RadioWorks |
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 09.02.14

    Teachers embrace the Common Core

    Teachers in Reno, Nevada, were skeptical of the Common Core at first. But they have embraced the new standards as a way to bring better education to students who are struggling in school -- and to kids who are ahead.
  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.

American RadioWorks |
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 09.02.14

    Teachers embrace the Common Core

    Teachers in Reno, Nevada, were skeptical of the Common Core at first. But they have embraced the new standards as a way to bring better education to students who are struggling in school -- and to kids who are ahead.
  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.

Back to The Data

Office of

Lois Capps


Total cost of 26 office trips: $43,881.56


Trips by Lois Capps
Total cost of congressperson's 17 trips: $35,683.85

Destination: HYDERABAD-BANGALORE
Sponsor: Confederation of Indian Industry
Purpose: FACT FINDING ON US-INDIA RELATIONS AND BILATERAL TRADE
Date: Jan 6, 2001 (9 days)
Expense: $8,706.00
source

Destination: GREENBRIER
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: STRENGTHEN BIPARTISANSHIP IN THE HOUSE
Date: Mar 9, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $786.00
source

Destination: DC-SEATTLE-SANTA BARBARA
Sponsor: PACIFIC LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY
Purpose: COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS
Date: May 26, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $1,460.50
source

Destination: WASHINGTON, DC - MINNEAPOLIS, MN - SANTA BARBARA, CA
Sponsor: MT OLIVET LUTHERAN CHURCH
Purpose: SPEECH ABOUT CURRENT ISSUES BEFORE CONGRESS
Date: Feb 28, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $1,907.38
source

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE AND THE HUMPTY DUMPTY INSTITUTE
Purpose: FACTFINDING ABOUT U.S. CAPITAL MARKETS AND INT'L DEVELOPMENT ISSUES
Date: Apr 15, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $851.91
source

Destination: SAN FRANCISCO, CA - SANTA BARBARA, CA
Sponsor: PACIFIC LUTHERAN THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY
Purpose: RECEIPT OF HONORARY DEGREE AND SPEECH
Date: Sep 21, 2002
Expense: $277.00
source

Destination: SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA
Sponsor: Faith & Politics Institute
Purpose: PRAYER, POLITICS, AND RECONCILIATION RETREAT
Date: Jan 10, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $398.00
source

Destination: THE GREENBRIER
Sponsor: Public Governance Institute
Purpose: THE CONGRESSIONAL RETREAT 2003
Date: Feb 28, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $888.00
source

Destination: LOS ANGELES
Sponsor: University of California at Los Angeles
Purpose: COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS
Date: Jun 13, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $288.00
source

Destination: POTOMAC, MARYLAND
Sponsor: Faith & Politics Institute
Purpose: RETREAT AND DISCUSSION WITH THICH NHAT HANH
Date: Sep 12, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $221.00
source

Destination: DES MOINES, IA-GENEVA, SWITZERLAND-SANTA BARBARA, CA
Sponsor: Swiss Foundation for World Affairs
Purpose: OBSERVE THE SIGNING OF THE "GENEVA ACCORD" PEACE AGREEMENT BETWEEN ISRAELI AND PALESTINIAN LEADERS. MEET WITH OFFICIALS FROM OTHER GOVERNMENTS CONCERNING U.S. ROLE IN MIDDLE EAST PEACEMAKING
Date: Nov 30, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $7,483.87
source

Destination: SANTA BARBARA-PALM SPRINGS-WASHINGTON, DC
Sponsor: Public Governance Institute
Purpose: BI-PARTISAN CALIFORNIA DELEGATION RETREAT
Date: Dec 5, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $977.69
source

Destination: ISRAEL
Sponsor: Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
Purpose: FACT FINDING IN ISRAEL AND THE WEST BANK
Date: Jan 9, 2004 (7 days)
Expense: $5,078.00
source

Destination: SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA
Sponsor: Faith & Politics Institute
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL RETREAT
Date: Jan 23, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $105.50
source

Destination: NEW HAVEN, CT
Sponsor: Yale University
Purpose: SPEECH ON NURSING AND PUBLIC POLICY
Date: Jun 4, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,032.00
source

Destination: PORTLAND, OR-FAIRBANKS, AK-ARCTIC VILLAGE, ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE-KAKTOVIK-FAIRBANKS-SANTA BARBARA, CA
Sponsor: ALASKA COALITION, ALASKA WILDERNESS LEAGUE, EARTHJUSTICE, NATURAL RESOURCES DEFENSE COUNCIL, SIERRA CLUB, THE WILDERNESS SOCIETY, WORLD WILDLIFE FUND
Purpose: FACT-FINDING TRIP ON ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE OIL DRILLING, ENERGY, AND WILDERNESS ISSUES
Date: Jun 27, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $2,506.00
source

Destination: ISRAEL AND PALESTINE
Sponsor: National Democratic Institute
Purpose: MONITORING THE PALESTINIAN PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION
Date: Jan 4, 2005 (7 days)
Expense: $2,717.00
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Lois Capps

Clare Dowling
Randolph Harrison
Jonathan Levenshus
Brigid O'brien
Jeremy Rabinovitz
Jeremy Tittle



American RadioWorks |
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 09.02.14

    Teachers embrace the Common Core

    Teachers in Reno, Nevada, were skeptical of the Common Core at first. But they have embraced the new standards as a way to bring better education to students who are struggling in school -- and to kids who are ahead.
  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.