American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Office of

Jim Jeffords


Total cost of 87 office trips: $120,271.82


Trips by Jim Jeffords
Total cost of congressperson's 15 trips: $43,143.78

Destination: ORLANDO, FL
Sponsor: EDUCATIONAL FINANCE GROUP
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER ON HIGHER EDUCATION LENDING ISSUES
Date: Feb 4, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $1,101.03
source

Destination: ST. PETERSBURG, FL
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION
Date: Feb 16, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $4,214.00
source

Destination: FLORENCE, ITALY
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON THE CONVERGENCE OF U.S. NATIONAL SECURITY AND THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT
Date: May 29, 2001 (5 days)
Expense: $8,465.60
source

Destination: LONG BEACH, CA
Sponsor: LONG BEACH EDUCATION PARTNERSHIP SEAMLESS EDUCATION
Purpose: TO ATTEND CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION
Date: Jun 21, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $3,202.00
source

Destination: LAKE TAHOE, NV
Sponsor: Alliance of Western Milk Producers
Purpose: TO ATTEND DAIRY CONFERENCE
Date: Jun 24, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $204.00
source

Destination: QUEENSTOWN, MD
Sponsor: GLOBE USA
Purpose: CONFERENCE ON CLEAN TECHNOLOGIES AND ALTERNATIVE ENERGY AS WAYS OF REDUCING GAS EMISSIONS AND ADDRESSING GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE
Date: Jul 13, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $325.00
source

Destination: WEST PALM BEACH, FL
Sponsor: Forum Club of the Palm Beaches Inc
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Date: Feb 21, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $2,354.00
source

Destination: CHICAGO, IL
Sponsor: Transportation Research Board
Purpose: SPEECH TO TRANSPORTATION GROUP
Date: Oct 27, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $1,024.50
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Sponsor: Harlem Business Alliance
Purpose: ATTEND AND SPEAK AT "PROFILES IN COURAGE" AWARDS DINNER
Date: Dec 6, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $1,334.00
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Sponsor: NEW YORK SOCIETY FOR ETHICAL CULTURE
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT ANNUAL AWARDS CEREMONY
Date: Mar 8, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $681.17
source

Destination: BOSTON, MA
Sponsor: New England Association of Schools and Colleges
Purpose: TO ATTEND/SPEAK AT ANNUAL MEETING AND CONFERENCE
Date: Dec 4, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $895.28
source

Destination: AVENTURA, FL
Sponsor: Harvard University
Purpose: ATTEND JFK SCHOOL OF GOVERNMENT/THE COMMONWEALTH FUND BIPARTISAN CONGRESSIONAL HEALTH POLICY CONFERENCE
Date: Jan 15, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $3,382.90
source

Destination: BARCELONA, SPAIN
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON POLITICAL ISLAM
Date: May 23, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $8,168.50
source

Destination: CANCUN, MEXICO
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION REFORM
Date: Feb 22, 2005 (5 days)
Expense: $5,341.80
source

Destination: CUBA
Sponsor: Center for International Policy
Purpose: TO ENCOURAGE GREATER TRADE WITH THE STATE OF VERMONT AND TO INVESTIGATE THE CURRENT POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC STATUS OF CUBA
Date: Apr 29, 2005 (5 days)
Expense: $2,450.00
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Jim Jeffords

Kimberly Barnes-O'connor
Edward Barron
Kathleen Black
Geoffrey Brown
Ken Connolly
Toby Croll
Jo-Ellen Darcy
Diane Derby
Sean Donohue
Ryan Erenhouse
Scott Giles
Laurie Heim
Shannon Heyck-Williams
Mary Katherine Ishee
Sherry Kaiman
Justin King
William Kurtz
Andrew Meyer
Christopher Miller
Kim Monk
Catharine Ransom
Mary Frances Repko
Bryan Richardson
Arthur Rosenfeld
Susan Russ
Eric Silva
Jennifer Anne Smulson
Jeffrey Squires
Joshua Stahl
Erik Steavens
Alison Taylor
Cameron Taylor
Kevin Veller
Mitch Warren
Margaret Wetherald
Malcolm Woolf



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.