American RadioWorks |
Josipa Roksa and Richard Arum, co-authors of Aspiring Adults Adrift. (Photo:  Social Science Research Council)

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can't find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
Josipa Roksa and Richard Arum, co-authors of Aspiring Adults Adrift. (Photo:  Social Science Research Council)

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can't find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Office of

Chris Cannon


Total cost of 22 office trips: $46,254.76


Trips by Chris Cannon
Total cost of congressperson's 4 trips: $5,133.59

Destination: LAS VEGAS
Sponsor: Western Watch Foundation
Purpose: PUBLIC LANDS CONFERENCE
Date: Jun 28, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $2,683.72
source

Destination: SLC, UT-SEATTLE, WA
Sponsor: NORTHWEST COMMISSION ON COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER FOR THE NORTHWEST COMMISSION ON COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES' 2005 ANNUAL CONFERENCE
Date: Feb 24, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $280.33
source

Destination: SEATTLE, WA-MORELIA, MEXICO-SALT LAKE CITY, UT
Sponsor: University of California at Berkeley
Purpose: U.S.-MEXICO FUTURES FORUM MEETING. THE FUTURES FORUM IS AN UNIQUE NETWORK OF LEADING POLITICAL AND SOCIAL ACTORS, WHO THINK ABOUT THE ISSUES FACING BOTH COUNTRIES
Date: Feb 25, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,844.54
source

Destination: SLC; SAN DIEGO, CA; WASHINGTON, D.C.
Sponsor: Center for the New West
Purpose: PARTICIPATED IN ROUNDTABLE & CONFERENCE
Date: Apr 3, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $325.00
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Chris Cannon

Thad Bingel
Anne Cannon
Jenny Davis
Christopher Mackay
Corey Norman
Jane Rose
David Safavian
Todd Thorpe



American RadioWorks |
Josipa Roksa and Richard Arum, co-authors of Aspiring Adults Adrift. (Photo:  Social Science Research Council)

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can't find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.