American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Office of

Eddie Bernice Johnson


Total cost of 39 office trips: $73,637.63


Trips by Eddie Bernice Johnson
Total cost of congressperson's 33 trips: $61,847.72

Destination: NEW YORK
Sponsor: United Negro College Fund
Purpose: MEMBER WAS A GUEST OF THE CEO/PRES. OF UNCF
Date: Mar 9, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $2,225.75
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Sponsor: NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE, BELL ATLANTIC, THE HUMPTY DUMPTY INSTITUTE
Purpose: MARKETS RESEARCH & FACT-FINDING MISSION
Date: Jun 15, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $1,141.09
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Carib News Corporation
Purpose: CBC CARIBBEAN BUSINESS CONFERENCE
Date: Nov 9, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $2,340.30
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Consumer Electronics Association
Purpose: CEA LEADERS IN TECHNOLOGY RECEPTION & DINNER AND 2001 INT'L. CONSUMER ELECTRONIC SHOW AND CONFERENCE - MEMBER WAS ONE OF THE SPEAKERS
Date: Jan 6, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $1,572.72
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Time Warner
Purpose: TRUMPET AWARDS AND DINNER
Date: Jan 8, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $472.22
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Congressional Black Caucus
Purpose: 2001 DEMOCRATIC CAUCUS ISSUES CONFERENCE AT NEMACOLIN WOODLANDS IN FARMINGTON, PA
Date: Feb 3, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $400.00
source

Destination: SCOTTSDALE, AZ
Sponsor: Association of American Railroads
Purpose: ONE OF THE GUEST SPEAKERS AT CONFERENCE IN SCOTSDALE, AZ
Date: Feb 23, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $1,825.00
source

Destination: ATLANTA, GA
Sponsor: Pharmaceutical Research & Manufacturers of America (PHRMA)
Purpose: SPEAKER AT THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN STATE LEGISLATORS CONF. IN ATLANTA, GA
Date: Mar 2, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $1,448.30
source

Destination: SAVANNAH, GA
Sponsor: NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF BLACK MAYORS
Purpose: NAT'L. CONF. OF BLACK MAYORS RECEIVE THE PRESIDENT'S AWARD
Date: Mar 8, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $989.00
source

Destination:
Sponsor: AT&T, MICROSOFT & AMERICAN AIRLINES
Purpose: HI-TECH TOUR FOR CBC HOSTED BY REP. JOHNSON
Date: Mar 16, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $9,425.00
source

Destination:
Sponsor: NAACP and affiliates
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER FOR FREEDOM FUND DINNER
Date: Mar 23, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $300.75
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Information Technology Industry Council
Purpose: CBC HIGH TECH SUMMIT
Date: Apr 20, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $1,043.55
source

Destination: NEW ORLEANS, LA
Sponsor: Congressional Black Caucus
Purpose: BOARD MEMBER ATTENDANCE/PARTICIPATION
Date: Jun 1, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $132.00
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Congressional Black Caucus
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL - TRADE POLICY CONFERENCE
Date: Jun 8, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $816.00
source

Destination:
Sponsor: American Petroleum Institute
Purpose: CBC ENERGY SUMMIT
Date: Jun 29, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $2,733.25
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Democratic National Committee
Purpose: SUMMER EXEC. CONFE. MTG.
Date: Jun 30, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $2,140.35
source

Destination: NEW ORLEANS
Sponsor: Recording Industry Association of America
Purpose: POLICY LUNCHEON/LUNCHEON HONORING CBC MEMBERS ISSUES DISCUSSED INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS; MUSIC INDUSTRY; GENERAL ISSUE
Date: Jul 5, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $377.28
source

Destination:
Sponsor: NAACP and affiliates
Purpose: PARTICIPATE AS PANELIST AT 92ND ANNUAL CONVENTION
Date: Jul 9, 2001
Expense: $1,044.25
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Chamber of Commerce for the USA
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN PRIVACY RETREAT AS A PANELIST
Date: Jul 12, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $894.33
source

Destination:
Sponsor: NISSAN CORP
Purpose: NISSAN EDUCATION TESTING SERVICE EVENT AT N.C. A&T UNIV IN GREENSBORO
Date: Jul 15, 2001
Expense: $681.50
source

Destination: GRENADA
Sponsor: Carib News Corporation
Purpose: MULTI NATIONAL BUS. CONF.
Date: Oct 18, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $2,460.00
source

Destination: LEESBURG, VA
Sponsor: Congressional Black Caucus
Purpose: TRI-CAUCUS RETREAT AT LANSDOWNE RESORT IN LEESBURG, VA
Date: Apr 19, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $658.81
source

Destination: LAS VEGAS
Sponsor: Delta Sigma Theta Sorority
Purpose: SPEAK AT LUNCHEON
Date: May 17, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $960.00
source

Destination: HOUSTON, TX
Sponsor: NAACP and affiliates
Purpose: SPEAK AT ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON SUN., JULY 7TH IN HOUSTON, TX
Date: Jul 6, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $315.50
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Faith & Politics Institute
Purpose: CIVIL RIGHTS PILGRIMAGE TO ALABAMA
Date: Mar 7, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $913.00
source

Destination: SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO
Sponsor: Congressional Black Caucus
Purpose: TRI-CAUCUS RETREAT IN SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO
Date: Oct 23, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $2,980.60
source

Destination: NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Sponsor: Carib News Corporation
Purpose: 8TH ANNUAL CARIBBEAN MULTI-NATIONAL BUSINESS CONFERENCE
Date: Nov 6, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $1,050.00
source

Destination: TULSA, OK
Sponsor: John Edwards Campaign
Purpose: CAMPAIGN, RELATED
Date: Jan 24, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $214.80
source

Destination: NC-CANCUN, MEXICO-HAVANA, CUBA, MEXICO-NC
Sponsor: THE INTERRELIGIOUS FOUNDATION FOR COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS/THE CHRISTOPHER REGARD TO FOUND
Purpose: MET WITH GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS, VISIT CONSTITUENTS AT THE LATIN AMERICAN MEDICAL SCHOOL
Date: Mar 12, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,350.73
source

Destination: DALLAS RIO DE JANEIRO-SAO PAULO-BRASILIA-SALVADOR-DC
Sponsor: Brazil-US Business Council
Purpose: FACILITATE BUSINESS LEADERS FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN COMPANIES AS WELL AS AFRO-BRAZILIAN COMPANIES
Date: Apr 11, 2004 (7 days)
Expense: $9,289.37
source

Destination: DALLAS, ST. KITTS, BAHAMAS
Sponsor: Carib News Corporation
Purpose: BRING TOGETHER AFRICAN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN AMERICAN BUSINESS/CIVIC LEADERS WITH MEMBERS OF CONGRESS
Date: Nov 4, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $1,005.00
source

Destination: AUSTIN, TEXAS-ISTANBUL AND ANKARA TURKEY AND NORTHERN CYPRUS
Sponsor: United States Association of Former Members of Congress
Purpose: TO LEARN ABOUT THE CURRENT STATE OF U.S.-TURKISH RELATIONS AND TO MEET WITH TURKISH PARLIAMENTARIANS TO DISCUSS AREAS OF MUTUAL CONCERN: THE WAR ON TERRORISM, THE MIDEAST PEACE PROCESS AND A SETTLEMENT FOR THE DIVIDED ISLAND OF CYPRUS
Date: May 28, 2005 (6 days)
Expense: $7,091.98
source

Destination: PHILADELPHIA-CANCON-HAVANA-MIAMI
Sponsor: Christopher Reynolds Foundation
Purpose: EXPLORE FIRST-HAND THE ISSUES CURRENTLY FACING THE PEOPLE OF CUBA. AN OPPORTUNITY TO FASTER A MORE PRAGMATIC APPROACH TOWARDS DEALING WITH THE CUBAN GOVERNMENT AND FINDING CONSTRUCTIVE SOLUTIONS TO US/CUBA POLICY CONCERNS
Date: Jul 6, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $1,555.29
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Eddie Bernice Johnson

Morat Bokcigdem
Joye Purser
Edlecia Sherrod
Jennifer Stewart
John Tustin



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.