American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

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    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
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  • 08.27.15

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    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball

Back to The Data

Office of

Larry Combest


Total cost of 219 office trips: $228,448.05


Trips by Larry Combest
Total cost of congressperson's 8 trips: $14,134.58

Destination: WYE RIVER CONFERENCE CENTER, QUEENSTOWN, MARYLAND
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: BIPARTISAN AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE RETREAT
Date: Jan 28, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $482.00
source

Destination: CHARLESTON, SC
Sponsor: Cotton Warehouse Association of America
Purpose: ADDRESS THEIR ANNUAL MEETING
Date: Jun 23, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $822.59
source

Destination: WASHINGTON DC-STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, CO
Sponsor: American Sugar Alliance
Purpose: TALK ABOUT FARM LEGISLATION
Date: Aug 6, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $1,929.37
source

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: American Horse Council
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Oct 26, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $2,121.42
source

Destination: ST. LOUIS, MO
Sponsor: American Farm Bureau Federation and affiliates
Purpose: KEYNOTE ADDRESS TO 2001 ANNUAL MEETING
Date: Dec 2, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $602.02
source

Destination: DENVER, WASHINGTON
Sponsor: National Cotton Council
Purpose: SPEAK TO NCC ANNUAL MEETING
Date: Feb 8, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $4,042.18
source

Destination: FT. WORTH, TX
Sponsor: Texas Independent Ginners Association
Purpose: ADDRESS GENERAL SESSION AND PRESIDENT'S DINNER
Date: Mar 11, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $1,058.62
source

Destination: TAMPA, FL
Sponsor: National Cotton Council
Purpose: ADDRESS NATIONAL MEETING ON AGRICULTURE ISSUES
Date: Feb 9, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $3,076.38
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Larry Combest

Andy Baker
Shanna Brown
Chip Carley
Christy Cromley
Christopher D'arcy
Bryan Daniel
Dawn Deberry
Dave Ebersole
Kathleen Elder
Danelle Farmer
Ryan Flynn
Claire Folbre
Lynn Gallagher
Brent Gattis
John Goldberg
Jeff Harrison
Stephen Haterius
Virginia Haterius
John Haugen
Ryan Henry
Vernie Hubert
Craig Jagger
Andrew Johnson
Lance Kotschwar
Kevin Kramp
Rob Lehman
Alan Mackey
Sarah Matz
Russell Middleton
Hunter Moorhead
William O'conner
Ryan O'neal
Elizabeth Parker
John Riley
Kathryn Scott
Tom Sell
Christy Seyfert
Anne Simmons
Pelhan Straughn
David Tenny
Dave Terry
Richard Thomson
Jason Vaillancourt
Walter Vinson
Ryan Weston
Keith Williams
Greg Zerzan



American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball