American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Office of

Lindsey Graham


Total cost of 60 office trips: $139,992.43


Trips by Lindsey Graham
Total cost of congressperson's 13 trips: $22,461.19

Destination: AUGUSTA, GEORGIA
Sponsor: Corning Inc
Purpose: CORNING PUBLIC POLICY CONFERENCE
Date: Mar 8, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $841.00
source

Destination: SEA ISLAND, GEORGIA
Sponsor: South Carolina Manufacturers Alliance
Purpose: POLICY BRIEFING AND SPEECH TO ANNUAL MEETING OF SC. MANUFACTURING ALLIANCE
Date: May 16, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $1,071.00
source

Destination: ALBANY, GA
Sponsor: QUAIL UNLIMITED
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Feb 1, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $1,119.00
source

Destination: LOS ANGELES, CA
Sponsor: Motion Picture Association of America
Purpose: COPYRIGHT MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS BRIEFING
Date: Feb 18, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $839.75
source

Destination: COLOMBIA, SC TO DULLES
Sponsor: General Electric Co
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Mar 1, 2003
Expense: $601.50
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Sponsor: Business Roundtable
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: May 1, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $736.94
source

Destination: LAGUARDIA, NY TO COLUMBIA, SC
Sponsor: Walt Disney Co
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: May 3, 2003
Expense: $828.00
source

Destination: ORLANDO, FLORIDA
Sponsor: PATHOLOGY SERVICES ASSOCIATES
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Jul 18, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $1,043.00
source

Destination: ROME, ITALY
Sponsor: Nuclear Energy Institute
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP TO NUCLEAR FACILITIES
Date: Aug 2, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $10,638.00
source

Destination: HONOLULU, HAWAII
Sponsor: Sony Corporation
Purpose: KEYNOTE, SONY OPEN FORUM 2005 "ERA OF CONVERGENCE: RE-EXAMINING ITS THREATS AND OPPORTUNITIES."
Date: Jan 10, 2005 (6 days)
Expense: $3,793.00
source

Destination: LA QUINTA, CALIFORNIA
Sponsor: Association of Trial Lawyers of America and affiliates
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER, AMERICAN TRIAL LAWYERS ASSOCIATION 2005 WINTER CONVENTION
Date: Jan 30, 2005
Expense: $260.00
source

Destination: JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Headers Project
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE REGARDING U.S./MUSLIM RELATIONS
Date: Feb 25, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $200.00
source

Destination: NEW ORLEANS, LA
Sponsor: SOUTHEAST AMERICAN BOARD OF TRIAL ADVOCATES
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER, SOUTHEAST ABOTA NATIONAL CONVENTION
Date: Apr 7, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $490.00
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Lindsey Graham

Denise Bauld
Laura Bauld
Ed Bonapfel
Ellen Bradley
Thomas Burris
Michael Conschafter
Charles Durkin
Jessica Efird
Stephen Flippin
Aleix Jarvis
Stephanie Kaufmann
Andrew King
Jennifer Olson
Richard Perry
Matthew Rimkunas
Rene Tewkesbury



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.