American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

Back to The Data

Office of

Paul Kanjorski


Total cost of 37 office trips: $53,693.86


Trips by Paul Kanjorski
Total cost of congressperson's 13 trips: $29,838.13

Destination: NIAGARA FALLS, NY
Sponsor: United States Association of Former Members of Congress
Purpose: 17TH ANNUAL CONGRESS-BUNDESTAG SEMINAR
Date: Apr 17, 2000 (4 days)
Expense: $1,835.50
source

Destination: BURLINGTON, VERMONT
Sponsor: Vermont Credit Union League
Purpose: GUEST PANELIST AT VCUL'S ANNUAL MEETING AND CONVENTION
Date: May 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $933.16
source

Destination: WASHINGTON, DC TO BERLIN, GERMANY TO USEDOM, GERMANY TO VENICE, ITALY
Sponsor: United States Association of Former Members of Congress
Purpose: TO ATTEND 18TH ANNUAL CONGRESS BUNDESTAG SEMINAR
Date: Apr 7, 2001 (6 days)
Expense: $5,104.91
source

Destination: ROME, ITALY TO VIBO VALENTIA, ITALY TO WASHINGTON, D.C
Sponsor: THE NATIONAL ITALIAN AMERICAN FOUNDATION (AIRFARE AND ROME) AND REGION OF CALABRIA (VISIT TO CALABRIA)
Purpose: EXCHANGE OF POLITICAL AND LEGISLATIVE IDEAS BETWEEN ITALIAN OFFICIALS AND MEMBERS OF CONGRESS
Date: Apr 17, 2001 (6 days)
Expense: $5,152.00
source

Destination: WASHINGTON, DC TO UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH
Sponsor: University of Pittsburgh
Purpose: PARTICIPATION IN POLICY CONFERENCE ON INTERNATIONAL ASPECTS OF E-GOVERNMENT
Date: Jun 24, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $99.18
source

Destination: TO & FROM BOCA RESORT & CLUB - THE PALMS, MIAMI BEACH, FLA
Sponsor: Chicago Mercantile Exchange
Purpose: SPEECH TO FUTURE INDUSTRY ASSOC'S CONFERENCE
Date: Mar 16, 2002
Expense: $250.16
source

Destination: MIAMI TO WILLAS-BARRE, PA (ON TO KEY BISCAYNE)
Sponsor: NASDAQ
Purpose: PARTICIPATING IN NASDAQ LEADERSHIP SUMMIT-SAT ON PANEL WITH OTHER GOVT. OFFICIALS AND BUSINESS LEADERS RE: WAYS TO STIMULATE U.S. ECONOMY
Date: Mar 28, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $8,049.84
source

Destination: CHICAGO, IL
Sponsor: CHICAGO BOARD OPTIONS EXCHANGE, CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE AND CHICAGO MERCANTILE EXCHANGE
Purpose: TOURS OF ALL THREE FACILITIES
Date: Oct 26, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,794.49
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Sponsor: New York Stock Exchange
Purpose: RING OPENING BELL AT NYSE AND TOUR TRADING FLOOR
Date: Nov 11, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $559.53
source

Destination: New York City, NY
Sponsor: New York Stock Exchange
Purpose: To learn more about the Stock Exchange and their issues before Congress and the SEC, including Reg NMS
Date: Mar 7, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $1,047.06
source

Destination: Orlanda,FL;Miami, FL
Sponsor: National Association of Realtors
Purpose: Participating as a panelist at National Associaton of Realtors Conference in Miami
Date: Mar 18, 2005 (10 days)
Expense: $3,586.76
source

Destination: New York City, NY
Sponsor: Bond Market Association
Purpose: To address the Executive Committee of the Bond Market Association re: pending legislation
Date: May 9, 2005
Expense: $541.94
source

Destination: New York City, NY
Sponsor: New York Stock Exchange
Purpose: Briefings by and discussions with senior NYSE executives on current issues affecting the capital markets
Date: Sep 11, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $883.60
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Paul Kanjorski

Sharla Barklind
Karen Feather
Todd Harper
Dylan Jones
Kathryn Mcmahon



American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.