American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Office of

Paul Kanjorski


Total cost of 37 office trips: $53,693.86


Trips by Paul Kanjorski
Total cost of congressperson's 13 trips: $29,838.13

Destination: NIAGARA FALLS, NY
Sponsor: United States Association of Former Members of Congress
Purpose: 17TH ANNUAL CONGRESS-BUNDESTAG SEMINAR
Date: Apr 17, 2000 (4 days)
Expense: $1,835.50
source

Destination: BURLINGTON, VERMONT
Sponsor: Vermont Credit Union League
Purpose: GUEST PANELIST AT VCUL'S ANNUAL MEETING AND CONVENTION
Date: May 5, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $933.16
source

Destination: WASHINGTON, DC TO BERLIN, GERMANY TO USEDOM, GERMANY TO VENICE, ITALY
Sponsor: United States Association of Former Members of Congress
Purpose: TO ATTEND 18TH ANNUAL CONGRESS BUNDESTAG SEMINAR
Date: Apr 7, 2001 (6 days)
Expense: $5,104.91
source

Destination: ROME, ITALY TO VIBO VALENTIA, ITALY TO WASHINGTON, D.C
Sponsor: THE NATIONAL ITALIAN AMERICAN FOUNDATION (AIRFARE AND ROME) AND REGION OF CALABRIA (VISIT TO CALABRIA)
Purpose: EXCHANGE OF POLITICAL AND LEGISLATIVE IDEAS BETWEEN ITALIAN OFFICIALS AND MEMBERS OF CONGRESS
Date: Apr 17, 2001 (6 days)
Expense: $5,152.00
source

Destination: WASHINGTON, DC TO UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH
Sponsor: University of Pittsburgh
Purpose: PARTICIPATION IN POLICY CONFERENCE ON INTERNATIONAL ASPECTS OF E-GOVERNMENT
Date: Jun 24, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $99.18
source

Destination: TO & FROM BOCA RESORT & CLUB - THE PALMS, MIAMI BEACH, FLA
Sponsor: Chicago Mercantile Exchange
Purpose: SPEECH TO FUTURE INDUSTRY ASSOC'S CONFERENCE
Date: Mar 16, 2002
Expense: $250.16
source

Destination: MIAMI TO WILLAS-BARRE, PA (ON TO KEY BISCAYNE)
Sponsor: NASDAQ
Purpose: PARTICIPATING IN NASDAQ LEADERSHIP SUMMIT-SAT ON PANEL WITH OTHER GOVT. OFFICIALS AND BUSINESS LEADERS RE: WAYS TO STIMULATE U.S. ECONOMY
Date: Mar 28, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $8,049.84
source

Destination: CHICAGO, IL
Sponsor: CHICAGO BOARD OPTIONS EXCHANGE, CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE AND CHICAGO MERCANTILE EXCHANGE
Purpose: TOURS OF ALL THREE FACILITIES
Date: Oct 26, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,794.49
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Sponsor: New York Stock Exchange
Purpose: RING OPENING BELL AT NYSE AND TOUR TRADING FLOOR
Date: Nov 11, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $559.53
source

Destination: New York City, NY
Sponsor: New York Stock Exchange
Purpose: To learn more about the Stock Exchange and their issues before Congress and the SEC, including Reg NMS
Date: Mar 7, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $1,047.06
source

Destination: Orlanda,FL;Miami, FL
Sponsor: National Association of Realtors
Purpose: Participating as a panelist at National Associaton of Realtors Conference in Miami
Date: Mar 18, 2005 (10 days)
Expense: $3,586.76
source

Destination: New York City, NY
Sponsor: Bond Market Association
Purpose: To address the Executive Committee of the Bond Market Association re: pending legislation
Date: May 9, 2005
Expense: $541.94
source

Destination: New York City, NY
Sponsor: New York Stock Exchange
Purpose: Briefings by and discussions with senior NYSE executives on current issues affecting the capital markets
Date: Sep 11, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $883.60
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Paul Kanjorski

Sharla Barklind
Karen Feather
Todd Harper
Dylan Jones
Kathryn Mcmahon



American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.