American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Office of

Gordon Smith


Total cost of 88 office trips: $171,171.26


Trips by Gordon Smith
Total cost of congressperson's 15 trips: $34,496.17

Destination: SALT LAKE CITY, UT
Sponsor: Brigham Young University
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Mar 31, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $880.00
source

Destination: SAN FRANCISCO, CA
Sponsor: AMERICAN REUNION COUNCIL
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: May 5, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $1,060.00
source

Destination: DURHAM, NORTH CAROLINA
Sponsor: Council on Foreign Relations
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN A DEBATE
Date: Oct 10, 2000
Expense: $609.40
source

Destination: TUCSON, AZ
Sponsor: Edison Electric Institute
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Feb 18, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $419.50
source

Destination: LIVERPOOL, ENGLAND
Sponsor: SEA TREK FOUNDATION
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEECH, UNVEILING OF STATUE
Date: Aug 18, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $1,160.00
source

Destination: SALT LAKE CITY IDAHO
Sponsor: Brigham Young University
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Oct 7, 2001
Expense: $632.50
source

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: World Economic Forum
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN WORKSHOPS
Date: Jan 31, 2002 (4 days)
Expense: $2,156.00
source

Destination: SANTA BARBARA, CA
Sponsor: Jerusalem Fund for Education & Community Development
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Aug 5, 2002
Expense: $1,160.22
source

Destination: LOS ANGELES, CA
Sponsor: Motion Picture Association of America
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Feb 18, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $925.18
source

Destination: LOS ANGELES, CA
Sponsor: SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF LAW
Purpose: TO SPEAK AT A DEAN'S CIRCLE DINNER & TO GIVE A COMMENCEMENT SPEECH
Date: May 17, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $635.86
source

Destination: COUNTY MAYO, IRELAND
Sponsor: Century Business Services Inc
Purpose: SPEECH, PARTICIPATE IN ROUNDTABLES
Date: Aug 6, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $9,731.05
source

Destination: LONDON, ENGLAND
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: SPEECH, PARTICIPATE IN ROUNDTABLES
Date: Aug 10, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $11,715.68
source

Destination: CLEVELAND, OHIO
Sponsor: American Israel Public Affairs Committee and affiliates
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Aug 26, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $574.03
source

Destination: NEW YORK, NY
Sponsor: Jed Foundation
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEECH
Date: Jun 7, 2004
Expense: $737.17
source

Destination: MIAMI, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: SPEECH, PARTICIPATE IN ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSIONS
Date: Jan 12, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $2,099.58
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Gordon Smith

Lindsay Arnold
Alison Buist
Martha Cagle
Martin Doern
John Easton
Catherine Finley
Matt Hill
Wallace Hsueh
Lori Kinder
Richard Krikava
Joseph Lillis
Elizabeth Mcdonnell
Andrew Over
Kurt Pfotenhaver
Lori Prater
Louisa Schiller
Paul Unger
Jason Vaillancourt
Kathryn Webb
Valerie West
Rian Windsheiner



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.