American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

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American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.

Back to The Data

Office of

Don Nickles


Total cost of 112 office trips: $304,648.74


Trips by Don Nickles
Total cost of congressperson's 17 trips: $82,961.39

Destination: ST. THOMAS
Sponsor: Wine and Spirits Wholesalers of America Inc
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Date: Jan 11, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $4,531.98
source

Destination: ORLANDO, FL
Sponsor: Beer Institute
Purpose: SPEAK - KEYNOTE, BEER INSTITUTE WINTER RETREAT
Date: Nov 19, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $1,386.54
source

Destination: ROME, ITALY
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Date: Nov 24, 2000 (8 days)
Expense: $12,200.00
source

Destination: NAPLES, FL
Sponsor: Chamber of Commerce for the USA
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Dec 10, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $970.00
source

Destination: PALM SPRINGS, CA
Sponsor: Electric Power Supply Association
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Jan 28, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $3,777.67
source

Destination: KEY LARGO, FL
Sponsor: National Association of Manufacturers
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Feb 22, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $2,470.00
source

Destination: PEBBLE BEACH, CA
Sponsor: Lincoln Club of Northern California
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: Apr 28, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $5,875.07
source

Destination: GEORGIA
Sponsor: Corning Inc
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN THE AUGUSTA PUBLIC POLICY CONFERENCE
Date: Mar 8, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $2,646.56
source

Destination: GREENBRIER, WV
Sponsor: CSX Corporation
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: May 24, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,993.54
source

Destination: BEAVER CREEK, CO
Sponsor: American Enterprise Institute (AEI)
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Jun 20, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $4,900.00
source

Destination: IRELAND
Sponsor: Century Business Services Inc
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL SEMINAR
Date: Aug 6, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $7,975.00
source

Destination: LONDON, ENGLAND
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Aug 10, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $10,208.36
source

Destination: NAPLES, FL
Sponsor: Clark Consulting
Purpose: SPEECH AT CLARK BARDES FEDERAL POLICY GROUP
Date: Oct 24, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $2,579.60
source

Destination: PALM BEACH, FL
Sponsor: Club for Growth Inc
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL SEMINAR
Date: Feb 20, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $3,647.80
source

Destination: WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.VA
Sponsor: CSX Corporation
Purpose: LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE
Date: May 29, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $3,010.47
source

Destination: BEAVER CREEK, CO
Sponsor: American Enterprise Institute (AEI)
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL ISSUES FORUM
Date: Jun 18, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $5,082.00
source

Destination: HAWAII
Sponsor: American Academy of Actuaries
Purpose: SEMINAR AND CONFERENCE
Date: Oct 17, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $9,706.80
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Don Nickles

Derek Albro
Amy Angelier
Kathryn Barr
W Bret Bernhardt
Daniel Brandt
Daniel Branelt
Cara Duckworth
Katherine Gumerson
Stacey Harley
Megan Hauck
Rachel Hensler
Jody Hernandez
Don Kent
Matthew Kirk
Chan Klingensmith
J Mclane Layton
Stacey Lowder
Hazen Marshall
Marlo Meuli
Diane Moery
Stephen Moffitt
Lee Morris
Aaron Mullins
Maureen O'neill
Michael Osburn
K Gayle Osterberg
Anne Oswalt
David Pappone
Roy Phillips
Jennifer Quinlan
Brook Simmons
Margaret Stewart
Eric Ueland
C Stewart Verdery
Binyamin Zomer



American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.