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A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Office of

Michael Oxley


Total cost of 293 office trips: $492,111.80


Trips by Michael Oxley
Total cost of congressperson's 12 trips: $94,306.83

Destination: HYANNIS, MA
Sponsor: Invest to Compete Alliance
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL EDUCATIONAL SEMINAR
Date: Jul 6, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $3,246.00
source

Destination: VENICE, ITALY
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: BOARD MEETING TO DISCUSS POSSIBLE FUTURE SIGHTS & TOPICS FOR RIPON EDUCATIONAL FUND TRANSATLANTIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Date: Nov 21, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $4,500.00
source

Destination: ROME, ITALY
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: MEETINGS WITH U.S. GOVERNMENT/EUROPEAN COUNTERPARTS ON BIOTECHNOLOGY, E-COMMERCE, HEALTHCARE AND OTHER IMPORTANT ISSUES
Date: Nov 25, 2000 (7 days)
Expense: $9,900.00
source

Destination: PERSHIRE-EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: TRANSATLANTIC CONFERENCE FACT FINDING
Date: Aug 9, 2001 (9 days)
Expense: $9,732.57
source

Destination: DAVOS, SWITZERLAND
Sponsor: World Economic Forum
Purpose: PARTICIPANT IN WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM'S ANNUAL MEETING IN DAVOS
Date: Jan 22, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $9,464.00
source

Destination: LONDON, ENGLAND
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: TRANSATLANTIC MEETING WITH EUROPEAN LEADERSHIP
Date: Aug 10, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $15,174.81
source

Destination: LONDON - SCOTLAND - DULLES; WASHINGTON
Sponsor: Transatlantic Policy Network
Purpose: TRANSATLANTIC CONFERENCE; INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE
Date: Aug 17, 2003 (6 days)
Expense: $3,436.00
source

Destination: EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND
Sponsor: Transatlantic Policy Network
Purpose: TRANSATLANTIC CONFERENCE/INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE
Date: Aug 16, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $4,595.00
source

Destination: BUDAPEST, HUNGARY
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: 2004 TRANSATLANTIC CONFERENCE PANEL PARTICIPANT
Date: Nov 8, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $8,382.06
source

Destination: BRUSSELS
Sponsor: Transatlantic Policy Network
Purpose: TRANSATLANTIC CONFERENCE/INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE
Date: Dec 1, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $11,769.17
source

Destination: LONDON
Sponsor: INTERNATIONAL CORPORATE GOVERNANCE NETWORK
Purpose: INTERNATIONAL CORPORATE GOVERNANCE SPEECH AND MEETING WITH SHAREHOLDER ADVOCATES
Date: Jul 5, 2005 (5 days)
Expense: $9,606.79
source

Destination: EDINBURG SCOTLAND
Sponsor: Transatlantic Policy Network
Purpose: TRANSATLANTIC MEETING/INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE
Date: Aug 21, 2005 (5 days)
Expense: $4,500.43
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Michael Oxley

Peter Barrett
Dirk Bartlett
Sidney Blackmer
Dale Brown
Madeline Burns
Peter Burnt
John Butler
Cindy Chetti
James Clinger
James Conzelman
Justin Daly
Sapna Delacourt
Jared Dilley
Thomas Duncan
Dina Ellis
David Eppstein
Peter Erdman
Tucker Foote
Bob Foster
Alfred Garesche
Sam Geduldig
Kyle Gilster
Robert Gordon
Terry Haines
Hugh Halpern
Brant Imperatore
Kristen Jaconi
Tallman Johnson
Timothy Johnson
Clinton Jones
Paul Kangas
Karen Lynch
Kevin Macmillan
James Maday
Barbara Matthews
Tom Mccrocklin
Carter Mcdowell
Brookly Mclaughlin
Thomas Montgomery
Sarah Morgan
David Oxner
Peggy Peterson
Joe Pinner
Brendan Reilly
Linda Rich
Christopher Rosello
Aquiles Suarez
Charles Symington
Charles Sywington
Frank Tillotson
Glenn Westrich
W Scott Wilber
Greg Zerzan



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.