American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Office of

Michael Oxley


Total cost of 293 office trips: $492,111.80


Trips by Michael Oxley
Total cost of congressperson's 12 trips: $94,306.83

Destination: HYANNIS, MA
Sponsor: Invest to Compete Alliance
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL EDUCATIONAL SEMINAR
Date: Jul 6, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $3,246.00
source

Destination: VENICE, ITALY
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: BOARD MEETING TO DISCUSS POSSIBLE FUTURE SIGHTS & TOPICS FOR RIPON EDUCATIONAL FUND TRANSATLANTIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Date: Nov 21, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $4,500.00
source

Destination: ROME, ITALY
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: MEETINGS WITH U.S. GOVERNMENT/EUROPEAN COUNTERPARTS ON BIOTECHNOLOGY, E-COMMERCE, HEALTHCARE AND OTHER IMPORTANT ISSUES
Date: Nov 25, 2000 (7 days)
Expense: $9,900.00
source

Destination: PERSHIRE-EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: TRANSATLANTIC CONFERENCE FACT FINDING
Date: Aug 9, 2001 (9 days)
Expense: $9,732.57
source

Destination: DAVOS, SWITZERLAND
Sponsor: World Economic Forum
Purpose: PARTICIPANT IN WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM'S ANNUAL MEETING IN DAVOS
Date: Jan 22, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $9,464.00
source

Destination: LONDON, ENGLAND
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: TRANSATLANTIC MEETING WITH EUROPEAN LEADERSHIP
Date: Aug 10, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $15,174.81
source

Destination: LONDON - SCOTLAND - DULLES; WASHINGTON
Sponsor: Transatlantic Policy Network
Purpose: TRANSATLANTIC CONFERENCE; INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE
Date: Aug 17, 2003 (6 days)
Expense: $3,436.00
source

Destination: EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND
Sponsor: Transatlantic Policy Network
Purpose: TRANSATLANTIC CONFERENCE/INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE
Date: Aug 16, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $4,595.00
source

Destination: BUDAPEST, HUNGARY
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: 2004 TRANSATLANTIC CONFERENCE PANEL PARTICIPANT
Date: Nov 8, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $8,382.06
source

Destination: BRUSSELS
Sponsor: Transatlantic Policy Network
Purpose: TRANSATLANTIC CONFERENCE/INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE
Date: Dec 1, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $11,769.17
source

Destination: LONDON
Sponsor: INTERNATIONAL CORPORATE GOVERNANCE NETWORK
Purpose: INTERNATIONAL CORPORATE GOVERNANCE SPEECH AND MEETING WITH SHAREHOLDER ADVOCATES
Date: Jul 5, 2005 (5 days)
Expense: $9,606.79
source

Destination: EDINBURG SCOTLAND
Sponsor: Transatlantic Policy Network
Purpose: TRANSATLANTIC MEETING/INTERNATIONAL EXCHANGE
Date: Aug 21, 2005 (5 days)
Expense: $4,500.43
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Michael Oxley

Peter Barrett
Dirk Bartlett
Sidney Blackmer
Dale Brown
Madeline Burns
Peter Burnt
John Butler
Cindy Chetti
James Clinger
James Conzelman
Justin Daly
Sapna Delacourt
Jared Dilley
Thomas Duncan
Dina Ellis
David Eppstein
Peter Erdman
Tucker Foote
Bob Foster
Alfred Garesche
Sam Geduldig
Kyle Gilster
Robert Gordon
Terry Haines
Hugh Halpern
Brant Imperatore
Kristen Jaconi
Tallman Johnson
Timothy Johnson
Clinton Jones
Paul Kangas
Karen Lynch
Kevin Macmillan
James Maday
Barbara Matthews
Tom Mccrocklin
Carter Mcdowell
Brookly Mclaughlin
Thomas Montgomery
Sarah Morgan
David Oxner
Peggy Peterson
Joe Pinner
Brendan Reilly
Linda Rich
Christopher Rosello
Aquiles Suarez
Charles Symington
Charles Sywington
Frank Tillotson
Glenn Westrich
W Scott Wilber
Greg Zerzan



American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.