American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

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American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

Back to The Data

Office of

Sherwood Boehlert


Total cost of 110 office trips: $136,514.41


Trips by Sherwood Boehlert
Total cost of congressperson's 1 trips: $553.33

Destination: CORNING, NY
Sponsor: Corning Inc
Purpose: OFFICIAL BUSINESS, PLANT TOURS, BRIEFINGS ON LEGISLATION
Date: May 30, 2001
Expense: $553.33
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Sherwood Boehlert

Mark Abdy
Deborah Altenburg
Barry Beringer
Michael Bloomquist
Amy Carroll
Kevin Carroll
Amy Chiang
Timothy Clancy
Kathryn Clay
Dean D'amore
Edward Feddeman
Susannah Foster
Njema Frazier
Greg Garcia
David Goldston
Sara Gray
Elizabeth Grossman
Ben Grumbles
James Hague
Tom Hammond
Eli Hopson
Colin Hubbell
Olwen Huxley
Illegible Illegible
Diane Jones
Tina Kaarsberg
Karen Kimball
Karin Lohman
Johannes Loschnigg
John Mimikakis
Ruben Mitchell
Kenneth Monroe
Robert Palmer
Joseph Pouliot
Peter Rooney
Gabe Rozsa
Arun Seraphin
Marsha Shasteen
Martin Spitzer
Eric Sterner
Thomas Vancle
Thomas Vanek
Harlan Watson
Eric Webster
Cameron Wilson



American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.