American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.

Back to The Data

Office of

Carolyn Mccarthy


Total cost of 28 office trips: $33,766.32


Trips by Carolyn Mccarthy
Total cost of congressperson's 11 trips: $14,098.32

Destination: NEW ORLEANS, LA
Sponsor: Democratic Leadership Council
Purpose: DLC SPRING RETREAT
Date: Apr 28, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $882.40
source

Destination: KEYNOTE AT CONFERENCE
Sponsor: NORTH CAROLINIANS AGAINST GUN VIOLENCE
Purpose: KEYNOTE
Date: Mar 2, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $685.25
source

Destination: TURNBERRY ISLE RESORT, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Harvard University
Purpose: HEALTH CARE CONFERENCE
Date: Jan 17, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $2,577.95
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Ceasefire Oregon
Purpose: SPEAK AT ORGANIZATION'S MEETING
Date: Feb 22, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $783.00
source

Destination: CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Sponsor: INTERFAITH INITIATIVES AGAINST GUN VIOLENCE
Purpose: TALK TO INTERFAITH INITIATIVES AGAINST GUN VIOLENCE
Date: May 3, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $140.00
source

Destination: BELFAST, NORTHERN IRELAND
Sponsor: International Women's Democracy Center
Purpose:
Date: Jan 11, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $1,403.08
source

Destination: NEW YORK LAGUARDIA TO NEW ORLEANS TO SAN FRANCISCO
Sponsor: Association of Government Attorneys in Capital Litigation
Purpose: TO ADDRESS NATIONAL CONFERENCE
Date: Jul 29, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $546.00
source

Destination: WASHINGTON, DC TO NEW YORK CITY TO MINEOLA, NY
Sponsor: New York Stock Exchange
Purpose: TO VIEW EXCHANGE AND DISCUSS ISSUES OF INTEREST
Date: Jan 29, 2004
Expense: $524.78
source

Destination: WASH. NATIONAL TO MIAMI TO LAGUARDIA, NEW YORK CITY, NY
Sponsor: NASDAQ
Purpose: NASDAQ LEADERSHIP SUMMIT-TO INCREASE DIALOGUE BETWEEN GOV'T LEADERS AND NASDAQ LISTED COMMUNITY
Date: Apr 2, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $3,157.55
source

Destination: FORT LAUDERDALE, FL
Sponsor: Harvard University
Purpose: TO ATTEND THE BIPARTISAN CONGRESSIONAL HEALTH POLICY CONFERENCE
Date: Jan 13, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $2,203.36
source

Destination: N.Y. (LAGUARDIA) TO CHICAGO, ILL. TO WASHINGTON, DC
Sponsor: CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE, CHICAGO MERCANTILE EXCHANGE, CHICAGO STOCK EXCHANGE, CHICAGO BOARD OF OPTIONS EXCHANGE
Purpose: TO REVIEW OPERATIONS OF THE SPONSORS AND TO DISCUSS OTHER FINANCIAL SERVICES MATTERS
Date: Apr 17, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $1,194.95
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Carolyn Mccarthy

Kim Beckwell
Christopher Chaffee
James Hart
Matthew Larkin
Mary Ellen Mendelsohn
Jim Messina
Joanne Rising
Christopher Rosello



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.