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A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Office of

Rush Holt


Total cost of 20 office trips: $75,931.67


Trips by Rush Holt
Total cost of congressperson's 13 trips: $65,212.86

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: New York Stock Exchange
Purpose: ATTEND NYSE DAY FOR FRESHMAN MEMBERS
Date: Jan 24, 2000
Expense: $433.75
source

Destination: DELHI- HYDERABAD - BANGALORE - DELHI
Sponsor: Confederation of Indian Industry
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: Jan 6, 2001 (12 days)
Expense: $15,955.08
source

Destination: GREENBRIER
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: BIPARTISAN CONGRESSIONAL RETREAT
Date: Mar 9, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $1,202.00
source

Destination: BANGALORE, INDIA
Sponsor: Confederation of Indian Industry
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION TRIP, DELIVERED SPEECH TO THE 2002 ANNUAL MEETING OF WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM
Date: Dec 31, 2001 (13 days)
Expense: $1,684.66
source

Destination: CHINA
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON US-CHINA RELATIONS
Date: Mar 29, 2002 (9 days)
Expense: $16,433.00
source

Destination: CARLSTON COLLEGE, NORTHFIELD MN
Sponsor: Carleton College
Purpose: TO SPEAK AS PART OF THE "WHAT PHYSICISTS DO" LECTURE SERIES
Date: Apr 19, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $439.10
source

Destination: COLUMBIA - MISSOURI
Sponsor: STEPHENS COLLEGE
Purpose: TO GIVE THE "ROBLES LECTURE" ON ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR THOSE IN PUBLIC SERVICE
Date: Apr 27, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $364.50
source

Destination: NEWARK, NJ - CANCUN, MEXICO - NEWARK, NJ
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION REFORM
Date: Feb 17, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $7,177.87
source

Destination: NEWARK AIRPORT - LAS VEGAS AIRPORT - ZION NATIONAL PARK-PARUNUWEAP WILDERNESS STUDY AREA-KANAB, UTAH-GRAND STAIRCASE-ESCALANTE NATIONAL MONUMENT-MOAB, UTAH-ESCALANTE, UTAH - LAS VEGAS AIRPORT - NEWARK AIRPORT
Sponsor: Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance
Purpose: TO DISCUSS NATIONAL PARK SERVICE TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS AND OTHER WILDERNESS AND PARK ISSUES
Date: May 23, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $1,669.50
source

Destination: PUNTA MITA, MEXICO
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON U.S. POLICY IN LATIN AMERICA
Date: Jan 9, 2005 (5 days)
Expense: $7,159.56
source

Destination: PARIS-LONDON-STUTTGART-VADUZ, LIECHTENSTEIN-BRESSANONE, ITALY-WASHINGTON, DC; ML: NEWARK-STUTTGART-VADUZ-BRESSANONE
Sponsor: International Management and Development Institute
Purpose: TO MEET WITH BUSINESS AND GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES TO DISCUSS ECONOMIC, TRADE, AND FOREIGN POLICY INTERESTS OF MUTUAL CONCERN AND INTEREST
Date: Feb 23, 2005 (6 days)
Expense: $11,304.55
source

Destination: PHILADELPHIA, PA-MADISON, WI-NEWARK, NJ
Sponsor: University of Wisconsin
Purpose: TO ADDRESS THE ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF LESS COMMONLY TAUGHT LANGUAGES
Date: Apr 15, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $386.29
source

Destination: COLBY COLLEGE (WATERVILLE, ME)
Sponsor: Goldfarb Center for Public Affairs and Civic Engagement at Colby College
Purpose: TO ADDRESS COLBY COLLEGE STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND LOCAL RESIDENTS ON ENERGY POLICY IN THE NEW CONGRESS
Date: Apr 24, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $1,003.00
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Rush Holt

Mark Dedrick
Matthew Dennis
Bill Goold
Mark Matzen
Michelle Mulder
Jennifer Surovy



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.