American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Office of

Rush Holt


Total cost of 20 office trips: $75,931.67


Trips by Rush Holt
Total cost of congressperson's 13 trips: $65,212.86

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: New York Stock Exchange
Purpose: ATTEND NYSE DAY FOR FRESHMAN MEMBERS
Date: Jan 24, 2000
Expense: $433.75
source

Destination: DELHI- HYDERABAD - BANGALORE - DELHI
Sponsor: Confederation of Indian Industry
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL
Date: Jan 6, 2001 (12 days)
Expense: $15,955.08
source

Destination: GREENBRIER
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: BIPARTISAN CONGRESSIONAL RETREAT
Date: Mar 9, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $1,202.00
source

Destination: BANGALORE, INDIA
Sponsor: Confederation of Indian Industry
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION TRIP, DELIVERED SPEECH TO THE 2002 ANNUAL MEETING OF WORLD ECONOMIC FORUM
Date: Dec 31, 2001 (13 days)
Expense: $1,684.66
source

Destination: CHINA
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON US-CHINA RELATIONS
Date: Mar 29, 2002 (9 days)
Expense: $16,433.00
source

Destination: CARLSTON COLLEGE, NORTHFIELD MN
Sponsor: Carleton College
Purpose: TO SPEAK AS PART OF THE "WHAT PHYSICISTS DO" LECTURE SERIES
Date: Apr 19, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $439.10
source

Destination: COLUMBIA - MISSOURI
Sponsor: STEPHENS COLLEGE
Purpose: TO GIVE THE "ROBLES LECTURE" ON ETHICAL RESPONSIBILITIES FOR THOSE IN PUBLIC SERVICE
Date: Apr 27, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $364.50
source

Destination: NEWARK, NJ - CANCUN, MEXICO - NEWARK, NJ
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON EDUCATION REFORM
Date: Feb 17, 2004 (4 days)
Expense: $7,177.87
source

Destination: NEWARK AIRPORT - LAS VEGAS AIRPORT - ZION NATIONAL PARK-PARUNUWEAP WILDERNESS STUDY AREA-KANAB, UTAH-GRAND STAIRCASE-ESCALANTE NATIONAL MONUMENT-MOAB, UTAH-ESCALANTE, UTAH - LAS VEGAS AIRPORT - NEWARK AIRPORT
Sponsor: Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance
Purpose: TO DISCUSS NATIONAL PARK SERVICE TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS AND OTHER WILDERNESS AND PARK ISSUES
Date: May 23, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $1,669.50
source

Destination: PUNTA MITA, MEXICO
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON U.S. POLICY IN LATIN AMERICA
Date: Jan 9, 2005 (5 days)
Expense: $7,159.56
source

Destination: PARIS-LONDON-STUTTGART-VADUZ, LIECHTENSTEIN-BRESSANONE, ITALY-WASHINGTON, DC; ML: NEWARK-STUTTGART-VADUZ-BRESSANONE
Sponsor: International Management and Development Institute
Purpose: TO MEET WITH BUSINESS AND GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVES TO DISCUSS ECONOMIC, TRADE, AND FOREIGN POLICY INTERESTS OF MUTUAL CONCERN AND INTEREST
Date: Feb 23, 2005 (6 days)
Expense: $11,304.55
source

Destination: PHILADELPHIA, PA-MADISON, WI-NEWARK, NJ
Sponsor: University of Wisconsin
Purpose: TO ADDRESS THE ANNUAL CONFERENCE OF THE NATIONAL COUNCIL OF LESS COMMONLY TAUGHT LANGUAGES
Date: Apr 15, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $386.29
source

Destination: COLBY COLLEGE (WATERVILLE, ME)
Sponsor: Goldfarb Center for Public Affairs and Civic Engagement at Colby College
Purpose: TO ADDRESS COLBY COLLEGE STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND LOCAL RESIDENTS ON ENERGY POLICY IN THE NEW CONGRESS
Date: Apr 24, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $1,003.00
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Rush Holt

Mark Dedrick
Matthew Dennis
Bill Goold
Mark Matzen
Michelle Mulder
Jennifer Surovy



American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.