American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Office of

Max Baucus


Total cost of 176 office trips: $293,589.73


Trips by Max Baucus
Total cost of congressperson's 3 trips: $7,102.55

Destination: LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA
Sponsor: Chamber of Commerce for the USA
Purpose: KEYNOTE ADDRESS AT THE US CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BOARD MEETING RE: GOVERNMENT POLICY ISSUES CONCERNING AMERICAN BUSINESS
Date: Feb 25, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $3,852.55
source

Destination: CUBA
Sponsor: Center for International Policy
Purpose: FACT FINDING MISSION
Date: Sep 13, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $600.00
source

Destination: CHINA (BEIJING & SHANGHAI)
Sponsor: Mansfield Foundation
Purpose: TO MEET WITH CHINESE OFFICIALS AND BUSINESS LEADERS TO DISCUSS BILATERAL ECONOMIC RELATIONS
Date: Mar 15, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $2,650.00
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Max Baucus

Ryan Abraham
Sara Andrews
Shara Aranoff
Lara Birkes
Diana Birkett
Jonathan Blum
Pat Bousliman
Karen Bridges
Simon Chabel
Andrea Cohen
Jay Driscoll
Michael Evans
Kim Falcon
James Foley
Jeff Forbes
Elizabeth Fowler
Maria Freese
Matt Genasci
Jodi George
John Gilliland
Devin Goodman
Laura Hayes
Patrick Heck
Daryl Herman
Angela Hofmann
Shawn Johnson
Matt Jones
Ronnie Keller
Kate Kirchgraber
Brian Kuehl
Anya Landau
Janis Lazda
Dawn Levy
Elizabeth Liebschutz
Holly Luck
Demetrios Malantis
Demetrios Marantis
Anela Marshall
Jim Messina
Christopher Miller
Judy Miller
Michael Mongan
Melissa Mueller
Brian Pomper
Brian Ponper
Theodore Posner
Cary Pugh
Tim Punke
Anita Rizek
Sara Roberts
Jonathan Salib
Ben Sather
David Schwartz
John Shepard
Tom Sliter
Carolyn Smith
Doug Steiger
Daniel Stein
Matthew Stores
Russ Sullivan
John Van Atta
Alice Weiss
Ira Wolf



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.