American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Office of

Roy Blunt


Total cost of 183 office trips: $369,474.80


Trips by Roy Blunt
Total cost of congressperson's 15 trips: $18,394.68

Destination: KANSAS CITY - WASHINGTON DC
Sponsor: Dairy Farmers of America
Purpose: SPEAKER AT DFA ANNUAL MEETING
Date: Apr 10, 2000
Expense: $881.00
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Hallmark Cards Inc
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: May 7, 2001
Expense: $177.02
source

Destination: FT. WORTH, TX
Sponsor: BNSF Railway Company
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP
Date: Jun 25, 2001
Expense: $1,516.75
source

Destination: ISRAEL
Sponsor: American Israel Education Foundation
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL MISSION
Date: Aug 18, 2001 (8 days)
Expense: $2,528.81
source

Destination: ST. LOUIS, MO - DULLES AIRPORT
Sponsor: Emerson Electric Co
Purpose: MEETINGS
Date: Oct 30, 2001
Expense: $958.00
source

Destination: DC - ARIZONA
Sponsor: International Mass Retail Association
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT & MEETINGS
Date: Jan 21, 2002
Expense: $2,599.50
source

Destination: ST. MICHAEL'S
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: ELC RETREAT
Date: Jan 24, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $190.00
source

Destination: GREENBRIER HOTEL, WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS WV
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: MEMBER'S CONFERENCE RETREAT
Date: Jan 30, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $785.00
source

Destination: BOCA RATON, FL
Sponsor: Chamber of Commerce for the USA
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Feb 24, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $1,886.70
source

Destination: ST. MICHAELS, MARYLAND
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: LEADERSHIP RETREAT
Date: Jan 29, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $717.00
source

Destination: REPUBLICAN PLANNING
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: REPUBLICAN PLANNING RETREAT
Date: Feb 6, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $1,214.00
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Dairy Farmers of America
Purpose: SPEAK TO ANNUAL MEETING
Date: Mar 24, 2003
Expense: $1,712.69
source

Destination: DC TO ST MICHAELS MARYLAND BACK
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: HOUSE LEADERSHIP RETREAT
Date: Jan 14, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $900.21
source

Destination: SPRINGFIELD, MO-BENTONVILLE AR-WASHINGTON DC
Sponsor: STUDENTS IN FREE ENTERPRISE
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT "SIFE" STUDENTS IN FREE ENTERPRISE ANNUAL BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING
Date: Nov 3, 2004
Expense: $1,600.00
source

Destination: IRVINGTON VA
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: BICAMERAL LEADERSHIP RETREAT
Date: Nov 29, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $728.00
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Roy Blunt

Ali Amirhooshmand
Mark Anderson
Trevor Blackann
Kirk Boyle
Neil Bradley
Tared Craighead
Brian Diffell
Jennifer Douris
John Dutton
Richard Eddings
Amy Field
Josh Fleming
Brian Gaston
Sam Geduldig
H Floyd Gilzow
Matt Haase
Greg Hartley
Michelle Hawks
Dave Hebert
Johnnie Kaberle
Samuel Langholz
Don Lucietta
Annissa Mcdonald
Steve Mcintosh
Kyle Nevins
Susan Sheybani
Amy Steinmann
Burson Taylor
Robert Joseph Trauger
Mildred Webber



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.