American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

Back to The Data

Office of

Roger Wicker


Total cost of 32 office trips: $115,225.64


Trips by Roger Wicker
Total cost of congressperson's 10 trips: $60,414.23

Destination: GALVESTON, TEXAS
Sponsor: United States Association of Former Members of Congress
Purpose: TO ATTEND 19TH ANNUAL CONGRESS-BURDESTAG SEMINAR
Date: Mar 25, 2002 (3 days)
Expense: $1,555.20
source

Destination: WASHINGTON DC - BALTIMORE
Sponsor: Heritage Foundation
Purpose: CONSERVATIVE MEMBERS RETREAT
Date: Feb 3, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $632.11
source

Destination: AMSTERDAME TO VENICE, ITALY (KLM)
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON THE U.S.-RUSSIA-EUROPE RELATIONS
Date: Aug 22, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $8,688.20
source

Destination: NAPLES, FLORIDA
Sponsor: American Shipbuilding Association
Purpose: TO PROVIDE A FORUM FOR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS AND LEADERS OF THE SHIPBUILDING INDUSTRY TO SHARE AREAS OF CONCERN, AND TO DISCUSS POLICY AND LEGISLATION TO REBUILD OUR SEA SERVICES AND THE SHIPBUILDING INDUSTRY
Date: Nov 30, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $2,828.71
source

Destination: MEMPHIS TO PHOENIX TO MEMPHIS FOR GAYLE WICKER MEMPHIS TO PHOENIX FOR REP. WICKER
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: 104TH CLASS RETREAT
Date: Jan 7, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $1,638.00
source

Destination: PHOENIX - PUERTO VALLARTA - MEMPHIS FOR REP. WICKER; MEMPHIS - PUERTO VALLARTA - MEMPHIS FOR CAROLINE WICKER
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON US POLICY IN LATIN AMERICA IN PUNTA MITA, MEXICO
Date: Jan 9, 2005 (5 days)
Expense: $7,521.84
source

Destination: SEOUL, SOUTH KOREA - KUALA LUMPUR, MALAYSIA - LANGKAWI, MALAYSIA
Sponsor: KOREA US EXCHANGE COUNCIL AND US MALAYSIA EXCHANGE ASSOCIATION
Purpose: S. KOREA: MEET W/ADMIN REPS. MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT, NAT'L SECURITY ADVISOR, & US BUSINESS TO DISCUSS US TROOP PRESENCE IN KOREA/N. KOREA NUCLEAR PROLIFERATION. MALAYSIA: MEET W/ PRIME MINISTER AND OTHER CABINET OFFICIALS TO LEARN MORE OF THE US BUSINESS &
Date: Feb 18, 2005 (10 days)
Expense: $27,757.98
source

Destination: MANASSAS, VA - STARKVILLE, MS, MUNICIPAL AIRSTRIP
Sponsor: Aurora Flight Sciences
Purpose: DELIVER SPEECH FOR RIBBON CUTTING/GRAND OPENING AT AURORA'S STARKVILLE UAV FACTORY. PRIVATE AIRCRAFT WAS USED. EQUIVALENT FIRST CLASS AIRFARE FROM DCA TO GTR
Date: Apr 29, 2005
Expense: $616.70
source

Destination:
Sponsor: ISLE OF CAPRI CORP.
Purpose: CHARITY BENEFIT CONCERT FOR THE BB KING MUSEUM
Date: Jul 30, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $334.19
source

Destination: DULBIN
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON US - RUSSIA - EUROPE RELATIONS
Date: Aug 21, 2005 (5 days)
Expense: $8,841.30
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Roger Wicker

Bradley Ayers
Michelle Barlow
Jennifer Biggy
Kim Chamberlin
John Keast
Aubert Kimbrell
James Perry
Lemuel Smith
Susan Sweat
Erskine Wells



American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.