American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Office of

Sander Levin


Total cost of 41 office trips: $134,282.97


Trips by Sander Levin
Total cost of congressperson's 24 trips: $105,710.97

Destination: AVENTURA, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Harvard University
Purpose: HEALTH POLICY CONFERENCE
Date: Jan 20, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $2,686.30
source

Destination: GRAND CAYMAN ISLAND
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO ATTEND CONFERENCE ON U.S. POLICY TOWARD CUBA
Date: Apr 18, 2000 (4 days)
Expense: $4,796.60
source

Destination: PRAGUE, CZECH REPUBLIC
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: CONFERENCE ON U.S.-RUSSIA RELATIONS
Date: Aug 20, 2000 (5 days)
Expense: $4,669.80
source

Destination: BRUSSELS, BELGIUM; VENICE, ITALY
Sponsor: CONGRESSIONAL ECONOMIC LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE AND TRANSATLANTIC POLICY NETWORK
Purpose: TPN WINTER MEETING AND CELI STUDY VISIT
Date: Nov 27, 2000 (7 days)
Expense: $5,592.25
source

Destination: AVENTURA, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Harvard University
Purpose: CONGRESSIONAL HEALTH POLICY CONFERENCE
Date: Jan 11, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $1,729.87
source

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: Columbia University
Purpose: SPEAKER AT CONFERENCE
Date: Mar 16, 2001
Expense: $454.50
source

Destination: FLORENCE, ITALY
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN CONFERENCE ON THE CONVERGENCE OF U.S. NATIONAL SECURITY AND THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT
Date: May 29, 2001 (4 days)
Expense: $7,232.00
source

Destination: SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA
Sponsor: Brookings Institution
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN CONGRESSIONAL RETREAT ON WELFARE REFORM
Date: Jan 9, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $1,687.50
source

Destination: PUERTO VALLARTA, MEXICO
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: CONFERENCE ON ISLAM TERRORISM AND THE U.S. RESPONSE
Date: Jan 10, 2002 (5 days)
Expense: $7,202.14
source

Destination: AVENTURA, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Harvard University
Purpose: BIPARTISAN CONGRESSIONAL HEALTH POLICY CONFERENCE
Date: Jan 17, 2002 (2 days)
Expense: $2,222.95
source

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: World Economic Forum
Purpose: PARTICIPANT
Date: Jan 31, 2002 (4 days)
Expense: $1,993.50
source

Destination: DETROIT-SAN FRANCISCO-WASH, DC
Sponsor: Stanford University
Purpose: SPEECH
Date: May 18, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $638.80
source

Destination: MACKINAC ISLAND, MICHIGAN
Sponsor: Detroit Regional Chamber of Commerce
Purpose: TO ATTEND LEADERSHIP POLICY CONFERENCE
Date: Jun 1, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $340.70
source

Destination: HAWAII
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN CONGRESSIONAL PROGRAM
Date: Jan 17, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $8,381.80
source

Destination: PUERTO VALLARTA, MEXICO
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN CONFERENCE ON US-MEXICO RELATIONS
Date: Dec 4, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $4,866.00
source

Destination: HONOLULU, HAWAII
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON US-CHINA RELATIONS
Date: Jan 5, 2004 (6 days)
Expense: $7,748.80
source

Destination: GEORGETOWN, BAHAMAS
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN CONFERENCE ON BRAZIL
Date: Apr 13, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $7,177.00
source

Destination: WASH, DC-BOSTON, MASS-DETROIT, MI
Sponsor: Harvard University
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN CONFERENCE
Date: Apr 30, 2004
Expense: $812.90
source

Destination: BARCELONA, SPAIN
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN CONFERENCE ON POLITICAL ISLAM
Date: May 21, 2004 (7 days)
Expense: $7,651.40
source

Destination: MACKINAC ISLAND, MI
Sponsor: Detroit Regional Chamber of Commerce
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN POLICY CONFERENCE
Date: Jun 3, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $765.18
source

Destination: PUERTO VALLARTA, MEXICO
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON WS POLICY IN LATIN AMERICA
Date: Jan 9, 2005 (4 days)
Expense: $6,058.68
source

Destination: DETROIT, MI-CHICAGO, IL-SHANGHAI-BEIJING, CHINA-WASH, DC
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON U.S. CHINA RELATIONS
Date: Mar 25, 2005 (9 days)
Expense: $20,439.00
source

Destination: PHILADELPHIA, PENN
Sponsor: Americans United to Protect Social Security
Purpose: INVITED TO ATTEND TOWN HALL
Date: Apr 4, 2005
Expense: $250.00
source

Destination: ERIE, PENN
Sponsor: Americans United to Protect Social Security
Purpose: INVITED TO ATTEND TOWN HALL
Date: May 16, 2005
Expense: $313.30
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Sander Levin

Michael Castellano
Michael Costellano
David Ettinger
Christina Hardesty
Joe Mckelvey
Morna Miller



American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.