American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.

Back to The Data

Office of

Blanche Lincoln


Total cost of 128 office trips: $190,984.39


Trips by Blanche Lincoln
Total cost of congressperson's 11 trips: $23,162.02

Destination: MEMPHIS, TN
Sponsor: JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Purpose: TO RECEIVE TOP TEN OUTSTANDING YOUNG AMERICAN AWARD
Date: Jan 15, 1999 (1 day)
Expense: $445.00
source

Destination: LAS VEGAS, NV
Sponsor: Institute of Scrap Recycling Industries
Purpose: SPEAK TO THEIR ANNUAL NATIONAL CONVENTION
Date: Mar 15, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $2,409.24
source

Destination: LYNCHBURG, VIRGINIA
Sponsor: RANDOLPH-MACON WOMAN'S COLLEGE
Purpose: COMMENCEMENT SPEAKER
Date: May 13, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $245.00
source

Destination: CUBA
Sponsor: Center for International Policy
Purpose: FACT-FINDING MISSION
Date: May 28, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $1,197.00
source

Destination: SAN DIEGO, CALIFORNIA
Sponsor: National Cotton Council
Purpose: ADDRESS THE NATIONAL COTTON COUNCIL'S ANNUAL MEETING AND TO ATTEND A CONFERENCE WITH COTTON INDUSTRY REPRESENTATIVES FROM ARKANSAS
Date: Jan 29, 2001
Expense: $3,669.79
source

Destination: RUSSELLVILLE, ARKANSAS
Sponsor: Entergy Corporation
Purpose: SPEECH ON NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY TO ARKANSAS NUCLEAR ONE LICENSE EXTENSION
Date: Jul 9, 2001
Expense: $2,800.00
source

Destination: PALM DESERT, CALIFORNIA
Sponsor: Chi Omega Foundation
Purpose: SPEAK AT CONVENTION AND TO RECEIVE THE WOMAN OF ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
Date: Jun 29, 2002 (1 day)
Expense: $1,100.00
source

Destination: HEBER SPRINGS, ARKANSAS
Sponsor: Arkansas Orthopaedic Society
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER FOR ANNUAL CONVENTION
Date: Apr 12, 2003
Expense: $1,035.30
source

Destination: MACKINAC ISLAND, MI
Sponsor: Democratic Leadership Council
Purpose: POLICY RETREAT-PARTICIPATE IN POLICY DISCUSSIONS ON HOMELAND SECURITY, NATIONAL SECURITY, BUDGET AND TAXES
Date: Sep 12, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $3,194.00
source

Destination: TURNBERRY ISLE, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Harvard University
Purpose: SPEECH ON HEALTHCARE
Date: Jan 13, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $3,100.89
source

Destination: ORLANDO, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Association of American Railroads
Purpose: SPOKE TO ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN RAILROAD'S LEGISLATIVE CONFERENCE ON TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE
Date: Feb 18, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $3,965.80
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Blanche Lincoln

Charles Barnett
Kelly Bingel
Jack Campbell
Mac Campbell
Courtney Clabaugh
Betty Davis
Cynthia Edwards
Amber Elbert
John Gilliland
Andrew Goesl
Stephen Higginbothom
Robert Holifield
Hannah Lambiotte
Matt Largen
Elizabeth Macdonald
Brandon Mcbride
Anthony Mcclain
Courtney Mcdade
Lori Neal
Ben Noble
Stephen Patterson
Jonathan Rhodes
Kelly Rucker
Jim Stowers
Anna Taylor
Amy Woodman
Todd Wooten
Donna Yeargan



American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: The Internet of the 1930s

    Some predicted radio would be a powerful force for democratizing information and spreading knowledge to a vast population previously separated by geography or income. But the new technology also raised anxieties.