American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

Back to The Data

Office of

Thomas Allen


Total cost of 36 office trips: $108,187.55


Trips by Thomas Allen
Total cost of congressperson's 17 trips: $80,620.66

Destination: SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT
Date: Feb 18, 2000 (4 days)
Expense: $6,705.60
source

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: DRUMMOND WOODSUM & MAC MAHON
Purpose: SPEAK BEFORE AMERICAN BAR ASSN-INSTALLATION EVENT FOR ROBERT HIRSHON FROM PORTLAND, ME AS PRESIDENT
Date: Jul 7, 2000
Expense: $690.00
source

Destination: FLORENCE, ITALY
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON THE CONVERGENCE OF U.S. NATIONAL SECURITY & THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT
Date: May 29, 2001 (5 days)
Expense: $7,350.50
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Harvard University
Purpose: HEALTH POLICY CONFERENCE
Date: Jan 17, 2002 (3 days)
Expense: $3,719.45
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON US-CHINA RELATIONS
Date: Mar 29, 2002 (9 days)
Expense: $15,000.00
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Generic Pharmaceutical Association
Purpose: TO SPEAK IN A CONFERENCE ABOUT TRADE
Date: Apr 11, 2002
Expense: $746.00
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON US-CHINA RELATIONS
Date: Jan 17, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $11,250.80
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Harvard University
Purpose: BIPARTISAN CONGRESSIONAL HEALTH POLICY CONFERENCE
Date: Feb 16, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $1,282.89
source

Destination: WASHINGTON-FINLAND-DISTRICT
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON POLITICAL ISLAM
Date: Jun 27, 2003 (6 days)
Expense: $8,165.10
source

Destination: FORT MYERS
Sponsor: American Shipbuilding Association
Purpose: TO DISCUSS THE SHIPBUILDING INDUSTRY AND ITS FUTURE
Date: Dec 1, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,287.12
source

Destination: PUNTA MITA, MEXICO
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON US MEXICO RELATIONS
Date: Dec 4, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $6,519.00
source

Destination: FT. FAUDERDALE
Sponsor: Harvard University
Purpose: BIPARTISAN CONGRESSIONAL HEALTH POLICY CONFERENCE
Date: Feb 15, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $1,938.76
source

Destination: LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT
Date: Jun 27, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $10,812.80
source

Destination: FORT MYERS
Sponsor: American Shipbuilding Association
Purpose: TO PROVIDE A FORUM FOR MEMBERS OF CONGRESS AND LEADERS OF THE SHIPBUILDING INDUSTRY TO SHARE AREAS OF CONCERN, AND TO DISCUSS POLICY AND LEGISLATION TO REBUILD SEA SERVICES AND THE SHIPBUILDING INDUSTRY
Date: Nov 30, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $1,469.37
source

Destination: FT. LAUDERDALE
Sponsor: Harvard University
Purpose: BIPARTISAN HEALTH POLICY CONFERENCE
Date: Jan 13, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $2,528.66
source

Destination: DENVER
Sponsor: Keystone Center
Purpose: ATTENDING THE ANNUAL KEYSTONE ENERGY BOARD MEETING
Date: Feb 10, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $870.51
source

Destination: PORTLAND, ME TO ORLANDO, FL TO WASHINGTON, DC
Sponsor: Association of Clinical Research Professionals
Purpose: PANEL DISCUSSION ON PRESCRIPTION DRUG REIMPORTATION
Date: Apr 6, 2005
Expense: $284.10
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Thomas Allen

Danielle Allen
James Bradley
Jolene Chonko
Janice Cooper
Shawna Friedman
James Keena
Susan Lexer
Matthew Nelson
Todd Stein
Catherine Turner
Allison Vogt



American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.