American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Office of

Dennis Moore


Total cost of 37 office trips: $92,926.54


Trips by Dennis Moore
Total cost of congressperson's 13 trips: $58,622.22

Destination: BIRMINGHAM, MONTGOMERY AND SELMA, ALABAMA
Sponsor: Faith & Politics Institute
Purpose: VISIT HISTORIC CIVIL RIGHTS SIGHTS IN ALABAMA
Date: Mar 5, 1999 (2 days)
Expense: $944.48
source

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: MERRILL LYNCH/NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE
Purpose: BANKING & UN FACT-FINDING MISSION
Date: Jan 23, 2000 (2 days)
Expense: $1,922.00
source

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: Humpty Dumpty Institute
Purpose: BANKING & UN FACT-FINDING MISSION
Date: Jan 24, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $958.50
source

Destination: BIPARTISAN RETREAT
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: BIPARTISAN RETREAT
Date: Mar 9, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $1,202.00
source

Destination:
Sponsor: Democratic Leadership Council
Purpose: RETREAT/STRATEGY & POLICY
Date: May 10, 2001 (3 days)
Expense: $2,110.95
source

Destination: MIAMI, HAVANNA
Sponsor: Lexington Institute
Purpose: MEET CUBAN TRADE OFFICIALS, DISSIDENTS, AND GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS
Date: Mar 7, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $2,558.02
source

Destination: FT. LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA
Sponsor: NASDAQ
Purpose: ATTEND & PARTICIPATE IN THE NASDAQ LEADERSHIP SUMMITT
Date: Mar 28, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $7,182.05
source

Destination: VISIT MICROSOFT CAMPUS
Sponsor: Microsoft Corporation
Purpose:
Date: Jul 26, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $5,610.43
source

Destination: NAPA VALLEY, CA
Sponsor: WineAmerica
Purpose: EDUCATIONAL TOUR OF NAPA VALLEY
Date: Oct 17, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $5,609.14
source

Destination: BEIJING (PRC) TO SHIJIAZHUANG TO XIBAIPO TO BEIJING
Sponsor: US Asia Foundation
Purpose: MEET WITH CHINESE OFFICIALS, BUILD A COMPUTER LAB IN XIBAIPO
Date: Oct 23, 2003 (6 days)
Expense: $19,805.55
source

Destination: MIAMI, FL
Sponsor: NASDAQ
Purpose: DIALOGUE WITH NASDAQ-LISTED BUSINESSES
Date: Apr 2, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $5,719.80
source

Destination: MIAMI
Sponsor: Securities Industry Association
Purpose: CONFERENCE BOUGHT TOGETHER MEMBER OF CONGRESS, CONGRESSIONAL STAFF, AND REPRESENTATIVES OF THE SECURITIES INDUSTRY TO DISCUSS LEGISLATIVE AND REGULATORY INITIATIVES IMPRINTING INDUSTRY
Date: Apr 1, 2005 (4 days)
Expense: $4,549.30
source

Destination: NEW ORLEANS
Sponsor: HEART TO HEART INTERNATIONAL OF OLATHE, KS
Purpose: SURVEY DAMAGE & RELIEF EFFORTS FOLLOWING HURRICANE KATRINA
Date: Sep 4, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $450.00
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Dennis Moore

Christie Appelhant
Howard Bauleke
Jason Cole
John Compton
Jana Denning
Becky Fast
Laura Hall
Peter Kay
Andrew Lewin
Julie Merz
Adam Pase
Jennifer Pechar



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.