American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Office of

Dan Burton


Total cost of 79 office trips: $184,971.00


Trips by Dan Burton
Total cost of congressperson's 7 trips: $30,596.50

Destination: ORLANDO, FLORIDA
Sponsor: American Academy of Cosmetic Surgeons
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Date: Jan 27, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $1,555.00
source

Destination: SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA
Sponsor: Diversified Collection Services Inc
Purpose: FACT-FINDING AND TOUR OF FACILITY
Date: Mar 17, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $4,165.00
source

Destination: CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Sponsor: MEDICAL INTERVENTIONS FOR AUTISM
Purpose: GUEST SPEAKER
Date: Apr 9, 2000
Expense: $337.00
source

Destination: LAS VEGAS, NV
Sponsor: NATIONAL NUTRITIONAL FOODS ASSOCIATION
Purpose: KEYNOTE ADDRESS TO CONVENTION
Date: Jun 27, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $4,079.50
source

Destination: CHICAGO ILLINOIS
Sponsor: Cancer Treatment Centers of America
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEECH
Date: Oct 9, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $7,460.00
source

Destination: TAIWAN
Sponsor: Chinese International Economic Cooperation Association
Purpose: OFFICIAL VISIT W/ PRES./AM. INSTITUTE & GOVERNMENT BUSINESS LEADER.
Date: Dec 6, 2003 (12 days)
Expense: $7,250.00
source

Destination: TAIPEI, TAIWAN
Sponsor: Chinese International Economic Cooperation Association
Purpose: FACT-FINDING AND EDUCATIONAL VISIT
Date: Oct 19, 2004 (9 days)
Expense: $5,750.00
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Dan Burton

Heather Bailey
Kevin Binger
David Burian
J Vincent Chase
Jonathan Dilley
Garry Ewing
Brian Fauls
Dan Getz
Lawrence Halloran
Barbara Kahlow
Randall Kaplan
Caroline Katzin
Claudia Keller
Connie Lausten
Marlo Lewis
Toni Lightle
Kevin Long
Gloria Markus
Diane Menorca
Daniel Moll
Bill O'neill
R Nicholas Palarino
Kimberly Reed
George Rogers
Stephen Schatz
Dan Skopec
Brenda Summers
Robert Taub
Mary Udovich
Mary Valentino
Mark Walker
William Waller
Nathaniel Wienecke
Corinne Zaccagnini



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.