American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

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American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.

Back to The Data

Office of

Dan Burton


Total cost of 79 office trips: $184,971.00


Trips by Dan Burton
Total cost of congressperson's 7 trips: $30,596.50

Destination: ORLANDO, FLORIDA
Sponsor: American Academy of Cosmetic Surgeons
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER
Date: Jan 27, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $1,555.00
source

Destination: SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA
Sponsor: Diversified Collection Services Inc
Purpose: FACT-FINDING AND TOUR OF FACILITY
Date: Mar 17, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $4,165.00
source

Destination: CHICAGO, ILLINOIS
Sponsor: MEDICAL INTERVENTIONS FOR AUTISM
Purpose: GUEST SPEAKER
Date: Apr 9, 2000
Expense: $337.00
source

Destination: LAS VEGAS, NV
Sponsor: NATIONAL NUTRITIONAL FOODS ASSOCIATION
Purpose: KEYNOTE ADDRESS TO CONVENTION
Date: Jun 27, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $4,079.50
source

Destination: CHICAGO ILLINOIS
Sponsor: Cancer Treatment Centers of America
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEECH
Date: Oct 9, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $7,460.00
source

Destination: TAIWAN
Sponsor: Chinese International Economic Cooperation Association
Purpose: OFFICIAL VISIT W/ PRES./AM. INSTITUTE & GOVERNMENT BUSINESS LEADER.
Date: Dec 6, 2003 (12 days)
Expense: $7,250.00
source

Destination: TAIPEI, TAIWAN
Sponsor: Chinese International Economic Cooperation Association
Purpose: FACT-FINDING AND EDUCATIONAL VISIT
Date: Oct 19, 2004 (9 days)
Expense: $5,750.00
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Dan Burton

Heather Bailey
Kevin Binger
David Burian
J Vincent Chase
Jonathan Dilley
Garry Ewing
Brian Fauls
Dan Getz
Lawrence Halloran
Barbara Kahlow
Randall Kaplan
Caroline Katzin
Claudia Keller
Connie Lausten
Marlo Lewis
Toni Lightle
Kevin Long
Gloria Markus
Diane Menorca
Daniel Moll
Bill O'neill
R Nicholas Palarino
Kimberly Reed
George Rogers
Stephen Schatz
Dan Skopec
Brenda Summers
Robert Taub
Mary Udovich
Mary Valentino
Mark Walker
William Waller
Nathaniel Wienecke
Corinne Zaccagnini



American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.12.14

    Tracking and vocational ed

    Jeannie Oakes, who has studied tracking for decades, says vocational ed and "tracking" are connected, and that sorting students by race and class is still a problem.
  • 08.04.14

    Reinventing college for a new kind of student

    Long-predicted demographic changes mean a new kind of student is figuring out where to go to college, and how to pay for it.
  • 07.29.14

    Is school funding fair?

    A new report looks at why some schools have a lot of money to spend per pupil, while others don't, and what to do about it.