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A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Office of

Richard Durbin


Total cost of 58 office trips: $184,051.25


Trips by Richard Durbin
Total cost of congressperson's 14 trips: $99,436.97

Destination: SPRINGFIELD, ILLINOIS; GRAND CAYMAN ISLAND AND RETURN
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON US POLICY TOWARD CUBA (MEMBER AND SPOUSE)
Date: Apr 17, 2000 (5 days)
Expense: $6,842.60
source

Destination: CHICAGO; MIAMI; WASHINGTON DC
Sponsor: American Israel Public Affairs Committee and affiliates
Purpose: SPEAK TO SOUTH DADE COUNTY AIPAC ORGANIZATION
Date: May 15, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $1,519.50
source

Destination: WASHINGTON, DC
Sponsor: General Electric Co
Purpose: APPEAR ON MEET THE PRESS
Date: Sep 17, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $9,550.00
source

Destination: SAN JUAN
Sponsor: Council on Foreign Relations
Purpose: ATTEND CHICAGO COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS 2000 ATLANTIC CONFERENCE
Date: Nov 9, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $2,282.55
source

Destination: LITHUANIA; FLORENCE, ITALY
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN CONFERENCE ON THE CONVERGENCES OF U.S. NATIONAL SECURITY AND THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT
Date: May 29, 2001 (5 days)
Expense: $8,673.90
source

Destination: NEW YORK TO MIDDLE EAST-TEL AVIV, BERLIN, LEBANON, SYRIA, ISRAEL
Sponsor: Center for Middle East Peace & Economic Cooperation
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Jan 5, 2002 (7 days)
Expense: $6,284.60
source

Destination: RIO DE JANEIRO
Sponsor: Council on Foreign Relations
Purpose: ATTEND THE ATLANTIC CONFERENCE
Date: Nov 20, 2002 (4 days)
Expense: $14,461.00
source

Destination: NY TO ROME ITALY
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN CONFERENCE ON THE GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT. EXPENSES ARE FOR SENATOR AND HIS DAUGHTER, JENNIFER
Date: May 26, 2003 (6 days)
Expense: $8,398.20
source

Destination: ALASKA
Sponsor: Alaska Wilderness League
Purpose: TO VIEW THE WILDERNESS AND OIL FIELDS IN ALASKA
Date: Aug 5, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $4,104.00
source

Destination: MOSCOW, RUSSIA
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON U.S.-RUSSIAN RELATIONS
Date: Aug 10, 2003 (6 days)
Expense: $8,628.00
source

Destination: HONOLULU, HAWAII
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON U.S.-CHINA RELATIONS
Date: Jan 5, 2004 (6 days)
Expense: $9,516.02
source

Destination: INDIA AND BANGLADESH
Sponsor: Results Educational Fund
Purpose: VISITS TO TUBERCULOSIS TESTING AND TREATMENT, COMMUNITY HEALTH, AIDS AND MICROCREDIT PROGRAM SITES
Date: Feb 13, 2004 (8 days)
Expense: $8,800.00
source

Destination: VENICE, ITALY
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: TO PARTICIPATE IN A CONFERENCE ON U.S.-RUSSIAN-EUROPE RELATIONS
Date: Aug 22, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $9,208.60
source

Destination: CAPE TOWN, SOUTH AFRICA
Sponsor: CHICAGO COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS/SOUTH AFRICAN INSTITUTE OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
Purpose: CONFERENCE ON INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS AND FACT FINDING TRIP
Date: Nov 9, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $1,168.00
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Richard Durbin

Sally Brown-Shaklee
Dan Cisek
Krista Donahue
Susan Gallagher
Ed Greelegs
Susan Hardesty
Ann Hwang
Nancy Kohn
Jessica Lenard
Elissa Levin
David Lieber
Anne Marie Murphy
Lynh Nguyen
Jessica Porras
David Sarokin
Darla Silva
Shannon Smith
Patrick Souders
Anne Steckel
William Weber
James Williams



American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.