American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.

Back to The Data

Office of

Michael Honda


Total cost of 43 office trips: $55,677.34


Trips by Michael Honda
Total cost of congressperson's 22 trips: $21,942.08

Destination:
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: 2001 BIPARTISAN CONGRESSIONAL RETREAT
Date: Mar 9, 2001 (1 day)
Expense: $393.00
source

Destination: BEIJING, SHANGHAI AND JIANGSU PROVINCE, CHINA
Sponsor: CALIFORNIA STATE FRIENDSHIP COMMITTEE, JIANGSU INSTITUTE OF INT'L RELATIONS AND CHINESE PEOPLE INSTITUTE OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS
Purpose: FACT FINDING IN REGARD TO TRADE AND U.S. HIGH TECH BUSINESSES
Date: Aug 4, 2001 (8 days)
Expense: $3,026.00
source

Destination:
Sponsor: American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee
Purpose: KEYNOTE ADL 2003 AWARDS RECEPTION/DINNER IN DEARBORN, MI
Date: Apr 25, 2003
Expense: $842.26
source

Destination:
Sponsor: ORGANIZATION OF CHINESE AMERICANS
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAK AT OCA 2003 BANQUET ON COLUMBUS, OH
Date: Apr 26, 2003
Expense: $792.67
source

Destination: SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO
Sponsor: Sony Corporation
Purpose: TRI-CAUCUS RETREAT IN SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO
Date: Oct 23, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $1,709.22
source

Destination: NEW YORK
Sponsor: SAIWOMEN
Purpose: ATTEND OCA GALA DINNER ON TARRYTOWN, NY AND GUEST AT A BREAKFAST ON MAN NOTE: MEET AND GREET
Date: Oct 31, 2003
Expense: $137.67
source

Destination: BOSTON
Sponsor: Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Purpose: SPEAK AS A PANELIST AT A FORUM
Date: Nov 1, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $272.00
source

Destination: SEOUL, KOREA
Sponsor: Korea-United States Exchange Council
Purpose: FAMILIARIZATION TRIP TO KOREA, DMZ
Date: Nov 30, 2003
Expense: $900.00
source

Destination: TOKYO, DISTRICT TR TO KUMA
Sponsor: George Washington University
Purpose: LEGISLATIVE EXCHANGE & MEETING WITH JAPANESE DIET MEMBERS TO DISCUSS ISSUES OF CONCERN TO BOTH NATIONS
Date: Dec 2, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $1,394.42
source

Destination: SEATTLE, WASHINGTON
Sponsor: Microsoft Corporation
Purpose: TO DO A PLANT TOUR OF MICROSOFT FACILITY AD MEET WITH CEO OF STARBUCKS
Date: Dec 11, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $1,234.79
source

Destination: VAIL, COLORADO
Sponsor: DCCC/MIKE HONDA FOR CONGRESS
Purpose:
Date: Jan 7, 2004 (3 days)
Expense: $3,008.46
source

Destination: DULLES TO LAX
Sponsor: Committee of 100
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Apr 2, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $722.02
source

Destination: JAKARTA
Sponsor: Carter Center
Purpose:
Date: Jun 30, 2004 (8 days)
Expense: $246.00
source

Destination: MIAMI, FL
Sponsor: American Legacy Foundation
Purpose: CONDUCT TRI-CAUCUS HEALTH FORUM IN MIAMI, FLD.
Date: Jul 9, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $892.94
source

Destination: BIRMINGHAM, MONTGOMERY, & SELMA, ALABAMA
Sponsor: THE FAITH & POLITICS INSTITUTE; ADDITIONAL $500.00 WAS PAID BY MIKE HONDA FOR CONGRESS
Purpose: 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE VOTING RIGHTS MARCH, PILGRIMAGE TO HISTORIC SITES OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT IN ALABAMA
Date: Mar 4, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $925.00
source

Destination: PHILADELPHIA
Sponsor: JAPANESE AMERICAN CITIZENS LEAGUE
Purpose: CONGRESSMAN HONDA WAS KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT THEIR ANNUAL BANQUET ON MARCH 19TH
Date: Mar 19, 2005
Expense: $91.79
source

Destination: LOS ANGELES, CA
Sponsor: Japanese American Bar Association
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT JAPANESE AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION (JABA) 2005 INSTALLATION DINNER IN LOS ANGELES, CA ON 3/25/05
Date: Mar 25, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $560.02
source

Destination: ANAHEIM, CA
Sponsor: American Federation of Teachers (AFT)
Purpose: CONGRESSMAN HONDA WAS THE KEYNOTE SPEAKER FOR THEIR 28TH ANNUAL PARAPROFESSIONAL AND SCHOOL RELATED PERSONNEL (PSRP) CONFERENCE LUNCHEON IN ANAHEIM, CA
Date: Apr 2, 2005
Expense: $543.90
source

Destination: WASHINGTON, DC-ATLANTA, GA-SAN JOSE, CA
Sponsor: Asian American Heritage Foundation
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAK AT ASIAN AMERICAN HERITAGE FOUNDATION 4TH ANNUAL GALA DINNER, MAY 12, 2005
Date: May 12, 2005
Expense: $403.20
source

Destination: ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA
Sponsor: Ethiopian North American Health Professionals Association
Purpose: KEYNOTE AT APPRECIATION DINNER AS CHAIR OF CONG. ETHIOPHIAN CAUCUS; VISIT MATERNAL-CHILD HEALTH CARE CLINIC, HIV/AIDS CLINIC AND COMMUNITY PROGRAM, AND FISTULA HOSPITAL
Date: May 31, 2005 (8 days)
Expense: $2,162.15
source

Destination: SAN ANTONIO, TX-SALT LAKE CITY, UT-SAN JOSE, CA
Sponsor: NATIONAL JAPANESE AMERICAN CITIZENS LEAGUE
Purpose: KEYNOTE SPEAKER AT NATIONAL JACL YOUTH/STUDENT CONFERENCE VISION AWARD BANQUET IN SALT LAKE CITY, UT
Date: Jun 25, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $483.91
source

Destination: CHICAGO, IL
Sponsor: AMERICAN LEGACY FOUNDATION, COALITION TO PROMOTE MINORITY HEALTH
Purpose: MINORITY HEALTH SUMMIT IN CHICAGO, IL; CONGRESSMAN HONDA ATTENDED AS CHAIR OF THE CONGRESSIONAL ASIAN PACIFIC AMERICAN CAUCUS
Date: Jul 22, 2005 (2 days)
Expense: $1,200.66
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of Michael Honda

Matt Bostic
Jennifer Escobar
Emily Ihara
Elizabeth Lee
Meri Maben
Christopher Mitchell
Bob Sakaniwa
Victoria Tung
Jennifer Van Der Heide
Eric Werwa



American RadioWorks |
boots-to-books

From Boots to Books

The longest war in American history is drawing to a close. Now, the men and women who served are coming home, and many hope to use higher education to build new, better lives. They have help from the Post-9/11 GI Bill, a piece of legislation that many advocates say offers more support to returning veterans than any policy since the original GI Bill of 1944. In this documentary, we explore how the first GI Bill revolutionized the lives of millions of young veterans, America’s institutions of higher education, and American society at large. But America’s economic and academic systems have changed, and veterans today are returning to a very different reality than their predecessors.

Recent Posts

  • 09.03.15

    The history of the GI Bill

    A staggering 16 million soldiers returned home from World War II, and millions of them went to school. Because GI Bill benefits were generous enough to pay for any college in the country, veterans flooded all types of institutions, from elite schools like Harvard to large state schools, to vocational schools. By 1947, half of all college students in America were veterans.
  • 09.03.15

    The front lines of the long journey home

    Colleges and universities have become the front lines of one of the great challenges posed by war: how to reintegrate the people who've served.
  • 09.03.15

    The GI Bill: One of the last great economic ladders?

    The Post-9/11 GI Bill was supposed to change where veterans could go to college by giving them more money, and, therefore, more options. But since the new bill went into effect in 2009, the percentage of veterans enrolling at four-year public and private nonprofit schools has barely budged.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.