American RadioWorks |
Josipa Roksa and Richard Arum, co-authors of Aspiring Adults Adrift. (Photo:  Social Science Research Council)

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can't find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

American RadioWorks |
Josipa Roksa and Richard Arum, co-authors of Aspiring Adults Adrift. (Photo:  Social Science Research Council)

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can't find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.

Back to The Data

Office of

John Linder


Total cost of 35 office trips: $130,101.96


Trips by John Linder
Total cost of congressperson's 17 trips: $91,198.29

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: Americans For Fair Taxation Inc
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Jan 30, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $1,030.13
source

Destination: BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS
Sponsor: Americans For Fair Taxation Inc
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Mar 30, 2000 (1 day)
Expense: $861.64
source

Destination: VIENNA
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: FACT FINDING
Date: Nov 15, 2002 (8 days)
Expense: $10,292.24
source

Destination: PORTLAND, OREGON
Sponsor: AMERICAN SPIRIT FUND
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Jun 12, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $1,367.40
source

Destination: SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS
Sponsor: American Farm Bureau Federation and affiliates
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Jun 28, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $2,023.00
source

Destination: LONDON, ENGLAND
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: FACT FINDING TRIP
Date: Aug 10, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $18,784.69
source

Destination: ATLANTA-DES MOINES, IOWA
Sponsor: American Farm Bureau Federation and affiliates
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Dec 3, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $909.88
source

Destination: TRAVERSE CITY, MICHIGAN-ATLANTA
Sponsor: American Farm Bureau Federation and affiliates
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Dec 4, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $853.00
source

Destination: JACKSON, MS
Sponsor: American Farm Bureau Federation and affiliates
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Dec 6, 2003
Expense: $655.00
source

Destination: ISRAEL-JORDAN
Sponsor: Jerusalem Fund for Education & Community Development
Purpose: TO STRENGTHEN INTERNATIONAL UNDERSTANDING WHILE PROMOTING STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS & JOINT VENTURES DEFENSE AEROSPACE HOMELAND SECURITY MISSION OF PEACE
Date: Jan 10, 2004 (5 days)
Expense: $19,650.00
source

Destination: ATLANTA-WEST PALM BEACH, FLORIDA-WASHINGTON, DC
Sponsor: Chamber of Commerce for the USA
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Feb 23, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $1,681.00
source

Destination: FRANKFURT, BUDAPEST
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: FACT-FINDING
Date: Nov 6, 2004 (6 days)
Expense: $9,217.31
source

Destination: KEY BISCAYNE, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Jan 12, 2005 (3 days)
Expense: $2,654.20
source

Destination: SARASOTA, FLORIDA
Sponsor: NATIONAL SMALL BUSINESS ASSOCIATION
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Feb 11, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $951.80
source

Destination: QUEENSTOWN, MD
Sponsor: Public Governance Institute
Purpose: TO EXAMINE ISSUES RELEVANT TO THE COMMITTEE'S RESPONSIBILITIES, AND IN THE PROCESS, IMPROVE THE WORKING ENVIRONMENT & WORKING RELATIONSHIP AMONG ITS MEMBERS
Date: Mar 7, 2005 (1 day)
Expense: $404.00
source

Destination: ATL-HOU-IAD
Sponsor: Tax Leadership Council
Purpose: TO SPEAK TO THE EXECUTIVE BOARD & ITS SUPPORTERS ABOUT THE PROSPECT FOR TAX REFORM IN THE 109TH CONGRESS
Date: Apr 11, 2005
Expense: $9,000.00
source

Destination: ATLANTA, GEORGIA-DENVER, COLORADO-WASHINGTON, D.C.
Sponsor: Americans For Fair Taxation Inc
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT
Date: Jul 25, 2005
Expense: $10,863.00
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of John Linder

Jennifer Coxe
William Evans
Scott Haggard
Kimberly Herb
Gretchen Learman
Henry Plaster
Julie Schmidt
Michael Swansburg
Rob Woodall
William Woodall



American RadioWorks |
Josipa Roksa and Richard Arum, co-authors of Aspiring Adults Adrift. (Photo:  Social Science Research Council)

Ed researchers: Colleges can do more for students, especially in a bad economy

College is worth the investment. College graduates can't find good jobs. Student loan debt keeps rising, and now tops a trillion dollars. What can be done?

Recent Posts

  • 09.17.14

    A company short on skilled workers creates its own college-degree program

    At a Toyota plant in Kentucky, young people are learning how to fix robots, earning associate's degrees and graduating with jobs that pay up to $80,000 a year.
  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.