American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

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  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

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    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
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    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.

Back to The Data

Office of

E. Clay Shaw


Total cost of 37 office trips: $64,509.60


Trips by E. Clay Shaw
Total cost of congressperson's 14 trips: $26,084.14

Destination: LAS VEGAS, NV AND CAREFREE, AZ
Sponsor: CONSUMER ELECTRONICS ASSOC. & LARGE PUBLIC POWER COUNCIL
Purpose: FACT FINDING MISSION RE: TAX
Date: Jan 6, 2000 (3 days)
Expense: $0.00
source

Destination: TZANEEN, SO. AFRICA-JOHANNESBURG-NAMIBIA
Sponsor: WILD Foundation
Purpose: FACT FINDING MISSION TO INCLUDE ENVIRONMENT, NATURAL RESOURCE PRIORITIES AND FOREIGN POLICY
Date: Jul 1, 2000 (9 days)
Expense: $0.00
source

Destination: ROME, ITALY
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: FACT FINDING AND TO SPEAK ON TRADE IMPLICATIONS OF SOCIAL POLICY PENSION REFORM
Date: Nov 24, 2000 (7 days)
Expense: $5,895.60
source

Destination: ZURICH, SWITZERLAND
Sponsor: Center for Strategic and International Studies
Purpose: HEAD AMERICAN DELEGATION TO THE COMMISSION ON GLOBAL AGING'S 2ND PLENARY MEETING
Date: Jan 22, 2001 (4 days)
Expense: $0.00
source

Destination: GREENBRIER, WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, WV
Sponsor: Aspen Institute
Purpose: BIPARTISAN CONGRESSIONAL RETREAT
Date: Mar 9, 2001 (2 days)
Expense: $1,454.00
source

Destination: EDINBURGH, SCOTLAND
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: MEETING OF BUSINESS & GOVERNMENT LEADERS TO DISCUSS PUBLIC POLICY ISSUES THAT AFFECT RELATIONS BETWEEN U.S. AND SCOTLAND
Date: Aug 10, 2001 (7 days)
Expense: $5,105.00
source

Destination: BOCA RATON, FL
Sponsor: CHICAGO MERCANTILE EXCHANGE/CHICAGO BOARD OF TRADE
Purpose: PARTICIPATE IN FUTURES INDUSTRY ASSOC.'S CONFERENCE - "WASHINGTON OUTLOOK"
Date: Mar 16, 2002
Expense: $510.82
source

Destination: MALAGA, SPAIN
Sponsor: Transatlantic Policy Network
Purpose: DISCUSS TRANSATLANTIC RELATIONS AND PROMOTE TRANSATLANTIC PARTNER THROUGH MEMBER (OF CONGRESS) TO MEMBER (OF EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT) DIALOGUE
Date: Apr 11, 2003 (4 days)
Expense: $0.00
source

Destination: NEW YORK CITY
Sponsor: Republican Main Street Partnership
Purpose: CONFERENCE TO SHARE IDEAS
Date: Jun 21, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $1,709.00
source

Destination: WASHINGTON, DC TO SHANNON, IRELAND TO LONDON, ENGLAND
Sponsor: Century Business Services Inc
Purpose: INTERNATIONAL TRADE SYMPOSIUM
Date: Aug 3, 2003 (7 days)
Expense: $5,464.84
source

Destination: LONDON, ENGLAND TO FT. LAUDERDALE, FL
Sponsor: Ripon Society and Ripon Educational Fund
Purpose: TO MEET WITH GOVERNMENT AND BUSINESS LEADERS TO DISCUSS PUBLIC POLICY ISSUES THAT AFFECT RELATIONS BETWEEN THE U.S. AND GREAT BRITIAN
Date: Aug 10, 2003 (5 days)
Expense: $5,944.88
source

Destination: NAPLES, FL
Sponsor: Clark Consulting
Purpose: GUEST SPEAKER AT 2003 CLIENT RETREAT - RE: WAYS & MEANS COMMITTEE BUSINESS
Date: Oct 24, 2003 (2 days)
Expense: $0.00
source

Destination: CONGRESSIONAL SPORTSMEN'S FOUNDATION CAUCUS LEADERSHIP MEETING
Sponsor: Congressional Sportsmens Foundation
Purpose: TO BRING LEADERS FROM OUTDOOR INDUSTRY & CONSERVATION ORGANIZATIONS TOGETHER TO DISCUSS ISSUES FACING AMERICA'S SPORTING TRADITIONS.
Date: Mar 20, 2004 (1 day)
Expense: $0.00
source

Destination: TANZANIA
Sponsor: AFRICAN WILDLIFE FOUNDATION
Purpose: STUDY OF CONSERVATION IN TAU
Date: Jun 26, 2004 (10 days)
Expense: $0.00
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of E. Clay Shaw

Bob Castro
Chad Davis
Eric Eikenberg
Tanner Gilreath
Michael Harrington
Christine Pollack
Michael Sewell



American RadioWorks |
Image: Wikipedia (public domain)

Can how you move change how you think?

Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?

Recent Posts

  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.
  • 04.22.15

    The First Gen Movement

    Over the past decade many elite colleges have taken great strides to admit low-income students, but there are unanticipated financial and cultural barriers to fitting in on campus that can’t easily be solved by merely giving students a foot in the door. Questions of class differences have spurred a nationwide movement of “first generation” student clubs on college campuses.