American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.

Back to The Data

Office of

George Allen


Total cost of 68 office trips: $131,970.66


Trips by George Allen
Total cost of congressperson's 7 trips: $12,361.11

Destination: NORFOLK, VIRGINIA
Sponsor: LM SANDLER & SONS INC
Purpose: SPEECH TO CONGREGATION BETH EL
Date: Nov 26, 2001
Expense: $1,725.00
source

Destination: WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, WEST VIRGINIA
Sponsor: CSX Corporation
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT AS PART OF
Date: May 25, 2002 (3 days)
Expense: $1,147.20
source

Destination: NAPLES, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Wyeth
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT AT ANNUAL MEETING FOR PHRMA AND PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY REPRESENTATIVES. MRS. ALLEN ACCOMPANIED SENATOR ALLEN ON THIS TRIP. HER EXPENSES ARE INCLUDED IN THE TOTALS
Date: Mar 27, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $1,622.60
source

Destination: NAPLES, FLORIDA
Sponsor: Pharmaceutical Research & Manufacturers of America (PHRMA)
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT AT ANNUAL MEETING FOR PHRMA AND PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY REPRESENTATIVES. MRS. ALLEN ACCOMPANIED SENATOR ALLEN ON THIS TRIP. HER EXPENSES ARE INCLUDED IN THE TOTALS
Date: Mar 27, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $911.75
source

Destination: NAPLES, FL
Sponsor: NASDAQ
Purpose: SPEAKING ENGAGEMENT AT NASDAQ LEADERSHIP SUMMIT, A DIALOGUE BETWEEN LEADERS AND GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS. MRS. ALLEN ACCOMPANIED SENATOR ALLEN ON THIS TRIP. HER EXPENSES ARE INCLUDED IN THE TOTALS. THERE IS AN AMENDMENT TO LODGING, CHANGED FROM ORIG. $3,842.
Date: Mar 28, 2003 (3 days)
Expense: $5,327.34
source

Destination: MIDDLEBURG, VIRGINIA
Sponsor: Congressional Institute Inc
Purpose: SENATE LEADERSHIP RETREAT
Date: Dec 1, 2003 (1 day)
Expense: $705.00
source

Destination: LAS VEGAS, NV
Sponsor: Consumer Electronics Association
Purpose: ATTEND CONSUMER ELECTRONICS LEADERS IN TECHNOLOGY TRADE SHOW
Date: Jan 9, 2004 (2 days)
Expense: $922.22
source


Congressional staff traveling under the office of George Allen

Frank Cavaliere
Teresa Deroco
Kristin Elder
Ron Ivey
Kelly Kolb
Brent Perry
John Reid
Erin Sammons
Conrad Schelle
Stephen Taylor
Michael Thomas
Jay Timmons
Robert Turner
Paul Unger
Tucker Watkins



American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
science-smart

The Science of Smart

Researchers have long been searching for better ways to learn. In recent decades, experts working in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience have opened new windows into how the brain works, and how we can learn to learn better. In this program, we look at some of the big ideas coming out of brain science. We meet the researchers who are unlocking the secrets of how the brain acquires and holds on to knowledge. And we introduce listeners to the teachers and students who are trying to apply that knowledge in the real world.

Recent Posts

  • 08.20.14

    Variation is key to deeper learning

    Humans obviously learn a lot of things through trial-and-error. A level of "desirable difficulty" built into a learning and exam process appears to boost the overall retention of new skills or knowledge.
  • 08.19.14

    Learning to love tests

    If there's consensus on anything in education, it's this: Tests are awful. But maybe we've been thinking about tests all wrong. Research shows that tests can actually be powerful tools for learning -- but only if teachers use them right.
  • 08.19.14

    Paul Tough on how children succeed

    Paul Tough talks about his new book, How Children Succeed. He says it's character that matters when it comes to learning. Children need curiosity, optimism and self-control.
  • 08.18.14

    This is your brain on language

    For decades psychologists cautioned against raising children bilingual. They warned parents and teachers that learning a second language as a child was bad for brain development. But recent studies have found exactly the opposite.