American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Breaking the Cycle of Poverty Now

File under: education, health, job training, civil rights, welfare

0 (0 votes)

From: Don K., San Antonio, TX

Just like any thing worth doing all of us have to make a commitment to it.

Currently in America we assume some one else will do it, than believe that it is actually happening. Usually it is left to the government which we love to hate so much, or some other organization.

I believe Hillary Clinton when she says, 'it takes a village to raise a child'. This really holds true today,when we see so many children in a state of need and abandonment.

Ending poverty begins with one child at a time. First we have to make certain that every child that is conceived, and is wanted, is protected. Too many believe that our obligations end once the child is born,in fact it is only beginning.

The prospective mother must have the support, first from conception to birth, with proper education, prenatal care, and nutrition.

Secondly, once the child is born to support him or her, by offering the parent quality daycare for the child, and protection from the worldly ills.

Twenty four hour centers need to be open and available.

Thirdly, to follow the child through High School, providing all the support necessary to help him and her along the way.

Money is important, but is only a part of the solution, community involvement is the most important.

If we can convince each other that the welfare of our children is the most important effort we can make,than we can make great strides against poverty.

All of us who have "made it" have an obligation, to give back. We do this by acting as surrogates,mentors, and advocates. These efforts do not take money, only time and a passion to impact a life in a positive way.

We have to decide as a civil society whether,the path we have chosen to take is working. In fact, we know it is not. How can we be be satisfied with discarding beautiful lives to the penal system. The cost to us is monumental, not only in terms of money, but in the lose of human capital.

I personally have committed myself to community service. I believe that a purposeful life is well lived. Touching lives through active involvement, is the only way to make a difference. Caring, sharing, and, loving.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
A student learns welding at a vocational high school in Massachusetts. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Ready to Work

Vocational education was once a staple of American schooling, preparing some kids for blue-collar futures while others were put on a path to college. Today the new mantra is "college for all." But not everyone wants to go to college, and more than half of jobs don't require a bachelor's degree. Many experts say it's time to bring back career and technical education. This American RadioWorks documentary explores how vocational education is being reimagined.

Recent Posts

  • 09.11.14

    A 21st-century vocational high school

    For years, vocational education was seen as a lesser form of schooling, tracking some kids into programs that ended up limiting their future opportunities. Today, in the nation's best vocational programs, things are different.
  • 09.10.14

    Career academies: A new twist on vocational ed

    Across the country, thousands of high schools are transforming into career academies. The idea is that students will be more engaged if they see how academics are connected to the world of work. And they’ll be more likely to get the postsecondary schooling they need to support themselves in today’s economy.
  • 09.09.14

    The troubled history of vocational education

    Vocational education was once used to track low-income students off to work while wealthier kids went to college. But advocates for today's career and technical education say things have changed, and graduates of vocational programs may have the advantage over graduates of traditional high schools.
  • 09.04.14

    Four-year institutions brace for population shifts

    Colleges and universities are accepting many more students of color, many more students from working class and poor families, and many more people who are sometimes referred to as "nontraditional" students.