American RadioWorks |
President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

Goodbye, College Ratings (For Now)

The Obama administration recently declared that it would no longer pursue a college ratings system based on accessibility, affordability and student success. And college presidents everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

Recent Posts

  • 07.23.15

    Sweet Briar Returns

    Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.
  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Breaking the Cycle of Poverty Now

File under: education, health, job training, civil rights, welfare

0 (0 votes)

From: Don K., San Antonio, TX

Just like any thing worth doing all of us have to make a commitment to it.

Currently in America we assume some one else will do it, than believe that it is actually happening. Usually it is left to the government which we love to hate so much, or some other organization.

I believe Hillary Clinton when she says, 'it takes a village to raise a child'. This really holds true today,when we see so many children in a state of need and abandonment.

Ending poverty begins with one child at a time. First we have to make certain that every child that is conceived, and is wanted, is protected. Too many believe that our obligations end once the child is born,in fact it is only beginning.

The prospective mother must have the support, first from conception to birth, with proper education, prenatal care, and nutrition.

Secondly, once the child is born to support him or her, by offering the parent quality daycare for the child, and protection from the worldly ills.

Twenty four hour centers need to be open and available.

Thirdly, to follow the child through High School, providing all the support necessary to help him and her along the way.

Money is important, but is only a part of the solution, community involvement is the most important.

If we can convince each other that the welfare of our children is the most important effort we can make,than we can make great strides against poverty.

All of us who have "made it" have an obligation, to give back. We do this by acting as surrogates,mentors, and advocates. These efforts do not take money, only time and a passion to impact a life in a positive way.

We have to decide as a civil society whether,the path we have chosen to take is working. In fact, we know it is not. How can we be be satisfied with discarding beautiful lives to the penal system. The cost to us is monumental, not only in terms of money, but in the lose of human capital.

I personally have committed myself to community service. I believe that a purposeful life is well lived. Touching lives through active involvement, is the only way to make a difference. Caring, sharing, and, loving.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)President Barack Obama delivers remarks at Henninger High School in Syracuse, New York, during the college affordability bus tour, Aug. 22, 2013. (Official White House Photo by Chuck Kennedy)

Goodbye, College Ratings (For Now)

The Obama administration recently declared that it would no longer pursue a college ratings system based on accessibility, affordability and student success. And college presidents everywhere breathed a sigh of relief.

Recent Posts

  • 07.23.15

    Sweet Briar Returns

    Sweet Briar College was about to close after struggling with dwindling enrollment and other problems. An alumni group raised more than 20 million dollars in pledges to keep the doors open, but the school's survival is still deeply in doubt.
  • 07.15.15

    The Future of Historically Black Colleges

    Historically Black Colleges and Universities proliferated throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when many white schools refused to admit African Americans, especially in the South. Our guest this week feels HBCUs still serve a crucial role in higher education.
  • 07.07.15

    Talking About Race in Schools

    Over the past year, race relations have dominated the news cycle. This can bring up difficult questions, especially for parents and teachers. Our guest Yolanda Moses says Americans need to find more ways to talk about race in schools.
  • 07.02.15

    Minorities and Special Ed

    For years policy makers believed that minorities were overrepresented in special education and that there was inherent bias in the way kids were being identified as disabled. A new study turns this idea on its head.