American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Breaking the Cycle of Poverty Now

File under: education, health, job training, civil rights, welfare

0 (0 votes)

From: Don K., San Antonio, TX

Just like any thing worth doing all of us have to make a commitment to it.

Currently in America we assume some one else will do it, than believe that it is actually happening. Usually it is left to the government which we love to hate so much, or some other organization.

I believe Hillary Clinton when she says, 'it takes a village to raise a child'. This really holds true today,when we see so many children in a state of need and abandonment.

Ending poverty begins with one child at a time. First we have to make certain that every child that is conceived, and is wanted, is protected. Too many believe that our obligations end once the child is born,in fact it is only beginning.

The prospective mother must have the support, first from conception to birth, with proper education, prenatal care, and nutrition.

Secondly, once the child is born to support him or her, by offering the parent quality daycare for the child, and protection from the worldly ills.

Twenty four hour centers need to be open and available.

Thirdly, to follow the child through High School, providing all the support necessary to help him and her along the way.

Money is important, but is only a part of the solution, community involvement is the most important.

If we can convince each other that the welfare of our children is the most important effort we can make,than we can make great strides against poverty.

All of us who have "made it" have an obligation, to give back. We do this by acting as surrogates,mentors, and advocates. These efforts do not take money, only time and a passion to impact a life in a positive way.

We have to decide as a civil society whether,the path we have chosen to take is working. In fact, we know it is not. How can we be be satisfied with discarding beautiful lives to the penal system. The cost to us is monumental, not only in terms of money, but in the lose of human capital.

I personally have committed myself to community service. I believe that a purposeful life is well lived. Touching lives through active involvement, is the only way to make a difference. Caring, sharing, and, loving.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.