American RadioWorks |
Protesters at Seattle University on Feb. 25. Photo: SEIU Local 925 via Flickr

Adjunct voices

Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.

Recent Posts

  • 02.25.15

    Adjuncts Unite

    What would higher education look like without adjunct professors? That’s what a grass-roots group of academics is trying to prove by holding a National Adjunct Walk-out Day on February 25.
  • 02.19.15

    To Test or Not to Test?

    Sometime in the next few weeks, Senate Republicans and Democrats will vote to reauthorize The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. On the podcast this week, we talk to two education advocates who differ on how and when we should test our kids.
  • 02.11.15

    Looking back: An Imperfect Revolution

    In June 2007, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down school desegregation plans that look at students’ race. This week on the podcast, we’re featuring our 2007 documentary, “An Imperfect Revolution: Voices from the Desegregation Era,"
  • 02.04.15

    Are HBCUs the Key to Producing More African American Physicians?

    We talk to a Dallas doctor who thinks HBCUs may be the best pathways for African Americans interested in careers in medicine.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Breaking the Cycle of Poverty Now

File under: education, health, job training, civil rights, welfare

0 (0 votes)

From: Don K., San Antonio, TX

Just like any thing worth doing all of us have to make a commitment to it.

Currently in America we assume some one else will do it, than believe that it is actually happening. Usually it is left to the government which we love to hate so much, or some other organization.

I believe Hillary Clinton when she says, 'it takes a village to raise a child'. This really holds true today,when we see so many children in a state of need and abandonment.

Ending poverty begins with one child at a time. First we have to make certain that every child that is conceived, and is wanted, is protected. Too many believe that our obligations end once the child is born,in fact it is only beginning.

The prospective mother must have the support, first from conception to birth, with proper education, prenatal care, and nutrition.

Secondly, once the child is born to support him or her, by offering the parent quality daycare for the child, and protection from the worldly ills.

Twenty four hour centers need to be open and available.

Thirdly, to follow the child through High School, providing all the support necessary to help him and her along the way.

Money is important, but is only a part of the solution, community involvement is the most important.

If we can convince each other that the welfare of our children is the most important effort we can make,than we can make great strides against poverty.

All of us who have "made it" have an obligation, to give back. We do this by acting as surrogates,mentors, and advocates. These efforts do not take money, only time and a passion to impact a life in a positive way.

We have to decide as a civil society whether,the path we have chosen to take is working. In fact, we know it is not. How can we be be satisfied with discarding beautiful lives to the penal system. The cost to us is monumental, not only in terms of money, but in the lose of human capital.

I personally have committed myself to community service. I believe that a purposeful life is well lived. Touching lives through active involvement, is the only way to make a difference. Caring, sharing, and, loving.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
Protesters at Seattle University on Feb. 25. Photo: SEIU Local 925 via Flickr

Adjunct voices

Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.

Recent Posts

  • 02.25.15

    Adjuncts Unite

    What would higher education look like without adjunct professors? That’s what a grass-roots group of academics is trying to prove by holding a National Adjunct Walk-out Day on February 25.
  • 02.19.15

    To Test or Not to Test?

    Sometime in the next few weeks, Senate Republicans and Democrats will vote to reauthorize The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. On the podcast this week, we talk to two education advocates who differ on how and when we should test our kids.
  • 02.11.15

    Looking back: An Imperfect Revolution

    In June 2007, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down school desegregation plans that look at students’ race. This week on the podcast, we’re featuring our 2007 documentary, “An Imperfect Revolution: Voices from the Desegregation Era,"
  • 02.04.15

    Are HBCUs the Key to Producing More African American Physicians?

    We talk to a Dallas doctor who thinks HBCUs may be the best pathways for African Americans interested in careers in medicine.