American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Breaking the Cycle of Poverty Now

File under: education, health, job training, civil rights, welfare

0 (0 votes)

From: Don K., San Antonio, TX

Just like any thing worth doing all of us have to make a commitment to it.

Currently in America we assume some one else will do it, than believe that it is actually happening. Usually it is left to the government which we love to hate so much, or some other organization.

I believe Hillary Clinton when she says, 'it takes a village to raise a child'. This really holds true today,when we see so many children in a state of need and abandonment.

Ending poverty begins with one child at a time. First we have to make certain that every child that is conceived, and is wanted, is protected. Too many believe that our obligations end once the child is born,in fact it is only beginning.

The prospective mother must have the support, first from conception to birth, with proper education, prenatal care, and nutrition.

Secondly, once the child is born to support him or her, by offering the parent quality daycare for the child, and protection from the worldly ills.

Twenty four hour centers need to be open and available.

Thirdly, to follow the child through High School, providing all the support necessary to help him and her along the way.

Money is important, but is only a part of the solution, community involvement is the most important.

If we can convince each other that the welfare of our children is the most important effort we can make,than we can make great strides against poverty.

All of us who have "made it" have an obligation, to give back. We do this by acting as surrogates,mentors, and advocates. These efforts do not take money, only time and a passion to impact a life in a positive way.

We have to decide as a civil society whether,the path we have chosen to take is working. In fact, we know it is not. How can we be be satisfied with discarding beautiful lives to the penal system. The cost to us is monumental, not only in terms of money, but in the lose of human capital.

I personally have committed myself to community service. I believe that a purposeful life is well lived. Touching lives through active involvement, is the only way to make a difference. Caring, sharing, and, loving.


Comments:

American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.