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Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Pay wages comparable to the cost of living

File under: income, Human and civil rights, public perception

0 (0 votes)

From: Jan L., Fairfield, ME

When the poor are asked how to end poverty, they instantly reply: "Give us enough money." This is true if you are working at a job paying under $10 an hour, or on disability or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF).

Since 1349 and 1350 (no mistake in the years), the labor laws decided that workers were being paid to much. And this attitude has stuck to 2010.

We must have an economy of love, rather than one of gross profits for businesses. It's time to turn away from "whatever the market will bear," to "what is fair," a modest profit for all, and everyone paid a real, livable wage.

We need to educate the wealthy.


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American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.