American RadioWorks |
school-discipline

Spare the Rod

A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don't make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.

Recent Posts



in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Pay wages comparable to the cost of living

File under: income, Human and civil rights, public perception

0 (0 votes)

From: Jan L., Fairfield, ME

When the poor are asked how to end poverty, they instantly reply: "Give us enough money." This is true if you are working at a job paying under $10 an hour, or on disability or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF).

Since 1349 and 1350 (no mistake in the years), the labor laws decided that workers were being paid to much. And this attitude has stuck to 2010.

We must have an economy of love, rather than one of gross profits for businesses. It's time to turn away from "whatever the market will bear," to "what is fair," a modest profit for all, and everyone paid a real, livable wage.

We need to educate the wealthy.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
school-discipline

Spare the Rod

A get-tough attitude prevailed among educators in the 1980s and 1990s, but research shows that zero-tolerance policies don't make schools safer and lead to disproportionate discipline for students of color.

Recent Posts