American RadioWorks |

An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Find satisfaction in more than money

File under: hope, success, public perception, social networks

0 (0 votes)

From: Phil S., Eagan, MN

There is a plethora of research that points to so many different factors as being contributors to poverty: education, social circumstance, skin color, etc. I believe the problem is in how we define poverty.

In the United States we tend to frame it in monetary or material terms. Meanwhile, in some of the developing countries, whole communities of people live in poverty by our standards, but continue to survive with a sense of joy, and some hope.

The difference seems to be in the notion of community. In those poorer communities, the people see themselves as being in this situation together, and they help each other. In the United States, everyone's on their own.

Ultimately, I think breaking the cycle of poverty involves doing a lot of things.

1) We have to change how we, as a culture, define success so that it is focused on achievements, rather than on amount of income.

2) We have to ensure that every child has access to an environment that educates, inspires, and affirms them as individuals who contribute to society.

3) We have to instill in each child appreciation that being fully human means employing the gifts they have in ways that contribute positively to society and allow them to support themselves and their families -- that success is not gauged by the amount of money one has, or the power one wields.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |

An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.

Recent Posts

  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.
  • 02.25.15

    Adjuncts Unite

    What would higher education look like without adjunct professors? That’s what a grass-roots group of academics is trying to prove by holding a National Adjunct Walk-out Day on February 25.
  • 02.19.15

    To Test or Not to Test?

    Sometime in the next few weeks, Senate Republicans and Democrats will vote to reauthorize The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. On the podcast this week, we talk to two education advocates who differ on how and when we should test our kids.
  • 02.11.15

    Looking back: An Imperfect Revolution

    In June 2007, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down school desegregation plans that look at students’ race. This week on the podcast, we’re featuring our 2007 documentary, “An Imperfect Revolution: Voices from the Desegregation Era,"