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(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Find satisfaction in more than money

File under: hope, success, public perception, social networks

0 (0 votes)

From: Phil S., Eagan, MN

There is a plethora of research that points to so many different factors as being contributors to poverty: education, social circumstance, skin color, etc. I believe the problem is in how we define poverty.

In the United States we tend to frame it in monetary or material terms. Meanwhile, in some of the developing countries, whole communities of people live in poverty by our standards, but continue to survive with a sense of joy, and some hope.

The difference seems to be in the notion of community. In those poorer communities, the people see themselves as being in this situation together, and they help each other. In the United States, everyone's on their own.

Ultimately, I think breaking the cycle of poverty involves doing a lot of things.

1) We have to change how we, as a culture, define success so that it is focused on achievements, rather than on amount of income.

2) We have to ensure that every child has access to an environment that educates, inspires, and affirms them as individuals who contribute to society.

3) We have to instill in each child appreciation that being fully human means employing the gifts they have in ways that contribute positively to society and allow them to support themselves and their families -- that success is not gauged by the amount of money one has, or the power one wields.


Comments:

American RadioWorks |
(Photos: Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library)

The First Family of Radio

When Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected president in 1932, he and first lady Eleanor Roosevelt both used the new medium of radio to reach into American homes like never before. They rallied the nation to combat the Great Depression and fight fascism. The Roosevelts forged an uncommonly personal relationship with the people. This documentary explores how FDR and ER's use of radio revolutionized the way Americans relate to the White House and its occupants.

Recent Posts

  • 11.24.14

    Academic Fraud and College Athletics

    Last month the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill released a report that showed evidence of nearly two decades of academic fraud perpetuated by the school’s Afro-American Studies Department. An investigation found certain professors and administrators had an unwritten policy of “propping up” student athletes. This week on the podcast, we look at academic fraud at colleges with high-stakes sports programs.
  • 11.17.14

    The Utility of a PhD

    Humanities professors at colleges and universities are re-thinking what it means to offer a PhD. The old model is proving unsustainable. It takes an average nine years to get a doctorate, but less than 60 percent of PhDs are finding tenure-track teaching jobs. This week, we look at a new report recommending academics view doctoral programs in a new light.
  • 11.10.14

    Radio: FDR’s ‘Natural Gift’

    President Franklin D. Roosevelt was a radio natural. He spoke in a confident, informal way, using simple words and phrases that were easy to grasp.
  • 11.12.14

    The Roosevelts as a political team

    Eleanor and Franklin Roosevelt were not the first White House couple to act as political partners, but they were the first to do so in such a public fashion.