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Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Find satisfaction in more than money

File under: hope, success, public perception, social networks

0 (0 votes)

From: Phil S., Eagan, MN

There is a plethora of research that points to so many different factors as being contributors to poverty: education, social circumstance, skin color, etc. I believe the problem is in how we define poverty.

In the United States we tend to frame it in monetary or material terms. Meanwhile, in some of the developing countries, whole communities of people live in poverty by our standards, but continue to survive with a sense of joy, and some hope.

The difference seems to be in the notion of community. In those poorer communities, the people see themselves as being in this situation together, and they help each other. In the United States, everyone's on their own.

Ultimately, I think breaking the cycle of poverty involves doing a lot of things.

1) We have to change how we, as a culture, define success so that it is focused on achievements, rather than on amount of income.

2) We have to ensure that every child has access to an environment that educates, inspires, and affirms them as individuals who contribute to society.

3) We have to instill in each child appreciation that being fully human means employing the gifts they have in ways that contribute positively to society and allow them to support themselves and their families -- that success is not gauged by the amount of money one has, or the power one wields.


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American RadioWorks |
Martin Luther King Jr. is jostled in Memphis as the march he's leading on March 28, 1968 turns violent. Photo courtesy University of Memphis Libraries.

King's Last March

Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968. Four decades later, King remains one of the most vivid symbols of hope for racial unity in America. But that's not the way he was viewed in the last year of his life.

Recent Posts

  • 01.22.15

    Free Community College for All

    President Barack Obama wants to make the first two years of community college free for what he calls “responsible students” who are “willing to work for it.” It’s being called “America’s College Promise.” This week on the podcast we examine the prospect of free community college for all.
  • 01.14.15

    What’s in a number?

    Our guest this week has a message for high school seniors and their parents who are poring over the latest college rankings lists: Put ‘em down.
  • 01.05.15

    Following the Money in Education Philanthropy

    Philanthropic foundations have been giving money to public education for years. But our guest this week argues that philanthropies are increasingly pushing specific educational agendas.
  • 12.23.14

    Who’s missing from the achievement gap debate?

    The achievement gap refers to the disparities in academic success between lower-income students of color and their more affluent white counterparts. But according to Quyen Dinh, executive director of the national advocacy organization Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC), one group often left out of the conversation is Southeast Asian American students.