American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Privatize Social Security (like Chile has)

File under: personalfinance, taxes

0 (0 votes)

From: Adakin V., Charleston, SC

Please note that "poverty" is relative. According to "The Economist" magazine, what is called poverty in the United States is equal to the same standard of living that the "average" worker in Europe has.

Take a look at this:

http://www.etftrends.com/2009/06/7-reasons-like-chile-its-etf/

Please note item six: "Chile boasts a poverty rate of 13%, down from 39% in 1990."

So what happened in Chile over the past 20 years?

What happened was the maturity of Chile's social security paradigm, where individuals own their accounts -- they invest what would have gone to government-run Social Security into a private retirement account. And when a worker dies, the lifetime of accrued contributions and compounding interest is part of his or her estate, going to heirs and favorite charities.

Just think of the macro-economic benefits to a young family when grandparents die and leave them with enough to pay off their mortgage, or fund their kid's college, or allow them to buy that business franchise, or invest in whatever opportunity avails itself. Just think of the young couple whose grandparents die when they are in their 20s or 30s, and whose parents die when they are in their 50s or 60s. These periodic slugs of capital are outside of this couple's normal earnings. And it's these slugs of capital that blossom into real wealth creation once that family's normal everyday needs are satisfied.

The Chilean Social Security paradigm is the best solution to systemic poverty, because it allows multi-generational wealth accrual.


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American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball