American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

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    Greater Expectations transcript

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Privatize Social Security (like Chile has)

File under: personalfinance, taxes

0 (0 votes)

From: Adakin V., Charleston, SC

Please note that "poverty" is relative. According to "The Economist" magazine, what is called poverty in the United States is equal to the same standard of living that the "average" worker in Europe has.

Take a look at this:

http://www.etftrends.com/2009/06/7-reasons-like-chile-its-etf/

Please note item six: "Chile boasts a poverty rate of 13%, down from 39% in 1990."

So what happened in Chile over the past 20 years?

What happened was the maturity of Chile's social security paradigm, where individuals own their accounts -- they invest what would have gone to government-run Social Security into a private retirement account. And when a worker dies, the lifetime of accrued contributions and compounding interest is part of his or her estate, going to heirs and favorite charities.

Just think of the macro-economic benefits to a young family when grandparents die and leave them with enough to pay off their mortgage, or fund their kid's college, or allow them to buy that business franchise, or invest in whatever opportunity avails itself. Just think of the young couple whose grandparents die when they are in their 20s or 30s, and whose parents die when they are in their 50s or 60s. These periodic slugs of capital are outside of this couple's normal earnings. And it's these slugs of capital that blossom into real wealth creation once that family's normal everyday needs are satisfied.

The Chilean Social Security paradigm is the best solution to systemic poverty, because it allows multi-generational wealth accrual.


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American RadioWorks | Hearing is Seeing
Students in Kentucky taking a Common Core math test. (Photo: Emily Hanford)

Greater Expectations

The United States is in the midst of a huge education reform. The Common Core State Standards are a new set of expectations for what students should learn each year in school. The standards have been adopted by most states, though there's plenty of controversy about them among activists and politicians. Most teachers, however, actually like the standards. This American RadioWorks documentary takes listeners into classrooms to explore how the standards are changing teaching and learning. Teachers say Common Core has the potential to help kids who are behind, as well as those who are ahead. But many teachers have big concerns about the Common Core tests. The new, tougher tests are meant to let the nation know how kids are really doing in school -- but bad scores could get teachers and principals fired.

Recent Posts

  • 08.29.14

    Greater Expectations transcript

  • 08.28.14

    A teacher loses faith in the Common Core

    New York teacher Kevin Glynn was once a big fan of the Common Core, but he says the standardized testing that's come along with it is reducing students to test scores and narrowing what gets taught in schools.
  • 08.28.14

    Are you smarter than a Common Core student? Try a Common Core test

    New Common Core tests are supposed to measure students' ability to think critically, analyze information, and cite evidence as well as test their conceptual understanding of mathematics and their ability to apply math to the real world. See how you'd do on a Common Core test.
  • 08.28.14

    Questioning the Common Core tests

    In the United States, education standards come with tests. Most students haven't been tested on the Common Core yet. But in one state where they have, the controversy is so intense that it's threatening to bring down the Common Core altogether.