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The campus of the University of Chicago. Kevin Carey says most students of the future won't be going to traditional college campuses. Photo: Wikipedia.

The End of College or the University of Everywhere

When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Privatize Social Security (like Chile has)

File under: personalfinance, taxes

0 (0 votes)

From: Adakin V., Charleston, SC

Please note that "poverty" is relative. According to "The Economist" magazine, what is called poverty in the United States is equal to the same standard of living that the "average" worker in Europe has.

Take a look at this:

http://www.etftrends.com/2009/06/7-reasons-like-chile-its-etf/

Please note item six: "Chile boasts a poverty rate of 13%, down from 39% in 1990."

So what happened in Chile over the past 20 years?

What happened was the maturity of Chile's social security paradigm, where individuals own their accounts -- they invest what would have gone to government-run Social Security into a private retirement account. And when a worker dies, the lifetime of accrued contributions and compounding interest is part of his or her estate, going to heirs and favorite charities.

Just think of the macro-economic benefits to a young family when grandparents die and leave them with enough to pay off their mortgage, or fund their kid's college, or allow them to buy that business franchise, or invest in whatever opportunity avails itself. Just think of the young couple whose grandparents die when they are in their 20s or 30s, and whose parents die when they are in their 50s or 60s. These periodic slugs of capital are outside of this couple's normal earnings. And it's these slugs of capital that blossom into real wealth creation once that family's normal everyday needs are satisfied.

The Chilean Social Security paradigm is the best solution to systemic poverty, because it allows multi-generational wealth accrual.


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American RadioWorks |
The campus of the University of Chicago. Kevin Carey says most students of the future won't be going to traditional college campuses. Photo: Wikipedia.

The End of College or the University of Everywhere

When education policy wonk Kevin Carey looks into the future, he sees the end of traditional colleges and universities and he says that's a good thing.

Recent Posts

  • 03.18.15

    UnRetirement

    Today older Americans are heading back to school in record numbers. Many have already started a career, but want to gain knowledge or skills that can make them more competitive in the workplace. Colleges and universities are grappling with the needs of a changing population of students.
  • 03.11.15

    The Test

    In her new book,“The Test: Why Our Schools are Obsessed with Standardized Testing–But You Don’t Have to Be,” NPR Education Blogger Anya Kamenetz examines the role testing plays in American public education.
  • 03.04.15

    An Administrator Responds to Adjunct Protests

    Last week, we talked about growing dissent among adjunct college instructors who claim they’re not getting compensated fairly for the work they do. This week we’ll hear from someone who has dealt with this issue from the administration side.
  • 02.26.15

    Adjunct voices

    Ahead of National Adjunct Walkout Day on February 25th, American RadioWorks asked adjunct professors around the country how things are going for them. The short answer? Not well.