American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball


in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Care about others (Fight the war within)

File under: social networks

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From: Patricia A., minneapolis, MN

The "war within" is simply the war of the mind. Why? Because our thoughts control us. If the war within is somehow controlled, people would automatically make right choices -- choices that would affect not only "us four and no more," but the rest of society as well.

Unfortunately, there is a lack of respect and regard for human life. It is not just our teens who feel an incredibly unfounded sense of entitlement. Adults, too, for one reason or another, are selfish and self-centered, and refuse to help others less fortunate than themselves.

The haves and the have nots, we will have always, but we need a balance of equality, a balance of opportunity, a balance of education, a balance of human rights, a balance of housing opportunities, a balance of job opportunities, a balance of health care quality to all -- just to name a few.

People cannot become financial stable until their basic human needs are met. If one is hungry and homeless, education isn't going to be a priority. There is a war within that is eroding our families, our communities, our cities, and our states -- our world. Selfishness, pride, envy, jealousy, and the worst of them, prejudice, are the culprits. They all come from within. theses are not outside issues; these issues can't be resolved from a doctor's visit, or a healing salve. These are issues of the heart.

I do my small part by giving at every opportunity I can. I give a smile, a hug; I recycle my clothes to someone who needs and appreciates them. I give my time; I cautiously open my home to others, prepare a meal, buy a meal, or offer a ride to someone who doesn't have a car. I encourage someone, even when I need encouragement myself; offer something of value (to me) knowing that the person can't pay me back; and simply acknowledge another person's existence. People need to know they're not invisible. I give even when I need to be given to. I'm so far from perfect, and I always make mistakes. But there's one thing I'm good at, and that's loving or trying to love my neighbor as I love myself. This is my small way of helping others become not just financially stable, but stable in body, soul, and mind.


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American RadioWorks |
teaching-teachers

Teaching Teachers

Research shows good teaching makes a big difference in how much kids learn. But the United States lacks an effective system for training new teachers or helping them get better once they're on the job. This documentary examines why, and asks what it would take to improve American teaching on a wide scale. We meet researchers who are trying to understand what makes teaching complex, and how to determine whether someone is ready to be a teacher. We also visit U.S. schools that are taking a page from Japan and radically rethinking the way they approach the idea of teacher improvement.

Recent Posts

  • 08.27.15

    An American way of teaching

    In 1993, a group of researchers set out to do something that had never been done before. They would hire a videographer to travel across the United States and record a random sample of eighth-grade math classes. What they found revealed a lot about American teaching.
  • 08.27.15

    Rethinking teacher preparation

    In the United States, teaching isn't treated as a profession that requires extensive training like law or medicine. Teaching is seen as something you can figure out on your own, if you have a natural gift for it. But looking for gifted people won't work to fill the nation's classrooms with teachers who know what they're doing.
  • 08.27.15

    A different approach to teacher learning: Lesson study

    In the United States, we tend to think that improving education is about improving teachers - recruiting better ones, firing bad ones. But the Japanese think about improving teaching. It's a very different idea.
  • 08.27.15

    Thinking about math from someone else’s perspective

    "What you do when you’re teaching is you think about other people’s thinking. You don’t think about your own thinking; you think what other people think. That’s really hard." -Deborah Ball