American RadioWorks |
Divestment protest at University of Wisconsin-Madison, April 4, 2014. Photo: Light Brigade on Flickr.

Divestment on Campus

Across the world, college students are urging their institutions to “divest” from fossil fuels. This week we ask: is the divestment movement working?

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in collaboration with Spotlight on Poverty and Opportunity

Care about others (Fight the war within)

File under: social networks

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From: Patricia A., minneapolis, MN

The "war within" is simply the war of the mind. Why? Because our thoughts control us. If the war within is somehow controlled, people would automatically make right choices -- choices that would affect not only "us four and no more," but the rest of society as well.

Unfortunately, there is a lack of respect and regard for human life. It is not just our teens who feel an incredibly unfounded sense of entitlement. Adults, too, for one reason or another, are selfish and self-centered, and refuse to help others less fortunate than themselves.

The haves and the have nots, we will have always, but we need a balance of equality, a balance of opportunity, a balance of education, a balance of human rights, a balance of housing opportunities, a balance of job opportunities, a balance of health care quality to all -- just to name a few.

People cannot become financial stable until their basic human needs are met. If one is hungry and homeless, education isn't going to be a priority. There is a war within that is eroding our families, our communities, our cities, and our states -- our world. Selfishness, pride, envy, jealousy, and the worst of them, prejudice, are the culprits. They all come from within. theses are not outside issues; these issues can't be resolved from a doctor's visit, or a healing salve. These are issues of the heart.

I do my small part by giving at every opportunity I can. I give a smile, a hug; I recycle my clothes to someone who needs and appreciates them. I give my time; I cautiously open my home to others, prepare a meal, buy a meal, or offer a ride to someone who doesn't have a car. I encourage someone, even when I need encouragement myself; offer something of value (to me) knowing that the person can't pay me back; and simply acknowledge another person's existence. People need to know they're not invisible. I give even when I need to be given to. I'm so far from perfect, and I always make mistakes. But there's one thing I'm good at, and that's loving or trying to love my neighbor as I love myself. This is my small way of helping others become not just financially stable, but stable in body, soul, and mind.


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American RadioWorks |
Divestment protest at University of Wisconsin-Madison, April 4, 2014. Photo: Light Brigade on Flickr.

Divestment on Campus

Across the world, college students are urging their institutions to “divest” from fossil fuels. This week we ask: is the divestment movement working?

Recent Posts

  • 05.20.15

    Can how you move change how you think?

    Scientists have long thought of the brain as a “control center” for the body – a kind of computer that dictates how we move. But what if how we walk and stand and gesture could actually change how we think?
  • 05.12.15

    Forest Schools

    What if one day a week, school was in the woods? On the podcast, Emily Hanford takes us to Vermont to understand why teachers wanted to take their students into the forest, and what the kids -- and the teachers -- are learning from it.
  • 05.06.15

    Exposing Conditions at Native Schools

    There are 183 federally-run Bureau of Indian Education schools in the nation, and about a third of these are in poor condition. Some students at BIE schools deal with poorly-insulated classrooms, holes in the roof, rodents, and other issues on a daily basis.
  • 04.29.15

    Green Teachers

    A generation ago, if you walked into an American classroom, you’d likely find a veteran teacher who'd been on the job for 15 years or more. Today you're more likely to find a brand-new teacher – someone who's been the job for a year or less.